321 GO!

Interstellar Adventures and Dopey Challenge Motivation: Insights from Jeff Galloway and the Exclusive Premiere of John Pelkey's Disney Wish Performance

October 06, 2023 Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey Season 1 Episode 15
321 GO!
Interstellar Adventures and Dopey Challenge Motivation: Insights from Jeff Galloway and the Exclusive Premiere of John Pelkey's Disney Wish Performance
321 GO! +
Become a supporter of the show!
Starting at $3/month
Support
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever dreamt of embarking on an interstellar adventure aboard the Galactic Starcruiser? How about completing the daunting Dopey challenge? Well, John and I are here to take you on an extraordinary journey in our bonus episode, packed with inspirational stories and motivational tips from legendary Jeff Galloway. We discuss everything from exploring the Starcruiser and its amenities to the immersive Star Wars cruise on the Millennium Falcon. Buckle up for this cosmic adventure, where we also discuss the art of improvisational acting skills to truly immerse yourself in the experience.

As we gear up towards the Marathon weekend, we share John's memorable performance of the song "Out There" from Disney's Hunchback of Notre Dame singing alongside Broadway superstar, Josh Strickland. And for those of you prepping for the Dopey challenge, Jeff Galloway is back with more invaluable advice. He provides practical tips for those of you who've missed runs due to the hot weather or lack of training. From adding more walks into long runs to emphasizing the importance of avoiding injury and fatigue, Jeff's insights are a treasure trove for all athletes out there.

Now, let's talk about the all-important Dopey Challenge. If you're worried about lost training time, fear not, as Jeff shares his expert advice on how to make up for it. He explains the importance of adjusting your run-walk-run in favor of walking and suggests walking the entire distance of a long run to build the same endurance that running would offer. And the best part? An opportunity to have Jeff and familiar faces from our podcast coach you through the Dopey challenge! So, get ready to push your limits and accomplish something genuinely remarkable with us!

Support the show

Let Registered Dietitian Carissa Galloway lead you through a science-backed plan to transform the way you think about your diet.
Visit www.GallowayCourse.com and use the code PODCAST at checkout for a great discount!

Become a 321 Go! supporter. Help us continue to create! HERE

Follow us!
@321GoPodcast
@carissa_gway
@pelkman19

Email us 321GoPodcast@gmail.com

Order Carissa's New Book - Run Walk Eat

Improve sleep, boost recovery and perform at your best with PILLAR’s range of magnesium recovery supplements.

Use code 321GO at www.theFeed.com to get 15% off your first purchase, for North American listeners, and if you are outside the states you can find it at www.pillarperformance.shop

Let Sara Akers with RunsOnMagic plan your next runDisney weekend!
IG @runsonmagic or you can go to www.RUNSONMAGIC.com or email her runsonmagictravel@gmail.com

Use Promo Code 321GO when you request your vacation quote for a chance to win a $200 Disney Gift Card or booking credit!

...

Speaker 1:

Welcome to 321 Go the Podcast. I'm John Pelkey.

Speaker 2:

And I'm Karissa Galloway and we're bringing you stories from start to finish to keep the everyday athlete motivated to keep moving towards the next finish. John, listeners get excited. Fireworks, because it's a bonus episode day, wow, great fireworks out.

Speaker 1:

We had the opportunity to get some mid-season tips from the one and only Jeff Galloway. For those of you who are training for Dopey it's coming up, folks, it's coming quickly.

Speaker 2:

That's right. Make sure you're getting in those miles. Hopefully you're listening to us while you do so. We're also going to talk about a special opportunity John had. He didn't need his passport, but he ventured into space for a few hours on something that might not be able to do anymore. And, ladies and gentlemen, the world broadcast debut of Mr John Pelkey singing aboard the Disney wish. John, how do you feel?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, well, I'm glad I'm not going to be in the room with people when they listen to it, though I think I think I did okay. But it was a. It was great opportunity and in case you're worried folks, it's not just me at the karaoke bar, after a couple of scotches singing Dream On by Aero Smith, by the way, I should have mentioned we, that used to be my, that used to be my go to, that used to be my go to. By the way, I had Aero Smith tickets for next week and they've canceled and are rescheduling after the first of the year because Steve and Tyler's got vocal problems. You know who doesn't have vocal problems? Me singing on the Disney wish. So it was a great opportunity for me. That got some really nice feedback from the lovely people on the DBC wish and singing for just just a moment, just a slight moment, with a Broadway star. There you go.

Speaker 2:

That's my drop. Thanks for listening. Let's do this. Oh, we have another awesome bonus episode for you guys today because we know, even though it's it's fall now, dopey is there. We are in the midst of dopey training, so I have the privilege that Jeff Gallaway sometimes comes to my house. He sleeps in this room that I'm in. I sleep to my office. It takes over my office, which is fine. I'm not bitter at all. It's fine. It's Jeff Gallaway. But since he was here, we said why not get a little of Jeff's knowledge to help those people who are in the midst of dopey? That time, or your brain might be saying what did I sign up for? How can I do this? So we've got a one on one with Jeff to give you some tips to get through dopey, to keep going through that training, and also we're going to let everybody know throughout the episode how to take part in an opportunity to have Jeff and some other people you've heard in this podcast as your personal coach to get you to your finish line. So that's coming up, john. But before we get to that, yeah, so excited to have some time to talk about what we've teased far too many times on this podcast your journey into. Is it outer space? Is it at? Where did you go? What was your?

Speaker 1:

job, let's go. Well, I guess we'll go outer space yeah, I had an opportunity to to For a not a full two day cruise, but a three hour tour. I know it's all I could think of and I hope that someone who decided it would be three hours actually had that on their mind. I got on. The galactic star cruiser is, as you know, I my wife is friends Air quotes with this, because I don't think we've actually put this part out there maybe not, maybe not. So she is friends, I'm important everyone listen up.

Speaker 2:

I think this is remarkable. We're why far more talented than you.

Speaker 1:

Well, and again I've set the bar low. So what does that really?

Speaker 2:

look like one would think yes, just kidding, talked about that. Okay, chris, it was, if you have a listen before.

Speaker 1:

Chris was surprised. My wife was attractive.

Speaker 2:

Apparently she didn't think I'd be able to land, or yet it was.

Speaker 1:

But anyway, quote, air quotes she's friends with Captain Kevan on the star cruiser, so they had a. They had a little friends and family thing for folks, because if people don't, know, listen to this podcast.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, hello.

Speaker 1:

You're not listening closely, but they are. They are sadly bringing the star cruiser experience to an end at the end of September. I think the final cruise is 27th, 28th of September. So they gave an opportunity for those of us who had connection to folks on the star cruiser to take a three hour tour where we got to see a little bit of the action stuff that happened. We got to sample some of the food, we got to take a tour of the cabins that you stay in and just the ship, the whole ship was kind of open for us to see things and it was, you know, for a kid again, when Star Wars came out in may of 1977, I was 12 years old, I turned 13 that summer and you know, you know, when you're 12 years old, carissa, the big movie, the big band of those are things that are just as so nostalgic to you and then take into account for and for those of you who are too young to remember it or too old to remember it, as I'm learning you can get you. It was a cultural phenomenon that that film, and so it really occupies a large place in our lives, and I reverted back to that 12 year old kid when I got on this this just amazing thing that Disney built this galactic star cruiser and it was it was just terrific and hats off to everybody who had any part in this the designers, the directors, the obviously the great cast members who worked in support, the folks in the, in the bartenders, because we got to sample some of the the really really cool craft cocktails, and I was really smart I brought my friend David along, who's a An orthodontist and thus has a lot more money than the rest of us.

Speaker 2:

I thought he's gonna say you brush your teeth after you try to get. Well, he does that Sugar off your teeth.

Speaker 1:

Yes, he does, and I do try to take good care of my teeth, but also, with all that money and me, get him on the starkers. I made him buy my drinks and I think that was only fair for that. But, and then of particularly the folks in entertainment, the performers, my hats off because it was truly, truly unique. And I am we've said this so many times on this podcast I am as cynical as anybody about all of this stuff. Theme park entertainment. I've been doing it for 33 years and frankly and you know this, chris is, some of the magic goes away a little bit when you're, when you're there all the time and when you know. You know some of the backstage stuff. But that was not the case at all for this. I was as overwhelmed as I was when I was a kid and went on Space Mountain for the first time. It's truly something special and I hope that they find some, some way to repurpose it or bring it back, because if all you have to do is go on a site where the folks who have actually done the full two days, two and a half days, and get their comments to see what it meant to the people who were able to go on it, and I know it's and it was an expensive endeavor, but I want to lay this out for you. It was around $5,000 for the two nights for a room, not per person, and there was a lot of stuff out on the Internet that that was incorrect about that. The rooms can sleep up to five people comfortably, actually, and the rooms are just really, really cool. So that's twenty five hundred dollars per night. Split five ways, that's five hundred dollars and includes your meals. That is not as expensive. What's that?

Speaker 2:

5,000.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so 5,000 for the whole thing, so $2,500 a night, oh $2,000 a night.

Speaker 2:

Okay, I missed that. I just want to make sure, please don't make me do math again.

Speaker 1:

I have all of this written down $2,500 a night, split five ways, $500 a night, yes, but it included all your meals as well. And I don't know how much it cost to stay in the Grand Floridian, because I can't afford it. I know it's north of that, let's say and you don't get meals. And again, this is not a hotel, it is a fully immersive live action role playing. For people who don't know LARP, live action role playing is becoming a bigger and bigger entertainment entity LARP.

Speaker 2:

I've never heard that before. Oh, you've never heard live action role playing.

Speaker 1:

No LARP Yep. And it's truly, truly unique. And again, I can be as cynical as anybody, but hats off to the Walt Disney Company and everyone involved, because it greatly exceeded my expectations and I knew a lot about it going in, given my wife's close relationship with Captain Geven.

Speaker 2:

What was Jodi's emotions? Like I know, jodi was not a full-timer, so she filled in in this capacity. So people, I've been there, I didn't see her. What was her emotions like when this ended? Because I believe she took this very seriously because I had talked to her before we'd be somewhere and she'd say, oh, I can't go do this this day because I need to prepare for this for the next day, because she didn't do it all the time. And she took it very seriously because it was a very demanding performance role for her specifically. I don't know everybody else, but for hers was a very demanding role.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, one of the largest, one of the largest roles, but everyone really going above and beyond. And again, 33 years. I started at Universal in the spring of 1990, before it even opened. I've done countless theme park jobs, countless events throughout all of that time and there's really never been anything that required as much from the performers, because in the live action role playing stuff they're obviously scripted elements. Larp yes, larp Hitherto, to be fair to his LARP, they're scripted elements, but then there is a vast amount of improvisation that's required and you are interacting with different people. There are several hundred, a couple hundred people on this ship and you're interacting with all of them and there are technical elements that come into play where you can send them. They'll get messages from different characters on their phone, the app on their phone about missions that they can go on Again, I would never be able to do it justice to explain everything that it is, but, believe me, what's asked of the people on there was much greater than anything that's everybody ever been asked of performers in this town and I am as familiar with what people have to do in Disney and Universal shows as anyone. It really required a lot of work time.

Speaker 2:

Was it because you're saying that? And it can be a positive or a negative, it can be. Oh, this is too much work, this is too hard, but it seems like for everything I've heard, the people in this situation, because of the world they built, were more than willing and wanted to do it because it was such an enjoyable experience. Is that correct?

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, absolutely. That's the whole thing. You wanted to be prepared. As you said, the folks who weren't there on a consistent basis wanted to be prepared when they were coming back in because it was so much. You want to refresh and make sure you know that the scripted elements and the outline of the stories are there for you. But the interaction with everyone and some of the stories that I've heard about kids coming on, special needs kids, just people, older people who turned into little kids when they're, you know, chewbacca, is all of a sudden there and there's a picture of me with Chewbacca and I look at that and again I'm 12 years old. Again, they wanted to do that. So I'm not saying there's any complaint. I'm just saying that it was something that required elite talent, that was committed, and they had that in spades. She said when she was walking out, they were just, you know, fighting back tears the whole time and not being able to fight them back at other times because it was just so emotional. And when they walked out through the back doors, all the stormtroopers were lined up. Let's give you a clapping for it, I know, I know.

Speaker 2:

It's so good that she has to do it though.

Speaker 1:

But I tell you Mark my words that you haven't seen the last of that thing.

Speaker 2:

I think the way you're describing it and I haven't been on it, obviously I'm not going to go on it is exactly what Walt Disney envisioned when he created Disneyland Park Was a world that you went in, and then the point was that kids and adults could play together and adults could get lost in the story and again we don't know the reason. We're not going to go into the positives and negatives. It's going away. We had the highest hopes and we're putting it out in our universe that somehow that they can retain this idea and that other people can go on to enjoy it. Are we allowed to talk about what the schedule or the process was like for Jodi when she went into this universe? Like her day a little bit.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, she came in. She wasn't in the original crew. She came in a little bit later.

Speaker 2:

She had a long days and then she had an element of preparation every day to get ready for her role.

Speaker 1:

Right, right right. So it was I'm trying to believe it without saying it was an extensive rehearsal period. Again, the scripted and outlined elements of what you were doing, because it's over two days and there are many different tracks involved with this. You could go on and you could follow the first order, you could be part of the resistance or you could be neutral. Maybe you're just a smuggler looking out for yourself. Those create your own story that then fit into the story. So, in addition to learning the outline and my wife's a brilliant improvisational performer, so that part of it, as were all the people who were on there that was the part that was needed. But you had to familiarize yourself with the whole canon. Where does this fall in the Star Wars canon? What would you know about? What would you not know about? The history of that ship is it's the ship that Han and Leia went on for their honeymoon. So there's a lot of background information. Yeah, and they actually there's a place where they had inscribed their heart with their initials in it, in the engineering room, which we all went to see on the ship. So, yeah, it really really required not only the time that was put in there on the ship to learn all of the mechanics of what you were doing in the space, but also just familiarizing yourself with this. You just needed a background knowledge that you just don't have to do for most of the shows you do. You know, if you do a play, maybe you write a biography of your character prior to when he's seen on stage. He or she is seen on stage. Just to give you a starting point. I don't want to get too in the weeds.

Speaker 2:

John does that before every Run Disney Race. He does a background of himself.

Speaker 1:

I do, I do, I write a biography. Where is Johnny on?

Speaker 2:

this day. What is Pua and the ones he's feeling. You know what was his childhood like.

Speaker 1:

I really should, you know, and I really should actually you know, learn the Disney canon better than I would.

Speaker 2:

I don't think we're not performers at Run Disney.

Speaker 1:

That's true. So you know, in addition to all of the skills that you need to bring, and the learning part, and you know, knowing what your cues are and all of that, and then physical cues of things that you have to do. You know because you have to turn things on, and then there's a part where you're moving something, and all of those things. Then you just have to know this vast canon of Star Wars knowledge and where you fit in it. It really, it really, really remarkable. And again they swung for the fences with this one. They did not, they didn't pull a single punch. And for everybody who was complaining that it was, oh, it's so pricey, yeah, it sure is. But I put it to you this way I love to drive and I have a Mazda CX3 and I enjoy driving it.

Speaker 2:

You do.

Speaker 1:

I do. Yes, I like driving my car. I would like to.

Speaker 2:

I feel like I thought you had a different car.

Speaker 1:

You thought you didn't know. I had a Mazda. I used to have a. I parked it in front of your house like dozens of times. You used to have a Ford.

Speaker 2:

You had a Cooper, a Mini Cooper at some point no, that was Jodi.

Speaker 1:

She had a Mini Cooper years ago and I had a couple of Ford escapes, but I had a Mazda CX3. The point being, I would love to be and you were just part of your knee strip. You got to go to Monaco. I'd love to be in a Ferrari. I can't afford a Ferrari. That's not Ferrari's fault. They shouldn't start making cheaper cars so I can do that. I personally could not afford to go on it necessarily. I don't know if I would have to decide that, but don't hold that against the attraction, because it was remarkable and again, I think I've laid out that. Is it really any more expensive than a top level cruise on a cruise ship? I don't think it was.

Speaker 2:

Well, but it was a great journey. Do you have one moment that stands out from your three hours on there that you can kind of paint as a picture of what it was like? Did you get to pick a path at all? Did you get to do any of that? You were just kind of just taking it in.

Speaker 1:

We did get to pick a little bit of a path. We started out with our bridge training, which we're on the bridge with the captain, and we had to repel a tie fighter attack and we got to move from different area. There's one area where you're shooting at the tie fighters, you're controlling the weapons, one where you're controlling the shields and then where you're damaged control. So we got to do all of that, the bridge training, which was really, really cool, and then we were actually told by the captain to do something for the captain. I need you to go and do this for me, and I'm not going to actually say what that was, but that was a part of following the rebellion.

Speaker 2:

And of course, we followed that path.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, follow to follow that path. But then you know, because again it was a truncated thing, we weren't there for a long time. Then we were really just able to mingle with the characters around the ship. We saw Chewbacca come on, pictures with Chewbacca and Ray, and then the lightsaber fight that we got to see was pretty remarkable, and all this stuff is on the internet and I'm you know, if you don't, if you haven't booked a cruise nearby now, you're not going to get on there. But there's Kylo Ren's involved and it's just. It's just really really well done.

Speaker 2:

Did he give us muffin breaks, though? Was there any point in which Kylo Ren had a muffin?

Speaker 1:

No, there was no and I did not see Matt. Matt the radar technician.

Speaker 2:

That's where I'm at, matt the radar technician there, do you remember?

Speaker 3:

the first.

Speaker 2:

Star Wars we had so many mats running at us throwing us muffins. There were people dressed as math or a technician throwing us muffins.

Speaker 1:

Outside of Stormtroopers and Han Solo and Princess Leia, which are probably the three most common characters. Matt the radar technician was in the top five. Had to have been.

Speaker 2:

And they made the card. I'm sorry I killed your son.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely no. And now, and I will say that the folks who went on this thing, this dark cruiser, they, the vast majority of them, went fully into it. Yeah, I mean they backstories for their characters, costumes, and I haven't actually seen one specifically, but I'm sure there was a Matt the radar technician at some point. Well, hats off to Jody for being part of something that you know will go down in history as one of the most magical things that the Disney Star Wars really does universe has been able to create, and again fingers crossed that it's just the beginning of something, and I do think you will see and this goes across Disneyland, universal Studios, disney World, whatever live action role playing is going to become what the street theater used to be, which you see less and less of.

Speaker 2:

And, yeah, Can you say where Jody may be seen now at Hollywood Studios?

Speaker 1:

Occasionally. Let's just say, if you, if you happen to wander in for a sing along.

Speaker 2:

OK, yep, it's like you might.

Speaker 1:

You might see her and she. She's also still over there at the horror makeup show Universal with me.

Speaker 2:

As are you All right?

Speaker 1:

No, we're not there. We're not there very often, but she's also doing a number of different holidays.

Speaker 2:

You're coming home in Orlando.

Speaker 1:

Jody can help. Well, yes, she's working on that. And then the holidays are coming up and, for a performer, there's a lot of opportunities out there for Halloween events, christmas events. Sadly for me, there's no there's no Thanksgiving. Do we know? Yeah, I think we can. I think we can safely assume that will happen. And also maybe your favorite, your favorite witch. Well just let's not, you know.

Speaker 2:

I don't want to put that open bad karma out there, we'll see. Okay, okay, we're gonna move on. That's very exciting for my children, that's you're very reclaimed now.

Speaker 1:

You got very reclaimed, I am.

Speaker 2:

I forget. Okay, john, my memory is terrible and I forget that, like what I forgot something the other day. Oh, that you said I saw you in ragtime. I forget things. Oh, that's right reminded of my favorite annual thing to go see Jodi at, and I am excited that it. Hopefully we'll come back.

Speaker 1:

Well, by the way and we're gonna do this actually on the this is something we would normally do off the podcast, but I'm gonna tell you on the podcast that you asked me a question when you brought up the me singing thing. Yeah, you said would it be possible to do this? And I can now answer you and say it would absolutely be possible for us to Do that.

Speaker 2:

I forgot. Well, what was that to play?

Speaker 1:

See that, that part I'm not gonna tell you off the. You were asking about the possibility of audio.

Speaker 2:

Yes, do we have that?

Speaker 1:

Well, I sent it to you, so you but you did.

Speaker 2:

But then you said don't, you don't die of me, right, and I'm now telling you on.

Speaker 1:

So here's what we're gonna do.

Speaker 2:

Weston's gonna edit in right now the audio of John Pelkey. John set the stage for what we're about to hear.

Speaker 1:

All right. Well, I was. I was lucky enough. I worked at Disney Vacation Club cruises and I was asked to do a well partial duet, sing the Frollo part from hunchback of Notre Dame with with my friend Broadway star, the original Tarzan on Broadway, josh Strickland, and it was. It was really, really special and I think I did a pretty commendable job. So we will not play Josh's singing when you edit it, not because I don't want the comparison, but I did not reach out and ask him that. But if you want to, if you want to slip a little of mine in there, kind, when I didn't get pitchy.

Speaker 2:

Performance of a lifetime, yeah, so little Out there you're gonna stop talking, so we can need a dramatic. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, live from the Disney wish atrium. This is John Pelkey.

Speaker 3:

You teach, you eat, you, dress you. I will look upon you without fear. How can I protect you, boy, unless you always stay Away from you? But what?

Speaker 4:

I taught you was emotive.

Speaker 3:

Do as I say Stay, oh, pray and stay in Jesus.

Speaker 1:

Good job, John All right, We've listened to it. I've only. I've really only listened to it once. John's gonna listen to it more than once.

Speaker 2:

So that's it All right. So going from one star to another 1972 Olympian run. Disney Training Consultant. Best-selling author. Nicest man on the earth. We've got Jeff Galloway here. John, we've got questions about Dopey, let's get to him.

Speaker 1:

All right, jeff, welcome. Always great to have you. 16 weeks until Marathon weekend Hard to believe. What are the typical questions that you're getting around this point in people's training for Marathon or Goofy or even Dopey?

Speaker 4:

Well, there are several things that come up this time of year. Generally, I get questions concerning the Dopey in two areas. One of them is people who are generally focused, have generally been on track but have missed one or two runs because of the hot weather that we've had. The second group is among those that hadn't been doing hardly anything, and it's not too late to do the Dopey and to do the training for it. But you really need to consider and then put into place a number of things that won't get you injured or tired all the time. First thing, first group. That group that has been pretty diligent but missed some of the long runs can get back into the schedule pretty easily by putting more walking into the long runs as on the schedule. Let's take an example that I recently had presented to me a client who had only been doing a ho about. I think the figure was 10 miles was the longest run, and they had been scheduled to do a half marathon distance but it was too hot on that given day or whatever it was. So what I had that person do, and what I would recommend from anybody that's a little behind, is to walk at least one third of the distance of the next long run, or adjust the run, walk, run significantly in favor of the walking. For example, let's say someone, legitimately, was running for 60 seconds and walking for 30. Well, to catch up with the program, I would recommend 30, 30, and those are seconds 30 seconds, 30 seconds, or 20, 20, or 15, 15,. Or if someone is coming off a sickness or something and is a little concerned about the weariness of jumping back into long runs, I would simply do the walking the whole way on the next long run. We have found, without a doubt, that walking the entire distance of a long run will give you the same endurance that you would get from covering the distance running in any format. So the second group, that group that hasn't been doing a lot of running or maybe not at all walking is the key and I would definitely recommend on every one of the long weekends, to walk the entire distance until the fitness level comes back and that's probably not going to happen for most people who haven't been doing any regular training until about, oh, november, the middle of November. So you're going to be getting closer to the race date itself, but by walking again, you won't be beating yourself up and you will get all the endurance of the long one. Now what you would have to do is readjust the schedule the schedule that I did on the Run Disney site and you do that by counting back from the race weekend. The longest one is 26. The day before that would be a 12-miler, the day before that would be a five-miler and the day before that would be a three-miler to get in the dopey training. So that would stay in place and what you would do is subtract four miles from each long run distance and on every weekend that the dopy training is scheduled you would subtract four miles from the longest one. You would subtract three miles from the day before, which is the simulation for the half, and then on the day before that you could subtract a mile and a half and that will get you back to a doable amount of distance coming up, because the next training run is right around the corner and has best done this coming weekend.

Speaker 2:

Jeff, what are your recommendations for people? If they're wondering, should they take it easy on one of the race days for dopy? Should they walk the whole half marathon? Or even plan on time-willing walking the whole full?

Speaker 4:

The best strategy, as verified by thousands who have reported into me on this, is to walk the day before the marathon, to walk the half, and most people that I have talked to, with only a handful, three or four people, were caught up by the balloon ladies. But if you are caught towards the end of your half marathon, then go into a run-walk run that you've tested before. That can keep you at the 16-minute pace ahead of the balloon ladies, and the simple fix is just to join our pace group. The last pace group is right before the balloon ladies and they will get you through, and it's a fun group to go with too.

Speaker 1:

All right, jeff. From your standpoint, what should people look forward to about accomplishing something like the dopy challenge?

Speaker 4:

What it's about is, even though you are super tired, you can find a way to keep going. It's just a matter of not giving up, of continuing to go, and when you push yourself through an experience like that, you turn on brain circuits that make you feel amazing. And it's one of those things that I have heard from several thousand people now who have done the dopy training and the race itself. They question themselves all the way through the training and it was one of the most inspiring things that they've given themselves.

Speaker 2:

You've said, jeff, that training is difficult, getting ready for something like the dopy challenge. You five-time dopy challenge finisher in your program, your training. An element that is unique is that the long run actually takes people up to 26 miles and sometimes even more, and I know when people think that they think, oh gosh, that's so far. But why do you think this is important and how does it go on to help people?

Speaker 4:

Well, again, I definitely have studied the data on that and those who used to run 20 miles in preparation for a marathon and converted over to our 26 miles, the average improvement has been 15 minutes. And those who wanted to improve their times but had run 26 before and go up to my recommendation of 29 miles end up with an average improvement of 11 more minutes. So there's a lot of time that could be had. You can improve if you go longer, even if you go slower and even if you walk every step of those long runs. There are a lot of physiological benefits. The main one is identified by the research I've seen is the physiology inside the muscle itself in terms of the increase in blood capillary, so that you're getting more blood into the working muscles and you're withdrawing the waste products by the outflow of blood and you're getting more oxygen throughout the system. Not only does the oxygen help you during the run and in recovery, but it allows you to run aerobically for a long period of time, which means you're burning more fat you're not having to burn glycogen. And then the other major benefit physiologically is identified by the physiologist that study endurance running has been the mitochondria. They increase in size and in number and just to refresh you from your high school or college courses in physiology the mitochondria of the powerhouses inside the muscle cell. They are the components inside that muscle cell that convert your fuel into energy and make things happen there. And by doing the longer, long runs you are able to have more of those mitochondria working for you so that you are stronger for a longer period of time. And, as I said, that's the main reason why you see faster times when you go longer.

Speaker 1:

All right. As most people know, you're known for creating the run-walk-run method. That's helped millions, including myself, to get across the finish line. What's your elevator pitch for run-walk-run, and why should someone consider it if they're, just at this point, nonstop running?

Speaker 4:

Run-walk-run gives each person who does it control over how they feel during workouts, in recovery, and also, if you've had injuries before, it gives you control over how much stress you're going to put on those weak links that tend to result in injuries when you push them too far. The other major benefit is that it's what we were originally designed to do. According to the anthropologist's study ancient man they truly believe that our ancestors walked extremely long distances, but they didn't run long distances and if we go back to what we were designed to do run, walk, run the body can relate to that, it can keep going and it can allow you to do some just amazing things. The final point is in the benefits by time. Those who used to run nonstop in the marathon and found the right run, walk, run the average improvement is 13 minutes. Those who, in a half marathon, used to run nonstop and found the right run, walk, run there's a seven minute on the average improvement there. The best benefit has relate to me is the recovery. The recovery I ran faster and I recovered faster. I don't really understand how that was, but I'll take it.

Speaker 2:

And people can actually train personally With you. Jeff Galley can be their coach or people from their team. We alluded to this a little bit earlier, but tell us about that opportunity for personalized coaching.

Speaker 4:

The main benefit has relate to me by my clients over the years has been the accountability and the reinforcement of being able to do a hard workout and then get my feedback on it, because I always find good things that people did as a result of their hard workouts. And then the other area is the questions. There are always questions of training and you can never think of these in advance. They pop up after workouts and then you hear all this mixed reviews of everything on the internet and it's very hard to sort through that. Well, I do that for you and I explain why. It is based on science and also data that we have collected, and it's possible for you to do these amazing things, not be exhausted and not have aches and pains all the time.

Speaker 1:

Alright, Jeff, 16 weeks out. Could you give all these Dopey Challengers a little pep talk and a little extra motivation to get them through that difficult training?

Speaker 4:

Hey there, dopey Challenger, you are about to embark on a journey that only a select few dare to attempt. The Dopey Challenge isn't just a race. It's a testament to your determination, endurance and unwavering spirit. As you stand at the starting line, remember this you're stronger than you think, you're braver than you know and more resilient than you can imagine. You'll run a 5k, a 10k, a half marathon and a full marathon, all in the magical world of Disney. It's going to be a roller coaster of emotions, but I want you to keep these words close to your heart. First, believe in yourself. Trust in the countless hours of training and the fact that you did not give up. You kept with it, and that is the essence of what belief will do for you. When you get tired in your race weekend, embrace the journey. Remember that every step, every mile is part of your incredible journey. Savor the moments, the laughter, the challenges. Four they are the chapters of your story and they will be the things that you will get paying for the rest of your life. When you think about other challenges, once you get through the Dopey, you realize you can get through almost anything else. Third, you're not alone. You're surrounded by fellow runners who share your passion and dedication. It's like teamwork Lean on them when you need support and offer a helping hand when they need it. Fourth pace yourself. Rome wasn't built in the day, and neither is the Dopey Challenge conquered in one step or one mile. Find your rhythm, stay focused, conserve your energy for that long road ahead. Five mind over matter. When your legs grow weary and doubt creeps in, remember that your mind is the most powerful asset. You can and will overcome any obstacle that stands in your way if you will turn on your human brain. And, by the way, a simple tip there count your steps. When you start counting, you turn on your human brain, and that is going to do away with negative hormones that that monkey brain has been producing. And sixth celebrate every milestone. Each finish line you cross is a victory in itself. Celebrate these achievements with pride because they bring you closer to your ultimate goal. And just remember you can do it.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much, jeff. Always an honor to have you with us. We'll be seeing you at Wine and Dine at the Expo. John and I will be there and we'll be back next week with another episode of 3, 2, 1, go the Podcast.

Speaker 1:

Bye-bye. 3, 2, 1, Go.

Dopey Training Tips and Space Adventure
Star Wars
Preparing for Marathon Weekend
Dopey Challenge Training Tips and Motivation