321 GO!

Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend Recap with John, Tracy, and Riley!

January 10, 2024 Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey Season 1 Episode 31
321 GO!
Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend Recap with John, Tracy, and Riley!
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We are honored to be joined by our cohosts of the weekend Riley and Tracy to provide a little recap of the magical weekend that was the Walt Disney World Marathon!  

As we reminisce about some of the amazing stories we encountered like with the Pease brothers, Kyle and Brent, whose story of resilience and unity in the face of cerebral palsy has reshaped the contours of our spirits, we were reminded that the Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend is more than just a race; it's a vibrant celebration of human potential. Within this episode, we're sharing the heart-tugging narratives of those who traversed the marathon's magical miles, including the emotional encounters with participants like William, who shed over 200 pounds to cross the finish line, and Glenn who returned to running post-brain surgery. The power of these stories lies not just in the triumphs, but in the transformative journeys that led each runner to the starting line.

Weather may have rolled in with a plan of its own, but the runDisney community's spirit remained unshakable. We recount how a rainy half marathon day, reminiscent of a past half marathon's cancellation, became a testament to the unyielding support amongst runners, volunteers, and staff. The joyous defiance against the elements shone through as we reminisced about impromptu rain dances and finish line celebrations. We share a little behind-the-scenes look at weather contingencies, revealing the delicate balance of safety and sentiment that guides such challenging decisions.

Wrapping up our marathon recap, laughter bubbles to the surface as we recount the light-hearted moments that punctuate the intensity of race weekends. From Carissa's punchy commentary that left an imprint of humor on the runners, to the playful naming of the anthem-singing Dapper Dans, we're embracing the full spectrum of marathon weekend experiences. Join us as we weave through the shared laughter, the collective focus, and the individual feats that make the Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend an event where every step tells a story.

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Speaker 1:

Welcome to 321 Go the Podcast. I'm John Pelkey.

Speaker 2:

And I'm Karissa Galloway, and we're bringing you stories from start to finish to keep the everyday athlete motivated to keep moving towards the next finish. Today we're going to take you back to the weekend that was the Walt Disney World Marathon Weekends the stories, the costumes, the champions, the laughs, the tears. We're going to relive it all. And I say we, but I mean the proverbial we. So as we are recording this, I am out in the Disneyland Resort getting ready to welcome you guys back for the first time there for our awesome Disneyland weekend races. So we've got a very talented crew of announcers ready to do a little Monday morning quarterback on Marathon weekend. We've got John, we've got Riley, we've got Tracy and, before we throw it over to John, a huge thank you to both of our sponsors.

Speaker 2:

Sarah Akers Runs On Magic. She was there for Saturday race day. She's going to help you with all your future travel plans, whether it's Disney, a cruise, even, dare I say, universal. Head over to RunsOnMagiccom. Check her out. And then John and I both were recovering in our hotels with Normatech. I had my Venom back to. John did too, and I'm going to take my Normatech Go sleeves with me to Disneyland. Go to hypericecom, use the code 321GO and save and then tell us how amazing everything is All right, let's kick it off with John, riley and Tracy. Let's do this 3, 2, 1, go, and I'm going to turn it over to Mr John Kelke. John, how are you and where are you?

Speaker 1:

Hey, carissa, I'm at home here in a Koei Florida recovering. Thanks again to Hyperice, my back feels great. I'd like them to work on something that would help my voice and maybe my sleep deprivation, but I don't think they have things in that arena. Anyway, since Carissa's out there doing overnight rehearsals in California, I have called on the Ringers to help me with this marathon weekend recap episode. Wow, what a weekend it was.

Speaker 1:

I'm excited to be joined by the team that helps make the magic at the start and the finish line and beyond, my buddy Riley Claremont, and making her first appearance on 321GO, and definitely not her last, my friend Tracy Woo. Welcome, guys, you both look well rested given what we've been through the last weekend. For those of you listening, this is the Wednesday after marathon weekend that we're getting together to do this wrap up Now, before we get into the details of the weekend, tracy, this is your first appearance on 321GO. The podcast your origin story will be recording later. That'll come out prior to Princess, because we thought you being a princess. Frankly, we thought, tracy, if we didn't do it for Princess, you'd be angry with us and you'd quit and you'd trash the podcast left and right.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely.

Speaker 1:

So, since it's your first appearance, first of all, how are you, where are you, and then let everybody know a little bit about you before we jump into this weekend.

Speaker 3:

I'm doing great. I'm finally over the weekend, got some rest, got like 10 hours of sleep Sunday night. I am currently in Winnah Park, florida, at my day job in an eSports practice space. I help run an eSports team for a university and, yeah, life is good. We'll tell them the story later.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and your first marathon, full marathon weekend, yeah, so you were able to get back. You were able to get your sleep back, together with a 10 hours sleep, Because I mean we all massaged that a little bit differently. Coming out of the weekend. You just like did binge sleeping.

Speaker 3:

I did Well. I slept Sunday after the race for till about 5pm and then I went home and then I slept again from like 9pm to like 7 or 8 in the morning and I kind of half worked on Monday I hope no one in my job is listening to this, but it was first day back at work after a week off. So you know, I kind of took it easy. But yeah, it took a little bit, but I'm back in the groove, back in normal schedule, thank goodness.

Speaker 1:

Alright, and Riles, since we're talking about it, I got most of my sleep actually last night because there was football on Sunday that I wanted to watch when I got home, so I forced myself to stay awake and then the national championship game Shout out to all those Michigan fans. We saw a lot of you over the weekend, didn't see too many Washington fans and again Washington fans. You ended up one of the last two teams standing, so be happy about that. That was a great Michigan team. But happy national championship to those Michigan folks. Riles, when did you? Because I packed it into about the nine hours sleep last night.

Speaker 4:

I watched Dolphinsville Sunday night, went to bed after that, woke up about 4.30, got on the road by 5.30 was back up here, you know, around 2 o'clock, emory. Thankfully yesterday we had a weather day because we had a huge, massive storm come through. There's all sorts of flooding in the area. So she got off of school yesterday, which was perfect. So we got to spend the day together yesterday and then she went in two hours late today. But yeah.

Speaker 4:

I've been so comfortable, I caught up on my sleep on my lactose intolerance, which apparently I have over the weekend experience. Wow, it only took me three days to eliminate what other things could be, and then it turned out to be whole milk. That literally made me very, very nauseous three days in a row and I felt so soft, so weak. But at least I've identified it and it's gone now.

Speaker 1:

Well, I mean, you seemed soft and weak. We didn't want to get into it.

Speaker 1:

Now you did a great job overcoming that. I have done weekends where I felt sick too. That's not a lot of fun. On one of those long weekends Mine was yesterday Finally my lovely wife went out to dinner with friends and I'm like I'm going to have a glass of wine at 7 o'clock and I fell asleep by about 7.45 and woke up like three hours later and then went to bed. Yeah, so all caught up, all right, let's get into this weekend. It will be a memorable weekend, given the weather challenges we had. But let's start at the beginning 5K. Would we all agree that the highlight of the 5K and I'll throw this out to you first, riles, because you were down there with him were the bagpipes?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I can't remember the gentleman's name, but he was in full regalia, the kilt, I mean he just looked fantastic and you know he was holding the bagpipes properly, or at least it looked like. I mean, he looked so authentic I didn't think that it was going to be a big deal to put him on the spot and actually ask him to play, and hopefully it was something that he was actually looking forward to doing. And it turned out to be exactly that he actually could play the bagpipes very, very well, played a couple of numbers and it just it made our morning. It was terrific.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, now I think everybody's asking for bagpipes for the national anthem. I think there's. That has to happen at some point. All right, trace for the 5K for you. What was your most memorable moment in the 5K?

Speaker 3:

I don't know if there's anything really specific. Bagpipes are definitely cool. That is Dan. Actually, he is married to my friend Stephanie.

Speaker 4:

Oh, all right, oh, hi Dan.

Speaker 3:

I met Stephanie randomly one day at Epcot and she's like are you one of the run Disney announcers? And we proceeded to drink halfway around the world drinking Anyway.

Speaker 1:

It's a dry January for Trace, so just point that out.

Speaker 3:

Ten days, ten days.

Speaker 3:

And I think that's about the million six times. She mentioned it from the stage. This is going to be kind of selfish, but for me the highlight of the 5K was working with Kree for the first time at the finish line. I learned so much from that brilliant human and he's just so talented and really knows his stuff and he took me under his wing and I've done finish line by myself so many times and having him like explain to me the difference between a hand crank and the other. See, this is how bad I am that I forget.

Speaker 1:

Push rim.

Speaker 3:

Push rims and all that, and then every athlete that comes by is like did you know that this person has done this 87,000 times and did this in Kona? And blah, blah, blah, and it's just like I was in awe watching that human. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Well, and Riley, the great thing about Kree is not only has he done a lot of race announcing, but he has been a participant, he's been a race director. I mean, he has worn so many hats and we should let you know if, in case you weren't there and you didn't hear, kree Kelly, our lovely friend and veteran race announcer and, as I just said, race director and all those things, announced that this would his 30th Walt Disney World Marathon weekend, that this was going to be his last as an official announcer, so we had to say goodbye to him. But yeah, he, riley, he wears so many hats that that really gives you because you're a big picture guy too he helps give big picture to what's going on, not just start line, finish line. There's so much more that's happening.

Speaker 4:

I think that one of our most important roles as hosts race hosts is to provide context, provide framing for the event, to let everybody know that your, what you're doing, is gigantic and you are part of a gigantic scene here.

Speaker 4:

So know your role, your place in it, you know love and thrive within it, and he does such a great job of doing that. And also, just on a personal level, it's so great to work with a guy who you know Virginia Military Institute, his background in the military, you know serving in Vietnam, like my brother. I mean the stuff that he's seen, the stuff he's been through via war and his you know, his battle with cancer. Again, for the race hosts, it puts our experience into such context because there we are standing in the trailer with a guy like three who's been through it all. If you're struggling, if you're tired or whatever, it puts that in perspective really, really quick. All you have to do is look at him and he's this example of oh no, no, no, okay, that's all right. If he can do that, if he's been through what he's been through, then what the hell am I complaining about? Right?

Speaker 1:

Sorry, lost my mic there for the while and it was fun to read him comments of people who are complaining about shortening of courses and everything and seeing increased head and the kind of he's making about really, really, you think you think that let me, let me, let me tell you about no, let me talk about that, so anyway let me tell you, walking up to a Huey for the first time, about to be dropped off in the middle of the you know, right, yeah, right.

Speaker 1:

How about that? About my freshman year at VMI? You want to talk about that? I'm going to talk about overcoming, so anyway, shout out to Korea. We'll talk a little bit more about him later. We will miss him, but certainly understand he's getting married in Kenya. Carissa will be there and we just we love he Korea, we love Renee. Shout out to both of them.

Speaker 2:

All right.

Speaker 1:

So let's move on to the 10k, and I'm going to be really, really honest with you guys about the 10k. What I remember most was thinking about what we were going to have to do for the half marathon because the weather for the half I mean, we got that report early and again, for those of you who may not have been here to Central Florida though I assume most people listening were weather reports in Florida, are they're? They're good for about 15 minutes and then and then it's ever changing. So for 10k and and I'll start with you this time, rouse, what is your biggest memory of the 10k? I know we had the country bear singer. That was outstanding, but I was basically on stage and in my mind the whole time thinking oh God, what's the half going to be like? What are we going to have to do for the half?

Speaker 4:

I think there were a lot of people that I want to say that they were distracted, but I think there were a lot of people who obviously had their minds on what's going to happen the next morning. The 10k was a joy. The people that stood out to me you already mentioned, you know, the big Al, which it took a long time to get through, but we got through it and hopefully it was worth it. Also, I want to mention the folks from Ops and Spoon. They just give me life, because the first night I think they were raccoons and it's about five or six of them, and for the 10k they were a baseball team and I forget the name of the baseball team that. They were great. For the half they were all Ronald McDonald characters and one of them was a, was dressed as Ronald McDonald and it scared the scary Ronald McDonald.

Speaker 4:

But I believe, I believe her husband, jared, the two of them and I think there's other family members involved. But they just dress up, they do it every single race and again they just give me and everybody else so much joy. So that was my highlight.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and Trace, you spent a lot more time than we did at the finish line. We were sending off the waves and you got to the finish line earlier. And one of the things that I sort of recognized, specifically coming up on 10k day because again I was so in my head about what we were going to have to deal with the next day and when we would actually find out what we were going to have to deal with, was a question how joyous the finish lines were for this weekend.

Speaker 3:

Oh my gosh, they were incredible and there were so many people who it was their first race, whether it was the five or the full. So many people finishing and just tears of joy at the end. I love the finish line so much because you really see the effort that people put into it, whether they're a veteran runner or that's their first time.

Speaker 3:

It's just gorgeous, but for me my, biggest 10k was meeting Kyle and Brett Pease, who I know was they were on your podcast. I know Karissa had already met them. I didn't know who they were, I just saw them and getting to meet them was really great and understanding what they do, and it really reinforces the fact that it is a privilege that we are able to do this, and for the runners, for us, for everybody. And since I've met them, it's really changed my perspective. I mean not that I'm a negative person at all, but I'm definitely more focused on when things are hard. You know, it's still a privilege. Everything is a privilege. So I they just changed my whole perspective on life. So thank you to those guys and it was such an honor to meet them.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, kyle and Brett on one of the earlier and actually did not have an opportunity to interview him. Karissa did that on their own, but listening to that it is really, really remarkable. For those of you who maybe haven't done that, they are brothers that run and it's Kyle right. Who's in? Who is the physically disabled? I believe he's.

Speaker 3:

A cerebral palsy.

Speaker 1:

Cerebral palsy. Yes, he has cerebral palsy, but he and his brother Brent, they go. They've done Iron man, they've done they do all kinds of distance races. I believe this is the first time they made their way to Disney, so it was really, really great to see them. And and you're right, she Trace is right it's one story after another that we hear people and people go oh, what's the most inspiring story? You really can't nail it down because the stories go everywhere, from hip replacement three weeks ago when I'm running, to the young lady who was the most memorable to me was the young lady who was running the dopey, I believe, and was having chemotherapy after each race.

Speaker 4:

Radiation.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, there was a yeah, radiation, excuse me Well, no, and there might have been somebody who was having chemo after every race, but yeah, that particular woman was having was having going going racing, running in the morning, going to radiation, then coming back and running the next day. Yeah Well, something that DW because I think this might be a perfect time to share this, something that DW said on Facebook, just moved me and I'm so glad to be recognized about this. Run Disney is more these this is his quote. Run Disney is more than the miles. It's about the people. It's about my fellow athletes, it's about the Pacers, the Disney characters, the, the Disney cast members, the volunteers. It's also about the culture that these four have created and protect and nurture. And the four people that he was talking about was John, Lisa Tracy and me. And, of course, we can bring all the other hosts into that, we can bring Mark Thraera into that, we can bring Matthew Hamill into that as well. But that, to me, is what's starting to really read. Is that? And I was talking to Michelle about this just the other night, and I would love to hear your, your thoughts on this.

Speaker 4:

Back in the day, when I first started for years, it was all about keeping it fun, keeping it light, keeping it energetic, keeping it moving. What's your goal? Did you, did you train blah, blah, blah? What's your personal goal today? It was all wrapped up in the, in the nomenclature of running, and that's fine and there's definitely a place for that and we don't want to lose that.

Speaker 4:

But the fact now that run Disney literally has transformed into people being comfortable enough, safe enough to share their personal stories, whether it's struggles with emotions, mental health or physical health, where they were 10 years ago in a very different spot, where they are now, that journey, I think it's just added such a new dimension, a new level of of of what am I looking for? That ethos, pathos, pathos, but in a good way, I mean all that's. It just brought everybody together to hear these stories, to know what their fellow athletes are going through, and I am just so proud that we have been allowed to nurture that, to protect that and to build that, that, that that part of the run Disney family, to allow that to flourish and for everyone to be able to hear those stories. I think it's added a brand new, a whole different level to this entire experience.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's absolutely true. And am I a bad person? Because when you said ethos, pathos, I wanted to say Aramis and mention that the three musketeers is one of my favorite books of all time. And the Richard Lester movies are absolutely brilliant If you haven't seen them. Tracy's looking cross-eyed at us now.

Speaker 4:

We're the four musketeers for the run Disney family.

Speaker 1:

If we can be dressed, is there? There's a musketeer, right, because if I could be dressed as a, I still think the three musketeers, the musical is the musical that needs to be made and I need to be in it, though Now I'm like Cardinal Richelieu or the, the, the corpse of King Louis the 12th or whatever run.

Speaker 4:

Run Disney family all for one and one for all.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely Should be pointed out that really the biggest, the biggest issue for the 10 K was the fact that I was not dressed as Thomas O'Malley, the alley cat from the Aristocats.

Speaker 4:

How does that happen, John? It's passive aggressiveness. I think you did it on purpose.

Speaker 1:

Mark Ferrera, who you mentioned, and Matthew Hamill, the director of ours. Matthew, previous director, Mark the director. Now he's also one of our closest friends. He's been in my wedding. As Israeli, I have said repeatedly that the Aristocats is my favorite animated Disney feature.

Speaker 2:

Repeatedly.

Speaker 1:

That you know in a perfect world and I know it's not a perfect world, and maybe that was the lesson I needed to learn from Mark Ferrera Maybe he needed to do that. It's not a perfect world. Tracy, however, was dressed as one of the cats from Aristocats, but but we really have to move on, because I don't want to. I don't want to focus. We're focusing on the positive. We're not going to focus on the negative. His name is Mark Ferrera. Search him on social media Hashtag. Why isn't John dressed as Thomas?

Speaker 3:

O'Malley and somebody brought you a sign.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And I have the sign. I have kept the sign and I may bring it to every race from now on. So, all right. Moving on, and, as mentioned, people love it when they get like a behind the scenes. Look at what we do.

Speaker 1:

So, 10k day, we knew weather was coming in for half marathon, so I'm going to give everybody a peek inside of thinking oh what, what was going on? What? Here's what we knew. There was weather that was going to be coming in. Producers and directors were all hanging out with us.

Speaker 1:

What we knew was that there were several contingencies being looked at depending on what the weather was going to be. And again, in Central Florida, lightning is the biggest issue, as we saw on full marathon day. You can run through a cloudburst and all of you had to out of nowhere, but lightning is a big problem and it's not just a problem people have to understand for the athletes, it's the volunteers, the race staff. They get there much earlier, some of them up all night, and being able to get things in place for that. So what we knew when we walked away from the 10k and I will speak for everyone here, because Austin and splits my podcast out in the Chris and my podcast is that we knew that there were several contingencies looked at, looked at, obviously, the worst being that we would have to cancel. We didn't think that would be the case. The other was that the shortening of the race might happen and then possibly an earlier start. So we found out the same time, really, that everyone else found out it had already. I found out actually because somebody had gotten the digital program guide, or whatever they call it, the digital race guide and it had already popped up there before it popped up, because I was monitoring social media, I knew at some point we'd get a text letting us know, but we so I don't know what time does anybody remember what time, those around maybe 435 o'clock in the afternoon that that message came through that, all right, we're going to be shortening the race and starting 15 minutes earlier.

Speaker 1:

Then, because we're curious to those things I don't know about you, drace, but I know Riley and I immediately went to social media to see what the responses to all of this were going to be, and I will say there were. Obviously people were disappointed, as as were we, even though we were going to get off earlier in the next day. We'd have a little bit longer to relax. We're all disappointed that we can't do all of it because people first time, so many first time half marathoners, first time, dopey, you know you want to, you want to go the distance and so many people went the distance on their own the, the, the extra distance which was remarkable, to watch people running in the parking lot and whatnot.

Speaker 1:

But I just want to shout out to those people because there were there were some, obviously, there were some trolling, as there always is on social media people who weren't even involved in the race saying, oh, let's just rip off. You need, you know, ask for your money back the. The number of people who chimed in with positive response to them, like walk Safety is obviously the first issue for anyone, and particularly, let's be honest, a large corporation with a lot of responsibility towards the safety of the people who are taking part in an event which can be inherently physically difficult and there are a lot of challenges going on. I was just really really taken aback by how much positive support the one Disney decision got online and I'll start with you, trace. How did you feel, because I know we all talked about that how did you feel about the response from the Run Disney community?

Speaker 3:

Honestly, I was terrified to go out to the shoots because I was nervous, actually reading social media, that people would be so upset and take it out on me because I'm out there. But nobody did. I am also lucky because I usually hang out around Corral A and B so they're more experienced runners. But everyone was super happy and they were just grateful that they were able to do at least a little bit instead of getting canceled, because I know a few years back the half got canceled, correct.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, the half was canceled, I think 2000,. Maybe 17 or 18.

Speaker 3:

A lot of them had run that or were going to run that and they were like you know. I'm just glad we get to do a little bit of it. And I will say, for those listening, even though it didn't seem like a lot of rain and whatnot, there was lightning in the area Just because it wasn't near us. There's some rule. I don't know what the rule is. It's like six miles, five miles.

Speaker 1:

I think it's 10. Is it 10?

Speaker 3:

But it has to be that far because it can affect a lot of people. But for the most part everyone was super grateful. I mean, the only negative I saw was on social, so I never saw it personally and I talked to a lot of people at the start line, so I'm glad it was awesome.

Speaker 1:

Yeah and Riles, I think we all had that going into. When there's a shortened race or we have to let people know bad news and stuff, we always worry, just like Tracy said, that people are going to take it out on us and that's fine. I mean, if you want to yell at me, you know, if you think I made that decision and you're not paying attention. But again, the support that we got online from the people who were really upset about it all and explaining to some people who said things like well, can't they just start later? And that seems like we could. But when you take into account you're running through different theme parks that are open for guests who have nothing to do with this.

Speaker 4:

You have volunteers out there, you have people who are working specific shifts it's not that easy to make a change and we got again so much support from our Run Disney family on appreciating that we made a decision that gave people, if not their entire event more than half of their of their miles and and keeping them safe at the finish line, which is really what we're just to just repeat that any, any negative comment I saw on social media or anyone who was just clueless talking about start the race later or start the race tomorrow or any of those things where they don't take into account any of the logistics. All they're thinking about is this is my experience and again we get that. We get the disappointments. We get my God to work and to train and maybe this was your first one and then it gets taken away from you by an act of God, mother Nature.

Speaker 4:

That's tough to deal with, but in every one of those cases where someone was complaining or someone was saying why can't they just do this, or why can't or I'd be done with my race in time, there was a sea of people calling them out, just reminding them that, look, it's not just about you.

Speaker 4:

This is a collective, this is a community and we can't, we can't start the race the next day because equipment literally has been rented and has to go. Back. To your point, john, there are all sorts of cast members and volunteers who want to go on with their day. They want to get back to their families by a certain time. Maybe they need to get back home by a certain time You're asking everyone to be, to extend and be complete. It's just, it's just not possible. So just to wrap that up, I was very heartened that, yeah, nobody came after any of us as far as I know, and every time I saw any sort of negativity on social media, the community came in and said this is why you can't do that. So that was, that was.

Speaker 1:

And again, the finish line was as joyous as I remember.

Speaker 4:

I remember dancing in the rain Well just playing, playing, you know, playing the all every rain song imaginable. People got into it and you're right, I've never seen as many people crossing that finish line, singing the lyrics, dancing. So credit to him, credit to everybody, for handling that just about as well as you could.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we love Stevie. And shout out to the fact that when I requested Fool in the Rain by Led Zeppelin, play the whole damn song. Yes, didn't cut it at the bridge, play the whole song, because that bridge goes to a samba and people were dancing for the samba for that.

Speaker 1:

So, yeah, I honestly I said that 20 years of doing this and which I hadn't realized until Chris and I got there though I've probably been told a thousand times 20 years doing it I do not remember people being as joyous and fun at the finish line through a rainstorm yeah, at times a really annoying rainstorm and at other times it was. You know, it kind of backed off a little and and just seemed a little misty. But, riley, have a question. Thank you for raising your hand.

Speaker 4:

Just I want to bring attention to cheer squad as well, because cheer squad was out there from before dawn. They sat through the rain, they sat through, you know, all that weather that came through they did it again on Sunday when we got even a heavier rain that nobody expected. But folks at cheer squad, all the folks that stayed out there in the course cheering their athletes, cheering all the run Disney family credit to those folks as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it was. It was, it was unique and, as I said, I said to Jeff Galloway about the weekend. It's like you know, even the people who are like oh, so disappointing, they're going to remember this one. They may do 10 Disney marathon weekends and this will be one of the top two or three that they remember because it was. You know, a little catch is catch can on that half marathon day and then we can now segue into the big dog, the full marathon, where we thought, hey, we've a big dog, hey, we've overcome all of our weather challenges, this is going to be outstanding. And then we literally had an old Testament cloud burst for about an hour that dumped more water that I have seen on the course so quickly. So let's get to the full. First of all, trace, let's, let's step back a little bit, because it was your first weekend working the whole damn thing full morning of the full. What were you feeling and what was that like?

Speaker 3:

I was excited, I was grateful for the extra couple hours of sleep that we got because them the half was shortened. But, holy cow, that is a long day. I was nervous, I was. I. At one point I looked at my watch so I was getting tired and it was only 1030. And I'm like, oh my, we have a lot to go. But then, as the later corral started coming into the finish, my energy got, you know, rebooted. Just it was like taking the Red Bull, because again it's, you know, everyone's super happy. The music's pumping, the beers are starting to come through the finish line like it's a party and and it was a blast. But, holy cow, that's exhausting. That it is really exhausting.

Speaker 1:

And you have to put into. I just put into, put it in my mind, is you know? For as exhausted as I am, there are people out there running 26.2 miles, which I still believe is humanly impossible, and that this is all done with CGI. But again I've been disabused of that fact. Yeah, how about you, riles? It seemed to me like everybody was really really extra pumped because of the problems we went through on on half and it really looked like we were going to have a nice dry run to the finish.

Speaker 4:

I thought I thought the rain because you know kind of came in and got out, even though it was a deluge kind of you know added an extra layer of romance or epicness or something you know just a different dimension, a different depth to that whole day. So I thought that was fun. Thank God it came in and got out pretty quickly and then the sun came out and it was an all weekend long. Other than the rain, other than the lightning issues. I think everybody had to be very, very happy with just how cool it was, not just for the races in the morning, but just all day long. I mean I think the whole marathon weekend experience. Except for a couple of pockets of bad weather, the temperatures were just absolutely gorgeous and I think people's mood reflected that.

Speaker 4:

Tracy, when you talk about being exhausted, yeah, I mean we used to be out there for the whole time. You know we were parent, we were too paranoid to go back and take breaks in the trailer. We would certainly pace ourselves, but we would be out there for that entire, you know, finish line experience. And you know it's kind of a happy, sad thing that thankfully now they put us on grids to where we actually have break times, which we need, but that also takes you off the course when maybe some of the people that you've been talking with all you know all weekend long come through. So that's the only negative about that. But as far as just our working situation, very, very grateful for the grids and very, very grateful for just for what you guys have already said. Everybody just seemed to be a buoyant. They were in such great moods all weekend long, no matter what.

Speaker 2:

Travis.

Speaker 4:

Travis and kill I mean Travis and you know just that just killed me. That was just the best. Absolutely yes, travis and Taylor Swift. And, by the way, the guy who was playing Taylor and got the lyrics wrong. He's raised like over six figures for difference charities as well, so we want to give a shout out to that guy because he was very, very funny, but also very funny in service of a good, good cause.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely you actually said about you told me to take a break. You're like you're on break and I didn't leave and you're like you need to go and break. I'm like I can't. My friends coming through and like.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, well, you all need to take our breaks is otherwise we make everybody else look that.

Speaker 1:

I know.

Speaker 4:

It's like a union situation you know, nobody can do the gig for less money.

Speaker 3:

I just also For the yeah, exactly I was out there. I didn't talk, so I was saving my that's.

Speaker 1:

The other thing is only so many voices at a time and we get out there because we have Carol, we have Carolina and Corey as well. So try to break it up a little. And it is sad when you miss some of your friends, but I was pretty lucky. The vast majority of people that I say that I know. At the finish line I was able to see. So those of you that I didn't, so sorry. Hopefully you'll be back for princess or springtime surprise. So yeah, it was. It was very memorable.

Speaker 1:

Final, as mentioned Cree Kelly, 30 of these marathons and just talking to him about when it all started and the fact that no one had any idea that it was going to become what it, what it is now, and so it was great to get to walk Cree over the finish line for his final Walt Disney World Marathon and, just just the again, shout out to all the folks in the cheer zone who, many of them, stood there through through the deluge, to quote the living sea. The living seas, that's, that's still a thing, right, the living seas. I haven't been up to the front end of Epcot in a while. I generally, I generally come in from, I think the living seas right anyway, help me out.

Speaker 3:

That's just the giant aquarium thingy, right yeah yeah, exactly, exactly, exactly.

Speaker 1:

One of my favorite is one of my favorite things, but they have. They have that, I'm sure the people that work there really appreciate it be referred to.

Speaker 4:

That's just the giant aquarium thing, right. I'm sorry, it's when you come out of there with degrees man, they're scientists, all right, all right. They're re biologists, they're oceanographers. My God, tracy, don't be so reductive.

Speaker 3:

I mean, it's beautiful and I like it. I just I'd rather ride, ride, sorry.

Speaker 1:

I just don't think you're ever going to get a role as a marine biologist in a film. Just because you've, you've really the morning theologist really I'm Asian.

Speaker 3:

I played scientists a million times and I will again.

Speaker 1:

And mathematicians, I'm sure, all right. So that was a marathon it was. It was indeed memorable, also memorable in in another way. I want to shout out to all of our anthem singers, monica Quinn and Elodie Germain. What is it? Michael Santiago was a no, no, no, and you know what?

Speaker 4:

he was just a word, christopher, here she'd be able to but I was shot at Michael because he was great.

Speaker 1:

but then on Marathon Day, for all of those disnerds out there, the dapper dance singing the National Anthem Definitely a highlight. I have introduced national anthem singers in the past where they've gotten polite golf clap applause. It was explosive applause for the Dapper Dance because somebody that people actually know.

Speaker 3:

Right, oh, and it was beautiful to see them when they did that. But I saw them at rehearsal and I actually videoed the whole thing because I'm just like, oh my gosh, I get to see the Dapper Danes right in front of me singing a national anthem. It's so epic.

Speaker 1:

They killed, they killed. And again shout out to all of our Anthem singers because again, if you know and all three of us right now on this podcast have musical theater backgrounds and the idea of singing the national anthem at 4.55 in the morning, 4.54 in the morning is brutal For me and you know, you know me, I treat my body like a rodeo, not an athlete. Don't enjoy running out to the shed and it's only about 100 yards from where I am right now. If you said to me all right, you got two choices you got to run a half marathon and you got to sing national anthem 4.55. Acapella at 4.55 in the morning. I'm like, can you give me a minute?

Speaker 1:

And the third choice is we remove a limb, I'm like, ooh, all, right now see you got me thinking which would you choose?

Speaker 1:

I'd probably try to sing the anthem but, I, can. Only. You know, in my mind it's, it's. They did a. I talked to Riley about this. They did some survey recently and there's some ridiculous survey that says like 65, 75% of adult men believe that if something happened to the pilot while you're flying on a plane, on a passenger jet, you could I could land the plane. You know that. It's so ridiculous you couldn't. We're all doomed.

Speaker 4:

I think if somebody, if somebody in the tower is talking you through it I've seen enough movies, I've seen enough you know daytime television that if somebody's in the tower talking you through it, you know you could do it, you could do it?

Speaker 1:

Sure Okay, I seem to think that probably I couldn't If I really think about it. And the other thing is I think that, oh gosh, no one shows up to do the anthem. I could do that, probably, couldn't. I'm sure I would forget the words I Enrico Palazzo.

Speaker 4:

The whole thing, that's the thing, john and Tracy, is that it's not just being able to yeah, it's not just being able to technically sing at that hour when all of us, your body's just used to being asleep, it's also, you know, yeah, I'm going to forget that. If there's ever a time to forget the words or reverse something, it's at, you know, 435 o'clock in the morning, my God.

Speaker 3:

Random story, but when I was in college, I sang the national anthem at a volleyball tournament a pro volleyball tournament and I didn't grow up in this country. I moved here when I was 18, and I actually had a cheat sheet on my shoe. That's smart Nice.

Speaker 4:

I sang the anthem before a football game once and got through it, but it was terrifying.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, I was, because there have been a couple of events that I've done at Disney where it's like, where's the? Where are I'm going to be anthem singer? And everybody's like, all right, john, you talk, you have a musical theater tattoo, let's go, brother. And I'm just looking at the DJ going. You have an instrumental version of this. Right, you can do something, you can play, because I don't know I could get through it.

Speaker 1:

So shout out to all those games Again Monica, elodie, michael and the Dapper Danse, whose names I don't know, but I'm going to call them Luke, david, peter and Paul, that's who they were. The.

Speaker 3:

Dapper.

Speaker 1:

Apostles, nice work out of you guys. All right, since Karissa's not here, let's do it what? Yep, absolutely. Weston Galloway, our producer, emeritus editor, really the one responsible for any success that this podcast is having. And our guests said hey, you know, do you have a favorite Karissa story? And I was going to throw it all out to you guys and we're going to have our favorite. But there is only one favorite Karissa story from this weekend.

Speaker 1:

For those of you who may not have seen, we were dressed as Chip and Dale, karissa and I, for 10K. Love the great costumes, really enjoyed them. Doesn't make up for the Thomas O'Malley thing, but that's another story for another day. There was someone dressed as Chip or Dale. They didn't have the nose, so we couldn't tell what it was. And you know, if you're on stage enough, you can both. At some point you're going to say something that's either stupid, inappropriate, double entendre, and sometimes you might be able to touch on all of those things. Now I don't think what Karissa said was stupid. So she was two for three with the vaguely inappropriate thing she said because he had a little bag. The gentleman who was running had like a little bag, maybe to put his phone in and maybe a water bottle something, and it was dressed up like the costume. It was essentially part of the costume and Karissa said from the stage, and oh my God, I wish I had a drum roll. She said look, he's also got some place to put his nuts.

Speaker 4:

That's legit.

Speaker 1:

That's science. Sit there for a minute, and the problem with that is when you're working with somebody that you've worked with for 20 years and you know, and you can all attest this being on stage. Sometimes we live for that thing. That goes wrong when you're up there, because it just keeps you focused and there's always a place. So Karissa said that and then we made eye contact and at that point we couldn't speak. So we had I think we had to throw it down to you, riley, to kind of get us out of that.

Speaker 4:

No, and I'm laughing too, but that was my favorite moment.

Speaker 4:

Oh yeah, and the best moment for us, for our crew, you know, of the entire weekend. And that's the thing, man, you know we're all live performers and the first rule of live performance, I think in any way, is, if you f up feature it, don't act like it didn't happen. I understand that if it's just simply a television broadcast and you can edit around it that maybe you don't want to bring attention to it, but if it's a live thing on stage in any way, shape or form, and something goes wrong or somebody says something that's funny, you got to feature you can't ignore it. And I think that the audience, whether it's in a theater or whether it's run Disney, I think they appreciate it when they see everybody on stage having a good, good time. I think it's authentic, I think it's real, I think people appreciate it. Tracy, would you agree with that?

Speaker 3:

Absolutely Now. Yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

I wish I had been there for that moment, though I that's all, the best part of it for me other than making eye contact and knowing that she was going to lose it and I was the best part for me was that kind of about three quarters of a second where no one had any response to it, because it has to work in your mind going is that really what just was? And then and then it's sort of built. And so shout out to Carissa for the funniest moment, clearly, of the weekend. And also we should take a shout out because we mentioned Tracy, your first full marathon weekend. But we also added in a new member of the team, riley, and I fairly certain he's there to replace one of us sooner than later.

Speaker 1:

Oh it's coming Our friend Matt Pablo, who did a fantastic job and he really it only shadowed, like I think he shadowed one pre-show at Wine and Dine weekend and then really kind of just got dropped into the mix. And I I know you guys agree, but I can't say enough about what a great job Matt did. He's a total pro.

Speaker 4:

I was out there with him for the most part. He had a lot of great questions and then, you know, when it was time to deliver, he delivered. And he has that thing, you know, even though some of us, especially when we first started, we have a tendency to go on for too long. Certainly, I do this on podcasts, but, but his stuff was pretty measured and and the bottom line is he has that thing. You know, we've all seen people on stage on camera who had just done. It doesn't translate. They give me great in the green room, they give me great rehearsals, but it doesn't come across on camera and that kid just simply has that presence on camera, on stage that you can't teach. So, yes, agreed totally about Matt Pablo.

Speaker 3:

Oh, and he's so much energy and I have to give him kudos to because, on the full he came from a gig in St Pete directly to the full. That kid had no sleep and was still his energy level was perfect and he was just great and just kudos to him and I really enjoyed working with him.

Speaker 4:

I just think, to get back to Carissa, that punchy Carissa is the best Carissa, because she's a total pro. She stands up on that stage and there is never, ever a pause. You know, you, johnny, you can take a little break, or you know, I mean she just she takes the stage, she's got stuff that she wants to get across, she wants to inspire people, but then all of a sudden, something will catch your eye or she'll say something, or one of us will say something, and she gets a little punchy and silly and it changes her physically. She'll start making moves on stage and I just I don't know. I love it, I think it's hilarious.

Speaker 1:

Right, I still. I still need her to explain to me what bagpipe style is. She goes, let's dance bag bag style and I just looked at her like I don't know what that means.

Speaker 4:

Oh, and she got down to start doing this weird hip-hop move.

Speaker 1:

It was great, yeah, yeah it was, it was, it was, it was weird and something that we need to revisit in in later races. Yeah, the funny thing is, after she said the the nuts, the nuts moment, it's just be referred to as the nuts moment. Then she turned to me when I think we do or dry, and was going to try to explain what she meant and I was just like no, no no, no, no no no, don't, don't, there's no point.

Speaker 4:

Fun. You know what I mean.

Speaker 1:

It's nobody's getting offended by that. It's hilarious, of course, and if they are, whatever yeah, I'm flying pig.

Speaker 1:

Right, oh my god, I learned so much about flying pig. I had to. I had to go and look it up because so many people Mentioned and it's like, ah, you want, you want to run in a thunderstorm, here you go, people have at it. So, all right, before we we get to the mail bag and you guys are gonna hang for the mail bag. Favorite interview of the weekend and we may have touched on this earlier, but you know my memory is I don't know we could talk about battle Gettysburg, but I remember the beginning of this interview, trace, did we? You mentioned the piece without your favorite interview of the weekend or your favorite moment with a with an athlete or Athletes?

Speaker 3:

I would say that's in the top three. But I think one of my favorites is this gentleman, william, who I met either at springtime or at wine and dye and I saw him again this year. And this gentleman I don't know what it is about him, but we just had this connection and he's actually, he says, gonna be my new financial planner because that's what he does for living. But this gentleman, I would say, is in his late 50s, early 60s, just started running like five years ago, has lost over 200 pounds and is now an, a corral, and Most of the people in a are, you know, are younger and, you know, super in shape. And I mean he's in shape, obviously, but not you know what I mean. He's like normal.

Speaker 1:

He's normal and and just we're calling you, we're calling you elite runners, abnormal. We've just done it.

Speaker 3:

They are, let's be honest, a lot of these things like zero body fat, and I run a seven mile. So, talking to this gentleman, it was really cool to be able to reconnect with somebody and it wasn't like Like kind of going back to what we're talking about as run Disney becoming family. This gentleman was not just a runner at a race who I'd met before, like we have actually become friends. We're not connected on social media or anything, but it's like it felt like, oh my gosh, I haven't seen you and, like you know, seeing a college friend again and and just being able to reconnect what's going on in your life, what's going on in my? And that, to me, was probably one of my favorites because I just felt at home and it felt like I was with a buddy and Definitely the pieces learning about their foundation was Amazing and I've actually gone to their website late three times.

Speaker 3:

I'm like how can I help? And I really want to help and one of the things actually that they I'm kind of veering off a little bit, but one of the ways to help is like these, like if you can volunteer your legs to run a half marathon with our athletes, and I actually thought about it and I'm like maybe I should start training it in and I could volunteer for the peace foundation and run with a disabled athlete. We shall see.

Speaker 1:

I don't think I'm fast enough to commit to it, commit to it on the podcast, commit to it on the I don't know fast enough.

Speaker 3:

Even at my fastest I only ran like an 11 minute mile. So I don't know, with pushing a A chair, if that would slow me down a lot. I would assume. Yes, but I can try. I'm gonna head out into the universe and let the universe tell me what to do.

Speaker 1:

You're the only one of the three of us has ever run a half marathon, so if anybody's gonna commit to, it's gonna be you how about you Riles. You remember and I do remember why the 200 pound guy, cuz I just was thought you know I need to lose like 25 pounds and it just honestly you might as well told me I need to get to the top amount. Ever since then you hear about that and you're like, okay, all right.

Speaker 4:

Look, I you know this is something I don't know and I'm gonna find out about me. I've spent a lot of time running from the police back in the day, but I don't know, I've never done it formally in a race, so we'll see if all that stuff comes back for me dress, riley.

Speaker 1:

What if I dress as like a police officer and and chase you okay?

Speaker 4:

All right, little motivation. That's what my brother's gonna do up here. Well, I trained for the 5k in the spring. Is that he's gonna? He's gonna, he's gonna dress he's? We've got some of my dad's old, you know police uniforms and he's gonna run around tracing, chasing me.

Speaker 4:

For me, there was a couple of guys, a couple of people come to mind. There was Glenn that's this one guy's name I remember. Glenn, a year ago had his head open because he was having brain surgery. And this was not a young guy either. Probably our age, maybe, maybe a little older I've got. Probably Glenn was probably in the 60s, but a year ago had his head open, brain surgery, did know if he'd ever run again, and God only knows what else he comes with that when you have brain surgery. And yet there he was, running the half marathon, run the full marathon. It was just absolutely great to see him and to be able to talk him across the line. I think both of you guys will. Everybody will agree that's the best part is when you establish a story and then you're able to see them finish their journey.

Speaker 4:

Lindsay Reed from oxen spoon, another one who years ago had had brain surgery. The doctor literally told her. You'll never run again. And here she is taking part in all these races.

Speaker 4:

One last guy, whose name escapes me, but maybe you'll remember it, but he was one of the guys at the full that said, last year I ran the marathon, I got swept. I'm back to do it again. And we saw that guy cross the finish line and he crossed with a pretty good time. He wouldn't. He wouldn't towards the end. You know, the balloon ladies were nowhere near this guy, so he was ready. And again, just all those stories. And one final thing, john and Tracy, so many people running by, slapping hands, giving hugs, saying thank you for what we do. And again, I am honored, I'm flattered we all are that. You guys would even say that to us. But we mean it every time. We say no, no, no, thank you, because the only reason that we are inspired to say the things we say, to feel the way we feel, is Because the reality on that course, for the 5k, the 10k, the half and the full, it is all about the athletes and we can't thank you guys.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, I was surprised there were people still coming up to me and congratulating me on my 5k. That.

Speaker 2:

I ran back.

Speaker 1:

I'm like are you at the end of their marathon?

Speaker 2:

Are you kidding me?

Speaker 1:

I am a circus clown, honestly, oh my god. So, yeah, thank you. And again, it's just, it really is inspiring and it does get us through the weekend. All right, you guys are gonna hang around For the, for the mail bag, and so I'll pay you off then and thank you. Normally it's Chris and I, but she's out there on the West Coast, probably in the midst of some rehearsal for For for the race out there in Disneyland. Because they are I mean, they do like some sort of major rehearsal scene study. I believe there's a Meisner class that they have to take a drama turd John and Tracy.

Speaker 1:

They have a drama turd, perfect, perfect.

Speaker 3:

Listen up, it's mail call time announcer free present.

Speaker 1:

All right, thank you, sarge. This one comes from Bruno in Colombia, so we really probably shouldn't talk about it, but we're gonna do it anyway. What makes marathon weekend different? I've been to wine and dine in the former Star Wars weekend, but I've always heard there's a different energy around marathon weekend. So, outside of the distance and the extra day, why do you think this is and why should I make it a must on my calendar? You, you guys, want to handle that first, because I have some feelings about that, riles.

Speaker 4:

We felt it the morning of the marathon and it kind of, you know serpentines Self through the whole weekend where, yes, 5k fun, 10k fun, half fun, but a little more work. But man, that morning when people show up to the marathon, there is a different vibe. They're not nearly as playful. It's still a very positive, still very warm and welcoming, safe vibe.

Speaker 4:

But people are focused and when you take that start, you know when you talk to them about did you train, did you not? I mean the, the reality of what they're about to attempt physically Ways on everyone there. And then when you see them at the end of the day, they are, they are changed physically. You see it written all over their faces there, that stitch some of them get where they have to lean to the side and what that makes it that much more moving for all of us, because you realize that, yes, 5k is an incredible achievement, 10k half is an incredibly Incredible achievement. But the marathon is the marathon and, as Jeff Galloway says, running never lies and there is no lying about that marathon and that, I think, permeates everyone's feelings throughout the day.

Speaker 1:

All right, good answer Trace.

Speaker 3:

Well, again, this was my first full marathon weekend, but I think there is a sense of because there is an extra day. You said not talk about the extra day, but I'm gonna, because there is an extra day. There is more time also for camaraderie. I think A lot of people spend more time cheering each other on and whatnot, and even you know those who don't run the full are there to support those who ran the full. And I don't discredit people who run just the 5K or just the 10, and I hate that term just the but they understand how much more difficult the full is. And even the dopey and the goofy my goodness, I can't even fathom the concept but I don't know. There's just a sense of camaraderie that is more intense, I think, during this weekend that I haven't seen in other weekends. Other weekends are super fun, but this, I think, has a little extra focus and a little extra, I don't know, it's just harder. So people understand that and support people more, in my opinion.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, and I didn't say we couldn't talk about the extra day. It's just why is the energy different? And I think I think you both touched on it because Raul's saying you know, you know that this final act of the weekend is going to be daunting for almost anyone, and I mean so many people running dopey and then even the people doing goofy, and it's gonna be daunting because you're now gonna run more than you have the previous two or three days, which is absolutely crazy to me. And then to your point, tracy, what I was gonna say is it's just longer to tell the story, and people have gotten to know some other people that maybe they didn't know. They met them 10K and now we're gonna stay together and help each other.

Speaker 1:

On Marathon Day. I set it from the stage and I've set it on this podcast before. It's the most individual of sports, but when you're out there you feel more supported than I've even the team sports I played way back in high school. There's just something about the level of support that you get when you're out there, when it's an extra day and you know again, we're all theater actors. Second act's supposed to be shorter than the first act and it is. It's much longer and it really is crazy.

Speaker 1:

So that's what I would say to Bruno is that put it on your calendar because it is again an achievement that I will. I'm never gonna run a marathon, I will say this right now, but it is such an achievement and also just being part of that family for that extra day, that seven hours, and when you bring in, when you got out of bed that morning and drove over 11, 12 hours that you've spent with these people and some of you crazy nut jobs, then going to the park afterwards and celebrating it, which I just will not ever understand. You're going to just the aquarium at Epcot maybe I don't know what you're gonna do, just to quote Tracy there, but yeah, it really does. It has a different energy and I think that it's both of those things. So that's what you're gonna do, and then the fact that we're telling the story for an extra day.

Speaker 1:

So I hope that answers it. Bruno, we shouldn't speak of you again because we don't want to get in trouble with our good friends at Pixar and Disney. All right, guys, thank you so much for sitting in for this wrap up weekend. As mentioned, tracy Wu, we will have you back on prior to Princess, so we will get your entire origin story and Riley Clarabot. We've already done that with you.

Speaker 4:

I'm sure you'll be back for the-. Yeah, tracy, just real quick, don't start at birth. Okay, I literally started at Doctor's Hospital in Carl Gables and went through that. I thought they wanted that apparently not, he did.

Speaker 1:

I thought the junior high years, though, riley, most people have chimed in that your junior high years were the part of your story that they most enjoyed.

Speaker 3:

And then it was seventh grade. I've known you for a long time, riley, and I did learn a lot about you listening to that, though, so I'm grateful. I kind of liked it.

Speaker 4:

Thanks, Tracy.

Speaker 1:

All right, well, guys, thanks so much, and I won't see you soon enough. But what are we? Seven weeks?

Speaker 4:

Six weeks away 40 days, 40 days.

Speaker 1:

All right guys. Thanks so much, really appreciate it.

Speaker 4:

Bye by Weston, bye Carissa, bye Hi Tracy.

Speaker 3:

Bye.

Speaker 4:

All right, athletes, here's the drill Time to shape up your diet.

Speaker 2:

Carissa, give them the goods. Well, in today's healthier you moment, we're just going to have a simple tip, and that is to remind you to hydrate, especially if you're coming off those race weekends or if you're still having your focus on princess springtime surprise training over the summer. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. You've heard of the eight, eight ounce glasses of water and there's literally no science behind it. So the best thing to do take your body weight, divide it in half and aim for that many ounces per day. If you are one of those people that simply knows you don't drink enough water, get yourself a larger yeti. If my daughter were here, she would tell you to get a Stanley they're super cool, she says or a big bottle, and that way you can really do a better job of tracking your intake throughout the day, even setting those little alarm reminders on your phone.

Speaker 2:

Hydration goes a long way to performance. It also goes a huge way into fatigue your focus and fighting off feelings of hunger which might lead you to add more carbohydrates into your diet when really you're just thirsty. So cheers to you, get that hydration. And if you want to get a better gauge on your overall nutrition, if your goals for this year are weight loss, more energy or just feeling better. We can do that with healthier you. It's a 12-week online nutrition course. What we're going to do is we're going to give you nutrition education, meal plans, all kinds of good stuff. We are enrolling now. So go ahead and sign up. It's at gallowaycoursecom and use the code PODCAST to save a little money.

Speaker 1:

Hey, if you're new to 321GO or one of our beloved veteran listeners, we want to thank you so very much. We got a lot of really positive feedback this weekend and we really appreciate it. Please subscribe, share on social media and once again, thank you. We also have a new way for you to support us. See the link towards the bottom of the show notes to become a supporter of the show. So thank you, we love you. If you have any ideas for an episode or a chat topic or question, please email us at 321GOpodcastatgmailcom. Once again, that's 321GOpodcast. One word at gmailcom and we will see you real soon. Bye, bobcatman.

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