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Carrie Tollefson: Olympian, Running Broadcaster, and Sharing the Mic with Carissa at the Olympic Trials

January 23, 2024 Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey Season 1 Episode 33
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Carrie Tollefson: Olympian, Running Broadcaster, and Sharing the Mic with Carissa at the Olympic Trials
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Experience the grit and grace of athletic achievement as Olympian Carrie Tollefson takes us through her incredible journey from track star to sports broadcaster. Her story is one of resilience and triumph, facing health challenges and making an astonishing comeback to clasp her place on the US Olympic team. Alongside, my co-host Carissa Galloway and I, John Pelkey, share our own trials and tribulations, balancing the demands of professional careers with the joys and juggles of parenthood.

Travel back in time with us to the Athens Olympic Games, where the shadow of doping scandals loomed large but failed to dim the pure joy of competition. Relive those moments of glory and the agony of deceit through Carrie's vivid recollections. Carrie's transition from Olympic runner to sports broadcasting icon exemplifies the dedication and versatility required to excel in multiple arenas.

Finally, allow us to nourish your curiosity as we uncover the lesser-known hero of athletic wellness – magnesium. We'll guide you through its myriad benefits, from muscle recovery to mental clarity, and suggest ways to incorporate this magical mineral into your diet. Carrie Tollefson bids us farewell, but the motivation and inspiration linger, encouraging us to lace up our sneakers, hit the pavement, and chase down our own Olympic-sized dreams.

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Speaker 1:

Welcome to 3, 2, 1, Go the Podcast. I'm John Pelkey.

Speaker 2:

And I'm Carissa Galloway and we're bringing you stories from start to finish to keep the everyday athlete motivated to keep moving towards the next finish.

Speaker 1:

Okay, today we're kicking off a series of episodes to get you ready for the US Olympic Marathon trials that are happening right here in Orlando, where Carissa will be on the announcing team. And today we have Olympian and broadcaster Cari Tolofson will join us for a great chat about her superb hard for me to say superb running career and how she got behind the mic of literally every major marathon.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I've followed Cari's career for a while, both as a broadcaster and on the track, and we're going to learn a little bit about her competitive spirit and how she navigated some serious challenges on her way to the Olympics. Oh yeah, and we're going to talk a little bit about LeBron James in Athens, in healthier you, we're going to talk about the benefits of the Magical Magnesium and we'll open the mailbag to hear about balancing training and kids. If you have a question for us to answer, if you want to share your story, email us at 321.GoPodcast at gmailcom. Subscribe, shout out to Deah from Icon Fitness. We were at HSN the other day and she said if you have a podcast, I'm going to subscribe. That's the energy I want. Let's do this.

Speaker 1:

All right, Carissa, you're back from the coast, back out of Disneyland, and you got a chance while you were there to go to club 33. Now, for many of us, I had no idea what this was until recently. Please explain how did you get in? Did you throw 50 bucks to the doorman? How did this happen for you?

Speaker 2:

So what's funny is I just Googled it because I don't know like the official, like name of what it is. All I know is that when I went to Disneyland for the first time in 2012, there was this little doorbell that said 33 and I couldn't go in it. It was special, it was not allowed. And what happens when you're not allowed to go somewhere?

Speaker 1:

It's the only thing you want to do.

Speaker 2:

All you want to do. So for years I would go and I would take this picture in front of this club 33 sign, thinking I wanted to go there. Now it comes to find out and what it is most of you know when you're rolling your eyes at us. It is a very exclusive club in Disneyland. It's a lounge. It's an ultra exclusive venue that Walt originally started building because he wanted a quieter place to entertain heads of states or dignitaries or VIPs when they came to Disneyland, so some place that they could go, be in the park but then have this little sort of more private area, if you will.

Speaker 2:

Now it is a club that there is a lot, as I believe, a long waiting list to get into and we're talking exclusively about the one in Disneyland. So you get it's a membership. It is, I don't know the cost of very high cost membership to get into. There's can come anytime. There's a lounge side which is more like a bar atmosphere that you can only go in with a member. So I did not get to go in there. So of course, now I want to do that. The other side is a dinner. It's a four hours was a four course dinner that a member has to make a reservation for you. So you get to go in, you say your name at the doorbell, you're greeted by them, they take you up the elevator, they tell you a little bit about the history of it.

Speaker 2:

Now, walt never actually set foot in the club 33 Disneyland he actually passed away before it happened but it served as the area for his original office and the reason he did that was so he could be at his desk and then see the fireworks. So there is a part of club 33 where you come off the elevator or the stairs and there's an archway. That is all original and that is right where his desk was. So I think that's one of those moments where it's just like you know, you feel everything kind of like standing at Sleeping Beauty Castle. You just feel like I'm in the presence where this man was.

Speaker 2:

That, my gosh, how his vision has transformed my life and people's lives, is really cool. So we had a friend, who I'm not going to name, who was able to get us in, and I felt really cool when I was going to club 33 John. But like a lot of people went Kristen went, michael Gabriel went, the run Disney, who I know has some connections in it. So I still feel special, but like it's like everybody went, not you, you know no one will ever allow me in.

Speaker 1:

They have standards. I've been told it's much like a lot of things where I'm told not to make eye contact with any of the important people because, frankly, why would they want to put up with me? But so cool. How was the food? Most importantly Because I'm just going to say this quite frequently very special things like that that when there's food involved, the food is not the star. How was the food?

Speaker 2:

So two caveats before I say and you probably know what I'm going to say Wes and I are not as foodies like you. We love experiences but like we're not top foodies. Also, our reservation was at 830 PM so for me that was extremely late. So I was a little bit tired but super enjoying the experience. I love the decor. It's decorated in a first empire style which is like Napoleon in the 19th century with some New Orleans nods. So the food, beautifully plated, beautifully constructed, didn't blow me away. But the wine they have a four wine pairing for the four courses. But mama said can I have a 50% wine pairing, because four glasses of wine in like this hour time it's not, john knows.

Speaker 1:

I think I've been with you. I think I've been with you with four glasses of wine in an hour period.

Speaker 2:

And that's where the Cheetos came from.

Speaker 1:

I would fall asleep. I would, literally, I would fall asleep. Four glasses of wine and a meal.

Speaker 2:

So I asked for two. So I had a beautiful glass of champagne and then the red wine that I got was called rain, but I think it was RAE in, I need to look it up. He said it's like the number five on the list and it was just at the perfect temperature. So the wine made it. And then you get to go shopping. So of course you're going to buy things to tell everybody you went to club 33. So I got a lounge fly, a corksicle, westing got a polo, but I'm just so grateful to those who shall not be named that got me in, because it was just an experience that I will forever remember. Just being in that room, I really tried to take in the ambiance. The fireworks started and their fireworks went off in front of New Orleans square, where the phantasm will return to. So we went out in the balcony. We could see the fireworks, so all of that was just made it for a wonderful way to end our Disney trip.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, it sounds really really cool. It was at the Pino, was it the Pino noir? Was that the rain that you got?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, did you Google it.

Speaker 1:

I just Googled it. Yeah, it's about 80.

Speaker 2:

Do you want to? How much is it?

Speaker 1:

It's about 80 bucks for a bottle, at least what I'm having here. That's okay Do you want to we should get one and have.

Speaker 2:

We can do like a fete, we can do. You can make wings and I will bring this bottle, and then we can have our own club 33 that people have to pay thousands of dollars.

Speaker 1:

To come and eat with us $2,000 to have Johnny's wings.

Speaker 2:

I will donate it to charity.

Speaker 1:

And they're air fry wings people. I have an oven with an air fryer in it, so but we know we have to work through all of the because we have a naked wine subscription here and, as you know, kind of doubled up on what we were supposed to get. So we'll have to work our way into the rain, starting with the less pricey stuff.

Speaker 2:

that's very, very good All right Now also and the other thing I'll say John, wait I know we're going to move on. There are club 33 lounges in Walt Disney World. Have you been to any of those?

Speaker 1:

No, of course not.

Speaker 2:

So I think your chance is higher there. So you just have to go in with a member. They're not as grand. You know you have to dress up for club 33, collared shirt, nice shoes, all these kinds of things. But I'm going to put that out in the universe that Johnny's going to be invited to a club 33 lounge. He doesn't have a park ticket either, but the club 33 people get a plethora of perks.

Speaker 1:

So I am just panhandling for you to get some of that All right. Well, you know, as we know, west Coast Disney is disdain for me, so I-.

Speaker 2:

But I'm saying Walt Disney World, there's no nice-. No, I know.

Speaker 1:

I know, so it is possible.

Speaker 2:

And I've only been in two, so-.

Speaker 1:

I don't think it's highly.

Speaker 2:

I don't think it's well you know, but apparently that's going to happen.

Speaker 1:

I think what he said West Coast was minimized by the fact that pretty much Michael Gabriel got in. For gosh sakes, come on.

Speaker 2:

He was dressed as a Phoenician. It was very awkward. He didn't have a shirt, and I'm kidding, I was going to ask.

Speaker 1:

I was going to ask is Michael dressed enough to go? He should be required to Very, very nice.

Speaker 2:

Hello Michael. If you're listening, sir, you need a I'm the Phoenician. Sorry, that's not this park and you need a shirt please.

Speaker 1:

I'm the Phoenician.

Speaker 2:

Actually he wasn't the Phoenician, he was the Egyptian. So now it's really going to be mad at me. He was the Egyptian. He invented with Iris.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, you don't want to there's a whole border war going on there. There was, I believe, Area arrow war or something All right. Also, on the other side of this, you spent time with the sociopath. Yes, the lord Please explain the sociopath and how you ended up spending, because it doesn't sound like a very educated choice, right?

Speaker 2:

No, the lore of the sociopath. So if we go back to the woman lost at sea in Coral Sea, it was very confusing. That led to a recap episode where Riley called him a sociopath, went after it. Brandon then ran the marathon in a shirt that said run, disney, sociopath, in which he almost got arrested for going off course and going to McDonald's.

Speaker 2:

We were in DCA Disney California venture with Elliot Michael and Matthew Desdais were there. They said we're at this little lounge right by where you are. Come say hi. I come to say hi. Oh my gosh, the sociopath is there. So I again it's my better judgment I stayed, do you? There's so many layers to this. We were in the trailer with Riley and he said something about doing laundry and I was like you don't have a job. And you you said like listen man, I watched you with Weston. He does all the work with the kid, like he's always putting the kid to bed. So in that same vein, I see Matthew and Michael and I go over there and talk to them and I just my child is there and I look back like five minutes later and Brandon's like playing peek-a-boo with my kid for like a significant amount of time. So maybe that's all his act. It's part of the sociopath personality, but he was wonderful and sweet and kind to Elliot.

Speaker 1:

Well, that's very, very good. But again, you know they're the sociopath is not going to come in an ugly package, it's going to be a pretty package before they let loose with all their sociopathic tendencies.

Speaker 2:

I have one more thing to tell you that's really not going to make you convince that he's not a sociopath. His fiance fell her first day there and had to go in an ambulance and be checked out. So she's fine.

Speaker 1:

She fell. Are we air quoting she fell?

Speaker 2:

More Brandon.

Speaker 1:

Oh, this is getting, this is getting more colorful. All right, well, we'll. We'll touch on this and further, further episodes, because I was, I was concerned for you and then I saw, maybe, like the thought, the sociopath had broken into club 33 and was wrestling with the Egyptian and I want to.

Speaker 2:

I got to. No shirtless Egyptians. Yes, Club 33 sociopath Not yet. Let's talk about you before we get to Kerry's episode. Yeah, Any run training. You know how's your winter, what's up? Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I have.

Speaker 1:

Let's just say my training has fallen off and I should say to people out there, you know, and I and I have committed to running a 10 K during the season and the the plan was to do that for princess, but, as both of you and I know that for any number of reasons, that was probably not going to be possible.

Speaker 1:

It will not be possible for and there are a lot of reasons because I have other commitments and you know, to pull one of us off stage to put us in a race, I mean, they're usually nice enough to do that. But so now we're, now we're staring at spring, so I have a little more time and I have been kind of minor league, um myling and a half on the on the treadmill just to just to keep, you know, some sort of cardio going. But but it's time to ramp that up, frankly, as I work for for spring. So I don't want to disappoint anybody. I was, I was going to plan on, uh, princess, but it's not going to happen and basically this is just a way to me to say no, I've been really, really lazy and there have been a lot of air fryer wings and a lot of naked wines and very, very, very few.

Speaker 2:

Well, I was going to say like we're still proud of you no matter what, but now no like get it together. Johnny, You're going to. It's going to be hotter now. You're going to sweat more Um you got to do it, so get it together.

Speaker 1:

Well, it rained on the 5k when I ran and the temperature wasn't bad. Got a little bit of rain but the temperature stayed good. So, you know, fingers crossed. I understand, I understand all of this and and what I'm, what I'm staring down the barrel of, but uh, you know, I, I made, I made a promise to Chris Nickitch and I'm going to, I'm going to follow, I'm going to follow.

Speaker 2:

I'm going to get him back on the phone, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, let me again.

Speaker 2:

All right. Well, that's great chat. If you guys have any suggestions for any questions, let us know. And before we dive into Carrie, we do want to shout out our amazing spots are right.

Speaker 1:

That's right, sarah Acres with runs on magic. If you want to experience some extra special magic during those run Disney weekends or you're looking to get away on a cruise, why wouldn't you be? Sarah Acres with runs on magic can help. More important, she can guide you.

Speaker 2:

That's right. She's going to play in the experience that you want Complimentary travel planning services, personalized itineraries. She specializes in run Disney universal cruise vacations. She just went coast to coast. She had a great time out in Disneyland and if that's something you want to plan for September, let her plan that for you. Instagram at runs on magic, where she'll have all kinds of special offers and more. Runs on magiccom, or runs on magic travel at gmailcom.

Speaker 3:

Okay, civilians, it's time for the goods. Let's get on to the interview.

Speaker 1:

Hello, carrie, thank you so much for joining us. It's so great to have you here. We'll start this the way we start every one of our three to one go podcast interviews. How? Are you and let everybody know where are you.

Speaker 3:

I am doing great. I am actually in Minnesota, don't you know? We have no snow. I am back home, where I grew up, and, yeah, I went out east for a little bit, where I went to Villanova, but I've been in Minnesota the majority of my whole life.

Speaker 2:

You know I got an alert on my iPad yesterday that said we may be like getting to the last few white Christmases. So I know I don't want that for you guys.

Speaker 3:

I know, I know.

Speaker 2:

We're good over here, Never gonna have a white Christmas. Down here in Florida we did have a white Disney marathon not white, but it did snow on us.

Speaker 1:

I was in college. When I was in college at the University of Florida, it did actually snow in Gainesville like three days before Christmas. So it was the closest I've had since I moved in 1985.

Speaker 2:

So anyway, we're not here to talk about white Christmas is, although once you start me on Christmas, john, you know like really it's hard to get it. It's hard to get back, but we mentioned in the beginning, you are such a highly decorated athlete at every level of competition, high school and beyond, beyond to where most people dream of going. You achieved all of that. So how did your running journey begin?

Speaker 3:

Well, let me take you way back then to 1989. Actually, I had run a couple races. You know it wasn't as popular to run when you were young, like really young. I ran one when I was five but the cop picked me up and brought me to the finish line, you know, like I didn't run the whole 5k. I ran another one when I was 10. And then when I was 12 and in 1989, I was able to run on the team with my sister.

Speaker 3:

I was in a really small town. I grew up in rural Minnesota, a town of 1600 people, and so for us to have a full team they needed everyone 7th through 12th grade. So I was able to run with her and you know it took a while but I was end up being ninth in the state as a seventh grader and then I won as an eighth grader and I didn't really know what I was doing. But I think you know my family and my friends and everyone did so. It started early for me, chris, and it has had big bangs and I have big teeth and big feet and it was it was an ugly duckling out there but I got it done and I got it done fast and you know, I I wasn't hooked right away, but I loved it. I loved being on a team with my one of my sisters. I loved being on this, this team, that everyone was so excited and I got to run with the guys and so it was wonderful. It's a wonderful start.

Speaker 2:

So I have two quick questions from that. One is a real question, one is not a real question. So I have small feet. Is that my problem? No that is that. It was, that was. So that's not just slow because I have size.

Speaker 3:

No, no, no, you're not slow.

Speaker 2:

All right. Second question was were your parents runners and you saw them run, or you were just drawn to to running?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know, the cool thing is that my dad was a college football player and then he picked up running so he could drop some weight and you know he just wanted to stay fit. He was a really kind of active guy. My mom never had the opportunity to be in sports, even though she was married. She was a high school sweetheart to the, to my dad, like they went through life. She was the one taking stats in the stands, like she is still crazy into sports but never had the opportunity. So for her to raise three girls, all of us heavily involved in athletics, it was pretty cool to be able to, to hear her excitement about sport and encourage us to do it, even though she didn't get to do it and I think even more so because she didn't get to do it. But my dad was right there with us on the, on the court, on, you know, on the golf course, when we were running and you know he was right there with us cheering us on and trying to keep up with us every step of the way.

Speaker 1:

All right, you kind of touched on this because we talked about the. You're in Minnesota, Minnesota born and bred, I think. What five times state champion in high school, which I think.

Speaker 3:

Oh well, well, well, well, back it up, back it up A five time cross country, Cross country.

Speaker 1:

Yep Cross.

Speaker 3:

Eight time in track and you know what I love it. I love that stat because nobody else has done it in Minnesota, and it's really one of the only things I can brag about now is I'm getting older in life.

Speaker 1:

That? Yeah, that's what I was going to ask, Because sometimes things are an update 13 times total Is that still a team.

Speaker 2:

Yeah yeah. Weston kind of walked in the room. He's only a three time bid 13. I know they're going to take a poster down out of your school.

Speaker 1:

And additionally, additionally, the five time cross country. That's also a record. If, if, if what I read is correct, yeah, so all of that. And then you decide time for college. So you head east to Villanova beautiful Villanova University, by the way, one of the prettiest campuses you'll ever see anywhere. What got you to Villanova? Why did you end up going there with so many? I mean, there are great big 10 track programs around it, you know, in Minnesota and beyond. Why did you end up at Villanova?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean, I wanted to stay close to home. But then I started looking at, you know, madison, wisconsin, and it was still quite a ways from Dawson where I grew up. And then I started looking at Michigan, which ended up being my second choice, and that too was either a flight or a whole day's drive away. And so when I was recruited by Villanova, who ended up being I mean, at that time they were the school to go to. They had won six team championships in cross country. They had eight of the 10 NCAA individual titles at cross country.

Speaker 3:

You know, it was like, if you can go to Villanova, that is the spot to go. And, ironically, everywhere that I told that I wasn't going to go, they were so excited that I picked Villanova because it was the school. So I think that because I wasn't going to be here in Minnesota, which I loved, gary Wilson and the team here it was going to be hard for me to get home regardless. So that, right then, and there I was like if I'm not going to go to Minnesota, then I'm going to go to the very best, and that was Villanova.

Speaker 1:

That's so great. Raising the bar for yourself. That's such a terrific mindset. You mentioned you had success really kind of early in your running career seventh grade, when you got to college. How early did you have your success at the division one level?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know it's hard to say I feel like for all the listeners, I am not one to brag about myself, but we are talking about myself, that's why you're here.

Speaker 2:

This is the best. So look, we're not fast runners, we feed on this. It's fascinating to us. I am not fast anymore. You can win things.

Speaker 3:

Yes, it was really fun. I absolutely loved my career and I was fast and I was blessed to be able to do some of the things I did. And in college, the first year, I didn't win a lot but I still was seventh. At the NCAA championships I was a third freshman and I was third on my team, so I had a really good team. Jen Rines ended up winning that year. So you know, even though I didn't win, I still placed high.

Speaker 3:

But it was different for me. I didn't lose one race in the state of Minnesota from eighth grade until my very last race as a senior in high school, and that's because I dropped down to the 800 in event. I did not run very much. So for four years straight I never lost. So, going to Villanova and having bodies all around me and people breathing on me and things like that that I wasn't used to.

Speaker 3:

It was hard. And then to go, you know, and not be the number one person on your team was hard too. But I was really lucky because I had such a great team and I had individuals that were making me believe in something I never really knew, like Jen was thinking about the Olympic games and I'm like, if I can run with her and practice or be kind of closer in races, maybe I can do that. So I traveled 26 hours away from home to get the most out of myself academically and athletically and it really was a dream come true. So you know it was. It was awesome. It ended up working really well for me, but there were a lot of ups and downs and I'm sure we'll get into that. But lots of injuries, lots of laps where people lap me in races. Lots of, lots of ups and downs.

Speaker 2:

I think that's interesting what you bring up, because I'm such a track nerd Again, not being a great track athlete, I did track. It was real cute, you know. But when you talk about going to college and the races, when I'm watching these races on TV, we'll get into this I'm just saying asking all these questions to us and like, well, what do you do here? And he's boxed in and he's this and he's that it becomes not who's the fastest. Sometimes it's so tactical and sometimes it is a little bit of luck as well. So we will, we'll get into that, but let's stay in college. So 97 was a good year for you, right at the cross country national championships. Can you talk a little bit about that race and if and the mindset of it, because I know, you know, mindset plays a lot into it. Was that a race you thought you could win?

Speaker 3:

Yes, I thought I could win it. I think that was maybe one of my and I don't want to say I was confident. I was willing myself to win that race, so much because after my sophomore year of college I found a tumor in my heel and it was. It was really, really scary. They didn't know it was, if it was cancerous, they didn't know if it was career ending. And they allowed me to race that cross country season because I was going to have surgery in February after and they said, if your heel holds up, you can continue to run. So I was kind of like running on this could be my last season. So even though I say I was confident but I don't think it was the confidence that helped me win that race it was the desire and the will to potentially run my very last race the way I was.

Speaker 3:

We didn't know if I'd come back from the surgery. They had to fill it with donor bone. It was a huge surgery. I ended up not having cancer, thank goodness, but it was a six month rehab and recovery and it was. It was crazy. So that's what I was running on that year. I had placed fifth the year before in the NCAA cross country championships and then I came back and won that year and, yeah, I think it was really bittersweet and everybody was just in tears because it wasn't about breaking the tape. It was about really just following through, seeing what you were made of and going for it when it it could have been my last.

Speaker 2:

When was that moment in that race? Cause I didn't, I didn't go back and watch it on YouTube. Maybe it's there where you knew. Cause when you're running a good race, you kind of have a moment where you're like, when it's a longer distance race, we're like I'm going to get my goal, I'm going to be there. Like when did you know?

Speaker 3:

like I'm going to win.

Speaker 3:

Well, amy Skiaras was in the lead and she had placed second as a freshman and she's my age Second as a freshman in cross country.

Speaker 3:

Then she won her sophomore year and then she was coming back as a junior and so she was the one we were all trying to beat and I was hunting her down in the race and I remember, with about a thousand to go, I went by her and I could not get over it. I still like, if you watch the race, chris, I'm looking back and looking back which you know technically you're not really supposed to do because you could fall, whatever and I just couldn't believe it. So I don't even know, until I got to like maybe a hundred meters to go, where I raised my hand and I celebrated. I don't think I ever knew I had it. I was just surprised and just like kind of in awe that I was running the way I was and it really maybe was. I was maybe running above my, my talent on that day, just because I had given it so much thought and I was so excited to hopefully, you know, get the best out of me on that day.

Speaker 2:

Were you a collapser at the end no. I mean, like nothing else on earth when you watch cross country. It's just like for me, someone that like can't fathom that amount of pain, yeah, I'm just like, oh my gosh.

Speaker 3:

no, you were good. You know I I collapse, probably in people's arms, like just by excitement. I remember saying I seize the day like it's like something like that. But no, because I always wanted to get to the cameras, I wanted to be able to talk and go and see everybody. So sometimes I wonder if I really got the most out of myself, because I never once collapsed like that, ever. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I don't, yeah, and I don't know if that's a. I mean, my nine minute pace really doesn't take me out. John, I'm pretty much, you know, I'm ready for all interviews.

Speaker 3:

Maybe it's just when you're like casting career. Maybe it's just when you're like casting career, Like you're an ideal like, yeah, it was starting early.

Speaker 2:

You were like, well, it's okay, and this was before. Like Instagram was the thing I know you weren't worried about like your followers, you were just I love that. Yeah, all right. So you had the surgery. You came back next year. What happened that year and how was that come back?

Speaker 3:

So I didn't run, you know, as I was the year before I ran, I was 15th at the NCAAs, which is actually, you know, better than I kind of thought I would. But we won as a team. So it was pretty spectacular to be able to get back healthy enough maybe not quite like myself, but healthy enough to lead the team to an NCAA championship. So that was pretty awesome. And you know it was a tough road getting back and it was scary and you know we had to do MRIs every six weeks to make sure everything was going. It was a long journey but it really made me grow as a person and as an athlete and I wouldn't change it.

Speaker 3:

It. Just it was hard to be that far away from home dealing with kind of a, an injury. That's still pretty rare to this day. You know donor bone was was kind of new then. Well, it's still pretty new now. You don't hear of it very often. So dealing with that as a 20, 21 year old was heavy and hard and I guess I'm proud of that moment, like proud to come back, run for my team and we got it done.

Speaker 1:

That you had such a huge deal you had such a full portion of a collegiate athletic career the individual championship, the team championship in a in a separate year and then also individual events thought the 3000 indoor and outdoor in 99, the 5000 outdoor. I was going to ask your your memory of those events. But just encapsulating your entire collegiate career and thinking about it honestly, carrie, what more could you have done? Is there any? Did you leave anything? You said you didn't collapse, but at the end of your career you had every right to because you really, you really did everything any athlete could set out to do.

Speaker 3:

It was fun, I mean I came back and I think again I wanted to prove everyone wrong that I was going to be back and be just as good, if not better, than I was before the surgery, and so I did have sort of a driving force. That maybe was a little bit different head. My college years just gone, you know, smooth or just little injuries along the way, that was a pretty big life changing injury and it really made me appreciate the sport and the talent that I was given. So, yeah, I think I had a little extra fire to come back and in my my fifth year I ended up getting like third and second. I had a couple podium finishes and that to me is crazy.

Speaker 3:

Now to look back at how I ended my career and knowing I was disappointed, I mean I had won four more NCAA championships after my surgery. So I was a five time individual champion and we won as a team and I left Villanova kind of like oh, I didn't quite, you know, have the icing on the cake and you know, my all, everything went down, my contracts went down, every I lost all kinds of money because I didn't win. I was still there but I didn't win, and so there's all these things that you know kind of had a little bit of a slap in the face there, but I loved every moment of being at Villanova and it's just funny to look back and say how could I be disappointed? It was still really good, it just wasn't you know.

Speaker 1:

Number one Well, and I mean it's just such a great metaphor for life. I mean you were, you had all the success, and people see that from the outside, they read your bio and they think, oh my goodness, look at this, this is just you know, your LeBron James just skating through it. But in truth, in life it's up, down, up down and you really you went through all of that and then to succeed as well as you have. I mean, it really is. It really is a testament to your fire as a competitor and your resilience.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think it's funny and I can say it now because it's been so long, but my first contract was $12,000. You know, no NIL deals, there were none of that. You know we couldn't even it's. I mean, that could be a whole different podcast because I just saw like Utah, I think, is giving everyone to all the athletes say, you get to pick between two vehicles, no, like to a truck at an SUV or something like that. And you know, when we were younger we couldn't get paid even to babysit, Like you had to sort of hide your $20 cash for babysitting for four hours. You know, so it was.

Speaker 3:

It was all different, but I loved, like I said, every minute of being a collegiate athlete. Like we had to work hard for everything and not that they don't know, I'm not saying that at all, they have like jobs now with these NIL deals and posting and doing all these things. But it was really an honor to be able to run for my school. I was so blessed and I look at my my Villanova Jersey hanging on my wall here and it just was a family that I'll never forget and I love going out there. I love like my heart rate goes up. I get a little sweaty when I start walking on campus. And yeah, the ups and downs, all of it, so worth it.

Speaker 2:

Did you freeze? Oh, I thought you froze. I'm so concerned about my internet connection and we're so fascinated.

Speaker 1:

And that's happened, and that has happened on a new, on a new university occasion. So I can be very still, but if I'm, you know, if it's more than a couple of seconds, I'm probably frozen.

Speaker 2:

All right. So you left college and you decided to keep running. How did you make that decision? Because I know that's a hard decision for a lot of people.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, as I mentioned, you know, we were offered a couple of different contracts. I say we like my. I was offered the contract but my coaches were involved with it. I had hired an agent and so different shoe companies came at us and asked if we were I would be interested in running for them and they kind of gave me a whole package right. It's not just how much they'll pay you but what they can offer in medical or what they could offer in travel stipends, gear stipends, all that stuff. So that's how it worked and I loved running for Adidas. The three stripes was amazing. They were such a good company, great company, to run for. They still support me in any way I can, they can. So yeah, that's how it all worked.

Speaker 3:

I became professional athlete right at the Olympic trials, actually in 2000. And I laugh about it because I got lapped there by Regina Jacobs while she was on NBC winning the race. I still had another lap to go. So see everybody, I got last place. I have been embarrassed at races before and it is not fun, I feel you. But I came back hungry for more and I spent, I guess, 14 years as a pro with Adidas, that entire time.

Speaker 2:

Which is impressive to stay with one shoe company as well and that they support you in that relationship I know from Weston's time at ASICS is so important for everybody. I want to, before we jump into the Olympics. I want to ask about, like the Olympics, the Olympic dreams. You said running with Amy. You were like maybe I can do this. Had you thought about running the Olympics when you were in high school and you were winning all these championships, or was it not until then?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think I thought about it. I wanted to go and run, but I was more thinking I would be Florence Griffiths' joiner, you know, like Flo Joe was someone that I was more into. Or Jackie Joyner Curse, you know, someone that there was no way I was going to be a sprinter, oh my goodness. But I thought of them, as you know. Maybe I could be like that. And then when I got to be about a junior or a senior, I started realizing that some of these women like me that run the mile and the two mile or, you know, maybe a 5K, they are running now in the Olympic games and they're doing things with the swoosh on them or with the Adidas stripes on them. So it was new.

Speaker 3:

When I started college I didn't quite understand it, but then, once I got there, I started seeing more of the professionals coming back, like Sonia Sullivan, for instance. She's a silver medalist for Ireland and she came back to school and she would run with us here and there and she was a sponsored athlete. So I think the more that I went through college, the more I thought I could be a sponsored athlete, maybe, and definitely represent my country at the Olympic games. You know, like the ladies that have gone before me at Villanova.

Speaker 2:

Well, you did that in 2004. You won the 1500 at the trials. You earned a spot on the US Olympic team in the Athens games, which were just an epic games to go to. Can you put that experience from earning your spot to competing in Athens into words?

Speaker 3:

So I finished sixth in the 5000 meters, which is the event that we all thought I would be at at the Olympics. I mean, even I can remember people saying have your well as my agent. He'd say have your mom and dad get their tickets. Like we should be going to Athens on these dates and have your sisters come and Charlie needs to get his tickets out of the stuff. I'm like, no, what, what if I don't make the team? Like you know, you hate to think like that.

Speaker 3:

As an athlete You're supposed to think positively and never let the negative thoughts come into your mind. But I mean, we had a really good 5k team and we had a really good 5k field. So I was just like a little hesitant, right, and that's exactly what I was. In the 5k trials I was a little little hesitant with 1000 to go and three women went by me and I got sixth. I didn't make the top three, which is what you need to do in order to make the team. I had the standard and everything like that, but I just didn't have it mentally to stay in it.

Speaker 3:

So I came back and won the 1500 in a surprise and I will tell you one thing that was like the biggest relief of my life. You know, when I crossed that finish line and won the 1500, I think everybody just was like thank the Lord she's going, because we all thought I'd be there in the 5k, and thank goodness because in 2008 I developed pneumonia three weeks before the trials, couldn't run for two weeks and was a mess. So you know, you just got to go for it. In those moments in life you got to go for it. It wasn't maybe my best event, but I made it and forever I'm an Olympian. So yeah, again one of those moments where I really had to dig deep and learn about myself a little bit and really proud of that moment.

Speaker 2:

I mean I don't think you know, I don't know if you know how many parallels you have to Jeff Galloway in that story there, because he went in the 10k, which was not his best event. He should have gone in the marathon but he was going to give a spot away and yada, yada, yada. And then the next Olympics he got sick before the Olympic trials in 76. A very similar thing and just couldn't you know, wasn't who he needed to be to go in. That, so disappointing. But I mean, the 1500 is such a race. It's one of the most exciting races I think you know in track and field because it's not wide open but like you can have a race but you've got to have a race and things have got to go. You know your way and that did that for you. So what was your Olympic experience like in Greece?

Speaker 3:

Greece was amazing. I mean, you spoke about LeBron James already. He was behind me at the opening ceremonies because one piece of advice my dad gave me. He gave me a lot of advice, but one thing he said find all the TV cameras, because that means you'll be on NBC and stand in front of the NBA guys, because they will get on TV. So we were the middle distance runners. We were, you know, some of us are a little bit taller, so we got to go right in front of them and, sure enough, we were on TV the whole time because they were trying to get like Alan Iverson and LeBron James and a bunch of other guys.

Speaker 3:

But that was one of my favorite moments was kind of looking backwards. They gave us these little. It wasn't a phone, it was a camera. And they gave us a camera and I was you could wear it around your neck when you went out in the opening ceremonies and I did like a panoramic view of the stadium. But when I got to, behind me that was LeBron and I got his chest cause he's so tall.

Speaker 3:

So then I scrolled up right To like see, or panned up to see his face and I was bawling like it was so moving to go out in the opening ceremonies. I mean, it was deafening, it was blinding. There was so many you know flashes of light and I was tears are streaming down my face. But then I got him on camera. He was bawling as well and I was like this guy just signed for probably, like you know, $30 million or whatever he could buy anything in life, and yet he was so honored to be there, just like this little middle distance runner from you know, rural Minnesota. And that was one of the moments where I was like wow, not I made it, but I'm here and here with the best in the world, and it was really cool.

Speaker 2:

I think that's so good that you took it in, because I know some people come in, they're so focused on the competition and I know that the ceremonies, there's a lot of standing and it takes a lot of time and so you've got to weigh those pros and cons with your schedule. I want to ask I don't know if this is a tough question, but you mentioned at Villanova, when you left, there was a disappointment Going to the Olympics and not running the event you felt you were best at. Did that taint it? Did it make it a little difficult at all? Or, like, when you look back, how do you view that?

Speaker 3:

You know, I don't think it tainted it at all. I love the 1500. I mean, if I could have been a little bit quicker at it I would have probably chosen that event. You know what tainted it for me and I even hate to bring it up because it's just such a icky topic but there were four women the next year that ended up getting busted, that ran in the final, and I was the second person out of my heat that didn't make the final. So that's the only little bitter taste that I have is knowing that. But I knew that.

Speaker 3:

You know, we know that when you're running at the level we are, that there could be Hopefully not, but there could be people that are doing it the wrong way. I have been a 100% drug free athlete, alcohol free athlete actually, and so you know it. Just I don't understand that. I don't understand, and I'm not from a country or I'm not from a background where I have to do everything in my power to make ends meet. So I get that there's other reasons why people do things like that, but to me that that's the only sour taste I have, not the distance, not the event I was in, just knowing that maybe people were doing it the wrong way. That made the final in my event, but it was so cool. Like my favorite part was standing on the on the start line seeing the Jumbotron if they even call it anymore the big screen, and I don't know what else we call it no, I don't know if that's still, is that the name?

Speaker 3:

they call it the Jumbotron.

Speaker 1:

We're going to call it that it works.

Speaker 3:

The big, the big screen, but I remember it it makes a picture. Yes, okay, okay, I'm painting the picture. That's what I'm doing, not aging myself, um. But seeing my face in my Jersey with USA on that Jumbotron at the frickin Olympic games, I was like this is so cool. And I remember thinking my mom, my dad, my two sisters, their husbands and my husband's husband is sitting in the crowd right now we all were there, we all made it together and, yeah, pretty dang special.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I can't wrap my head around very, very special, you know, as a little kid, we all watch the Olympics and go, oh, wouldn't it be great.

Speaker 1:

And then we have my athletic ability and we continue watching the Olympics and going boy, wouldn't that be great. I can't, can't imagine what that would feel like and I do love Thank you for sharing that about the multi-million dollar athletes, because they say it In interviews what it meant to them. But when you're a fellow competitor and you see it, and it's not somebody who's you know you think is trying to do public relations, it really is such a unique thing and then and then so unique to do it in Greece the home of the modern Olympics.

Speaker 1:

Before we jump into talking about your running today and your podcast and everything, did you have any opportunity to see Greece while you were there? Because one of the few countries that I Well, not few, but one of the countries I haven't been to, but everybody says you must go there.

Speaker 3:

Oh, most definitely, it was beautiful. So we, the track and field team, went over to the island of Crete beforehand that's where we were staged to, you know, get our some of our practice done. And we weren't in the village then, so they had us over there. That was amazing. I mean we were at a five-star resort just training. I mean that's like you'll never. I'll never do that again in my life. And then we, I went over to Athens.

Speaker 3:

I didn't get to see much during the time that I was competing, so that was about two weeks actually that I was in the village, because the first week I didn't compete but I was getting ready for it, and then I competed the second half. So then, once I was done, my husband and my sisters and my mom and dad, we kind of explored Athens together a little bit. Charlie actually is an architect, my husband, so he had spent time over there as a student, so he kind of was the tour guide. And then the following week, my parents and Charlie and I we went to Sifnos, the island of Sifnos, and Spent another week there. So, yes, we, I was in Greece for about a month actually and I had a different tan, like my skin was different from the Sun over in a soda.

Speaker 2:

I know, but even like the.

Speaker 3:

Minnesota Sun, like I still get. You know, you get dark in the summer, but it was weird. I had been over there and I definitely looked different and it was. It was really cool though.

Speaker 2:

So, yes, you need to go to Greece if you can and definitely see all of it the old and I yes, I've run the Athens marathon, so I feel like I got a little. Yeah, john, you're welcome to go run the Athens marathon and Cree went this year.

Speaker 1:

Well, let me tell you something, the last six miles are downhill. If I had to run 26.2 miles.

Speaker 1:

I'd be there longer than a month trying to do that, but I would spend a lot of money, but congratulations, kerry, for actually taking the opportunity to do that, because I've all I've spoken to Olympic athletes and they've had to go back years later To see places because they're like I was so focused and you know, really does. Oh yeah, when your event, where, what your event is and when it takes place. But good for you. I salute you. Everyone needs to travel. If you're listening to this and you don't have a passport, get one immediately or you will not be our favorite listener.

Speaker 3:

And and be a distance to get one immediately.

Speaker 3:

It takes a long time to get one, so hurry, yes, but also be a distance runner, because that's the best way to sightsee, it's so fun, and now we have easier ways to take pictures. I used to take my cannon with me and, like you know, I am dating myself, but you ran with your camera. So when I would travel overseas and race all summer long, I mean I'd be all over Europe and so, or Asia, wherever, and I would take my I had a gray one. Us three girls all got three cannons one year, different colors, and I had a gray one and I took it with me.

Speaker 1:

That's so great, that is in.

Speaker 2:

Kenya when I took I was with my I took a picture of one of the groups going by us. Then we went to the camp later that day and I was like, oh look, I took a picture of you guys running and they were like you run with your phone. I mean, yes, I can't imagine if you were like in Kenya with a camera. They'd be like yeah, wait a minute. You run with a camera, can you? That's slowing you down so well.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I'm sure it did.

Speaker 1:

Wow, all right, let's all right your career again. We there are so many other things we would talk about, but we don't want to keep you here all day. We all have to go pray for a way. Christmas in Minnesota. Yes, what do you? What are you running? What you're running like today, what, what do you do as a runner today? Do you consistently run, or yeah, or what?

Speaker 3:

I would have to say that's the the right way to put it. I consistently run, you know, maybe five, six days a week when I'm healthy. I got a little bit of an arch thing going on, which is the first time in probably seven years that I've had an Injury that's kept me from running. You know, I've been pretty healthy but I'm not running very much. I run 20, 30 miles a week. There have been three marathons that I have trained for, but my training is in quotes there because I still only run maybe 35 to 55 miles a week. I know that sounds like a lot for some, but you know I'm coming from a hundred mile weeks at times. So it's, you know, not much. I run about a third or even a quarter of what I used to run, but I run hard. That's the one thing. If I only run 20 miles, 30 miles a week, most of my three to five mile runs are still pretty fast. I don't do a lot of interval necessarily training, but I do run kind of significant pace, I'd say.

Speaker 2:

What does that mean? Can you, just because I just wanted?

Speaker 3:

so when I'm not banged up. I'm just gonna say where my listeners are like 640 to seven minute pace, you know, and when I'm training I do this thing called the long run challenge.

Speaker 1:

And so if any of the sners wants yes, I love it.

Speaker 3:

I need to do it again. But you can start at whatever distance you want to start, but typically you add something each week. So for me I started at 10 10 miles, because this is when I was coming out back from pregnancy. I started when my little guys were 10 weeks I didn't do it with Ruby, my oldest, but my boys 10 weeks and I would run 10 miles and then I would add a mile each week till I got to 20 and I'm telling you I got really fit off of that. At the longer I went, the faster I went. So I Need to do it again. I might need to start at like six miles this time and go to 16 or something like that. But I've had friends that started at three miles and had added a half mile. But it's just kind of fun to add a little bit each week.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'll do that with you. I need a little. We always talk about this. I need it's. You know we'll get to this, but your schedule, my schedule, is hard to be like. I want to run this nerve. I want to train for this race, because that's another weekend away from your family, that's you know something. But I want to. So the challenge like that might be good, because it's really hard to convince yourself to go for like a long run when you don't have I know let's do it because I need to get going once I get this foot back.

Speaker 3:

You and I are on it.

Speaker 2:

All right on our. Now, my, your time will be. You know, times will not be we don't need it compare times.

Speaker 1:

Nope, oh, oh good, because I've run a 640 440 so there you go oh 440 pace. Yeah, quarter-mile, or uncourt, no quarter-mile, or I ran six minutes 40 seconds the quarter mile. You know it was a run walk thing. So people leave me alone, leave me alone.

Speaker 3:

And I, like I said, I'm getting coming over, I'm getting slower by the second peep, so, like, don't be mad at me, my pace is not. It's not as it was mad at you.

Speaker 2:

We're impressed, and that's me. It's my nerdy thing, like when Weston comes back and I go fast, I know isn't it cool though?

Speaker 3:

It's so fun when people can like I mean, I get it. It's sometimes it's overwhelming, but it is really fun to hear how fast people are actually going and how they see J Albertson like his pace and his two back-to-back Weston's like like 459 or, like I know, 459 for a marathon, john.

Speaker 1:

You know me, I didn't know anything about this. I did. I ran track in high school but I ran the quarter-mile and I you know the six lap relay and I was a high jumper so I didn't know this distance running. We had to do two miles before practice. I hated every minute of it, so I didn't know anything about this. And when I started hearing these guys who were the last two to three miles of their of their marathon were like 45 seconds or a minute better times than some of their middle mileage how they could do that, it's just it. The whole thing, just it makes no sense to me. For Kerry, for years I thought the person who run the marathon was just down around the corner waiting until it was like an acceptable time and Would sprint the last 600 yards.

Speaker 1:

I was convinced of it because there's no way you're going that fast at that point it is. It is remarkable what the human body can do and where we've gotten with, yeah, distance running, and it's such a great measurable that you can measure up against different areas because you know equipment. Sure, it does get a little better, training methods, nutrition We've learned more, but it's still just. You know the desire to go quicker and the desire to push yourself. Okay, um, speaking of pushing yourself, I believe you were. You were a broadcast journalism major at.

Speaker 1:

Villanova lovely Villanova University you mentioned, see Tali run your podcast. What was the thought behind that? Why did you start it and what were your goal? What were and are your goals for that?

Speaker 3:

so we started in about 2010 as a YouTube channel and they were gonna follow me on my journey back to the sport originally. And then I was like I don't know if I'm gonna get back like I was. We tried, we, we did some updates up until the 2012 Olympic Games or Olympic trial. Excuse me, but it wasn't in my heart and that was okay too. That was okay to share with everybody. So it started out as a YouTube channel where we did, you know, some cooking videos and exercise videos and race updates and all these fun things interviews. And then in 2016, my editor and director said hey, I think you should do a podcast. Lots of people are doing podcasts now and Nobody in the running world or not that many in the running world are doing one. So we started the podcast, which was a little bit easier on my editor and my director, who were both starting families like me, like it was just getting a little bit busier in life. So we started that and, yeah, I don't think we've missed a week since 2016.

Speaker 2:

That's very, very impressive, because we've only been in 25 episodes and my editor, my husband, has all the hard work.

Speaker 2:

On him, but it is a lot of work, but I'm sure you love doing it as well, just because you love to talk to one, hear stories and I think running is the most inspiring thing in the world when we get to share. You know the stories. We always gain something from what someone has to say. But you did go to school for broadcasting and you have sort of blossomed into I mean, I'm gonna call one of the premier female US distance, middle distance, you know broadcasters on ESPN, on NBC. Was that always your goal and have you achieved what you you know? How do you feel about everything that you've achieved?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think you know I've really loved what I've been able to do with my sport while not having to run fast. Yeah, I remember right the my first year as a pro. I went to USA cross-country championships and I finished second in between Regina Jacobs and Suzy Favour. Hamilton and Regina Jacobs told all the media like yeah, you can interview me, but the story is Carrie and that she's this first time you know pro athlete and she sandwiched between two of the greats that we've ever seen in US middle distance running. So that was. You know. That was kind of cool.

Speaker 3:

Where then this? The TV cameras came to me and it was Tony Revis, who anyone in the sport knows that name, he's a long time voice of the sport. He's a walking encyclopedia, I say, of track and field and road racing. And I said, tony, I want your job someday or I want to be with you in the booth. There's not a lot of ladies in there and I I want to be on camera. And he immediately Called up rock and roll marathon and they started having me come and doing do some of the events and also Some of the voiceover work when I could, like they supported my running career.

Speaker 3:

But they said, when you can and when we need help, we'd love to have you. So I just had like a little sprinkling of it here and there in the early stages of my my running career and then I slowly started picking up bigger gigs and then, once I sort of retired, then I went full-on in and yeah, I mean I did. I did study that communications with the nephysis and broadcast. I wanted to be on camera but I didn't know. I didn't know where and when and it just kind of naturally fit With the running schedule and then you know when I could I would do the broadcast. So do you have any?

Speaker 2:

memorable or favorite broadcast moments that you've been able to do.

Speaker 3:

Oh, I mean, the Olympic trials have been super fun. I did the one in LA. Was that 2016 Seven? I think was ten days, excuse me, ten days after having my baby, my last baby, greer. I had to think about what name it was, because my brain doesn't work. I got a cycle through all of us. It doesn't work. It's like, really, I've never known Greer, okay, and now I have a dog, so now I get in there too.

Speaker 3:

But so Greer was ten days old when I did the broadcast there and that was interesting. I was on the back of a bike and you know. You know what happens ten days post baby year.

Speaker 2:

Well, what I think is most interesting about that story and I've heard you tell it, and that's why I want you to kind of talk about it is as a woman. You said first, there's not a lot of women that do this. You've just had a baby ten days ago. You have an opportunity to do a job. You don't turn it down, I feel like because you're afraid. As a woman, is that you know? Can you talk to that low? Because being a woman in this industry, to have the success you've had is requires, unfortunately, sacrifices like that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know, that was something where we knew before it was going to be tight. But I didn't want to say no, and actually I give it up to NBC, who is really good to me, to say okay, we're gonna hire you. If you're willing to do this, we're gonna hire you. But then they were kind of like I think it was 15, 16 days before my due date, when you gonna have them, when you gonna have them. Well, he was seven days late. So you know they were taking a risk, but we did not plan for him to be late.

Speaker 2:

So no one wants him to be his son.

Speaker 3:

Because Ruby was 10 days early, everett was 10 days late and Greer was seven days late. So I had it all over the place. But you know I've pumped before in porta-potties. I've done all of it. I actually said no to the Olympic Games in 2020 because I was going to have to be there even longer. I know you've had John Anderson on the broadcast. He actually was awesome and stepped in and said I want to do this gig, carrie. So they ended up hiring John for the Olympic broadcast service, which is awesome.

Speaker 3:

But you know, yeah, as a mom and as a dad, there's dads that do all kinds of different sacrificing as well, but when my body isn't quite right, it's tough to go and do that. You know, having a baby is a big deal, and sitting on the back of a motorcycle after having a baby is not so cool. Before sitting on the back of a motorcycle when you are seven months pregnant, like I did at the Chicago Marathon one year, that causes all kinds of contractions that you're not used to. But I would change that. Chris. I think you're probably the same way.

Speaker 3:

You know, and I don't know if I just grew up like kind of like suck it up and deal with it, which isn't always the way that I would recommend people to be, but I'm a tough female athlete in person, and so I want to do the things I want to do, and I don't want anyone to not ask because they're afraid I'd say no. I want to be the person to say no to something, and I rarely do the Olympic Games. I said no because I was going to be there for five weeks and that, to me, was just too long, and I'm hoping to get back there this time. So we'll see.

Speaker 1:

Well, and that's a good work-life balance is very, very important too, and people need to realize that, on whatever level you're on. And be careful getting too good on the back of the bike, on the motorcycle carry, because I always worry then they'll throw you into doing that for the Tour de France. Oh no, whatever they pay, whatever they pay the person who does that, it's not enough, oh scary.

Speaker 1:

They need, oh Tani, like money to do that. I just don't know how anyone in their right mind and it's all I pictured when you said that was just the ridiculousness of all of that.

Speaker 3:

I shouldn't have been on the back of the bike in Chicago and they will all say that, but they ran out of the sidecars at weekend so actually my driver felt my baby kick quite a bit throughout that race. It was funny. And then I brought Greer back the next year and I was like this is the guy that was kicking you from the back. This is really cool.

Speaker 1:

Oh, that's really great. Okay, so you've also done the Olympic trials in Atlanta, I believe, yeah, and so can you talk about that experience and what's different here in Orlando?

Speaker 3:

Well, orlando, I get to work with Carissa, which I'm super excited about. We're going to have some fun. But what I did in Houston and in Atlanta was I was doing not so much what you both do at your events, where you're announcing the names and things. I was doing more like a play-by-play and color of the race, because they couldn't air the NBC coverage on the Jumbotrons, so they basically had like a live TV show in Atlanta. In Houston, I was doing more of a typical announcing of who's coming by and that kind of thing. So I think that Carissa and I will hopefully get to tell more of the stories and do things like that. I haven't quite exactly heard exactly what we're doing, but I think you and I can have some fun and that's what I love about being on TV. I have a little bit more time to tell the story because the cameras are following athletes, so hopefully when we're at the Olympic trials we'll be able to do that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I hope so. I was there in Atlanta. I remember listening to you. I was pregnant there in Atlanta. That was the last thing we did before the world kind of fell apart a little bit, but it was great listening to you there and I'm excited to be able to bring that to Orlando. It's going to be a different course experience than in Atlanta but it's some good hopefully some good community sport here. And ironically I have someone who I won't name, drop them that's coming to train here in Orlando, has sent their altitude tent and all these things have been mailed to my house. How cool that we are helping assisting athletes by holding their items so they can come out here and train and get ready. So we have loved having you here, Carrie. We have sort of a few closing questions that everybody gets their chance to answer. So, John, do you want to go first with our first three, two, one go closing question.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. When you get to a hard place in training, in a race, how do you motivate yourself to keep going? There are so many different strategies people employ. What's your strategy?

Speaker 3:

I think what's worked best for me is positive word cues. So in a marathon I'll break it down every six miles, every 10 K, and have a different word where, when my mind goes to that dark spot, I just immediately go back to my word cues. And I did that on the track. Whether it was a 1500, I would do every lap or the 5 K. I would do every K and then in the marathon now I've done every 10 K. Or like I said something you know, maybe it's every three miles or whatever.

Speaker 3:

You just kind of pick up where you want to add in those words and I would write them down, if I need to, on my hand with a Sharpie. But I use it in training and I use it in marathoning and in racing and I love it. I love knowing that I just have a word. That's all I need to hopefully get me back. And sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, but it's much better than thinking, oh, I'm so tired out here If you can say believe, or you know even, and repeat your kid's names or your husband or your spouse's name, whatever. It is just those positive words that get you out of a negative funk.

Speaker 1:

It's very Eastern philosophy to have a mantra and you give yourself a mantra, so that's not surprising that you use that, but I think you're the first person who's said that. I find that very interesting.

Speaker 2:

Yep, you articulated that very well. Is that something that came from a coach or something that you kind of discovered?

Speaker 3:

I don't know Actually my dad and I did it when I was in high school we would visualize and then we would always have these little words that you know, when times got tough. And then I use that in college and as a pro, and I still do now and even I think like there's times when I'm getting ready for a big event, where I'm performing whether it's a speech or, you know, a big meeting or, you know, even if it's at a broadcast like I just have to remember to calm myself down and think about what I'm doing and ways that I can fight through when I get scared or nervous or whatever it is.

Speaker 2:

I think that's great for those people who are listening who might say, well, I'm not an elite athlete, I'm not this, but the visualization does matter so much in terms of, I guess, kind of almost settling the nerves, because then you can get to that body where you feel like you've been there before. So if you're listening and you're nervous about any race coming up, take the time, you know, don't let it feel like it's all one bow jumbo. It really does help even the best of athletes. All right, our final tough question that we have for you you've been at a lot of races, from rural Minnesota to Athens Olympics. Could you paint a picture of just maybe one of, or the most inspiring moment that you've seen?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think is it my races or some?

Speaker 2:

Whatever that like when you go back and you think of that Goosebumps moment that it. You know what?

Speaker 3:

was that? I mean, I have so many, but I will have to say the first thing that came to mind was Chilane winning the New York City Marathon. I was in the booth right at the finish line with John Anderson, tim Hutchings, and I could not get it together. Like we were announcing her and I'm like, oh my gosh, she's going to win. Like I totally forgot I was on camera and which is fine at times, but then I started to cry and weep because I'm good friends with her and we went to commercial and we were laughing because I was like, get it.

Speaker 3:

I got to get it together, like we knew she was going to win and we were coming back for the final statements, you know, and I remember them getting in my ear saying, okay, carrie, can you do this? And I was like I can do it, but immediately it like we got back on camera and I was a blubbering mess, like that was a really big moment and I think I'll never forget that along when, when Des won the Boston Marathon, I remember having my daughter with me and she was a little and I said, ruby, you need to watch this. This is history right here. This is history. We know it's her, but we won't forget this moment and yeah, I mean I get emotional just thinking about that. You know it's not about the wins so much, but to see your friends who are elite athletes, but to see that hard work pay off and you know that they're carrying a lot of the women that have gone before them and that are coming behind them with them. That was just awesome and I still get chills thinking about it.

Speaker 2:

It's so nice for them. Yeah, just the hard work that it takes into being as good. You know you can be the best, but not have that race where you break through and you don't get to break the tape. So for both of them to get that moment especially having watched their careers and you know how much hard work goes into it it's just, it's amazing to feel that joy for them and the impact they'll leave forever.

Speaker 1:

No, I love those honest moments and I think it's such a great thing to let people know. Is that elite athlete to the person who's walking their first half marathon at a 16 minute pace. Everybody's overcome something to get to where they've gotten and we should celebrate all of that. All right, carrie, you're ubiquitous, but let people know if they want to follow you, your career, what you're going to be doing. Where can they do that?

Speaker 3:

First of all, I am not good at social media, but follow me at Carrie Tollefson or at C Tolle Run. I love posting things, but I'm not real, you know, regular or very good at it, but I am there and I would love your support. If you want to hear a new episode every Thursday, follow C Tolle Run. There's new ones coming out all the time. Yeah, come see Chris and I in Orlando and hopefully we'll do some more gigs together. That'd be great.

Speaker 2:

Well, we would love that. We've loved having you on here. So thank you so much, carrie, and we can't wait to see you on the screen and on the streets here in Orlando. Thank you, it's been an honor.

Speaker 1:

All right athletes.

Speaker 2:

Here's the drill Time to shape up your diet, chris, give them the goods. All right time for a little healthier you chat. We're going to chat about magnesium, John, what do you know about magnesium?

Speaker 1:

I believe it's on the periodic table. Am I right about that? I'm not 100%. I think so, mg. It may very well be. I'll have to look that up. I don't know anything.

Speaker 2:

Well, John, no, no, you can't teach chemistry.

Speaker 1:

Could I ask you a question, though? I'm going to ask you a question just out of nowhere, before you get into magnesium, which I'm sure is very important for your diet and I'm even equally sure that I don't get enough of it, is milk of magnesium, contained magnesium? All right, homogenization and I'm Magnesium.

Speaker 2:

I believe God. I'm gonna be wrong on this. I believe some form okay.

Speaker 1:

All right, I just wondered it. It struck me when I saw we were gonna be talking about it and I've always never had milk of magnesium, not even sure what it does, but it was you big, what you really don't know what it does. I really don't. It was ubiquitous when I was a kid when my mom would watch soap operas and like daytime game shows. It was like the most Advertised thing. That in Geritol, which I do know what that does, but I wasn't sure about what does Geritol do?

Speaker 1:

it gives you healthier blood. It really doesn't.

Speaker 2:

But that's not a thing anymore. That's what. That's what I haven't sold out anymore.

Speaker 1:

Watch the movie quiz show. Martin Scorsese plays the head of Geritol. Anyway, we're getting off track here.

Speaker 2:

We are off track.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So magnesium not milk of magnesium, magnesium in general big deal to our bodies because it actually plays a role in over 300 biochemical React reaction. So it's like this you know it's a production assistant that no one talks about, that does a lot of things. That's a little entertainment lingo for you guys. You might need to supplement it. So I supplement it because it helps with muscle and nerve function. So if you're getting any cramping at night after running, maybe you want to add in some more magnesium. It also kind of helps your heartbeat stay steady. It helps your bones get strong.

Speaker 2:

The reason why I really supplement it is for brain health. We talk a lot about how I'm really focused on my brain health and keeping my brain sort of at its max. So it helps regulate neurotransmitters which are like the messengers of the brain. So if you want to amp up your brain harmony, your brain focus, magnesium is the conductor there to make sure everything is working. Also, it's a traffic cop for calcium. So if we think back to science, what apparently hard to teach the enzymes, the reactors, the sin, you know all the things that after the keys and have to go together for the enzymes to work. Magnesium is kind of a traffic cop for calcium, making sure it enters the nerve cells at the right time, which helps learning, memory and concentration. If the magnesium is not there, there's chaos in your brain traffic, which can be issues with focus and mental clarity, which is one of the reasons why I also like to take magnesium.

Speaker 2:

It's also helps with digestion. So your milk of magnesium question it relaxes the bowels if you will, not to a laxative level if you're supplementing with just magnesium, but it will Make that transition a little easier. So sometimes I recommend a supplement for people who are traveling, because airplanes travel Can mess that up. Yes, but you can also get it from food and things that you should be eating anyway nuts, seeds, whole grains, leafy greens, even dark chocolate. And the last benefit of magnesium is it helps with sleep. Are you a fan of magnesium?

Speaker 1:

now I am a fan of magnesium and I think I probably actually do a pretty decent job getting it, because you know my favorite snack is, well, cheese and crackers, which I, but we do try to deny.

Speaker 2:

Did not list cheese and crackers.

Speaker 1:

I just, I just have to. I have to make sure because I have any, any Cheese. Folk are listening and they're like to send me free cheese. Yes, I love cheese, but I eat a lot of nuts. We do eat a lot of leafy greens in this house. Again, my diet, not my biggest problem exercise would be, but I I'm a fan. I'm a fan of magnesium.

Speaker 2:

At this point, I will make sure You're getting enough and then if you ever want to supplement it, just send me a message, because there's so many different types. So if you just go to Walgreens and you grab the bottle of magnesium, it's probably not going to do everything that you want. So if you're really thinking about brain health, it's magnesium L3 innate, because that's the only one that penetrates the blood Brain barrier. You don't need to remember that, just know you have any questions, send them to me.

Speaker 2:

I partnered with Fullscript, which is an online place where you can buy supplements, because I would kept buying my magnesium from this. I was like, can I just get a discount because I keep buying in here? And they said, yes, so I've got a whole little thing set up. I can send you a plan. I could send you kinds of information. So that's just message me for that. And then this is our healthy or you moment. So we want to help you live your best life, whatever year it is, whatever your body needs whether it's weight loss, energy lowering blood pressure, helping your heart health we can do that at healthier you. It's a 12-week nutrition education class Online with monthly chats with me. Go to galley, course calm and use the code Podcast to save a hundred and fifty dollars. And and we will talk more magnesium because it's it's a friend.

Speaker 1:

All right. All right, sarge, I could sit this one out, carissa, because this is a question directly to you from Instagram which I still barely understand Do you have any tips for managing training with kids and a busy life and I can attest to the fact that you have a kids and be an incredibly busy life because I'm involved with trying to schedule our podcast recordings- yeah, I feel like I have tips.

Speaker 2:

I don't know how well I do that. It's very hard to do Juggling. Everything is very hard. Well, you do a lot.

Speaker 1:

We do an awful lot. I mean really honest, you have a very, very busy schedule and somehow I mean I think I need therapy and I think I need some less anxiety in my life.

Speaker 2:

Those things I'm neglecting, but I do always get in my workouts because for me, I link that to my mental health and to feeling better after I work out and having more energy and sleeping better. So my goal is for workouts a week. I plan them ahead of time. So I look at my week, I figure out when they're going to happen and Western and I work together to really make sure that that does happen. Which is why I literally got off the bike 20 minutes before we did this podcast because I knew that was my window.

Speaker 2:

I hate to say this because it's not my jam, but I think working out in the morning for busy parents is so much easier because we can't control what life throws at us. Like Claire was home sick yesterday. So when you do it in the morning you do get to get that in earlier, but I think it's just schedule it. Look at your weeks. I aim for, like I said, for workouts a week, and the other thing I'll say is that for me as a parent, the weekends are almost impossible to work out because you don't have that structure of the kids going to school or Elliott going to his nanny or daycare. So maybe playing your long runs on a Monday, on a Tuesday or things like that, but work around it and communicate with your spouse, and then I do think it's good.

Speaker 2:

My girlfriend, darcy, and I were talking about this. We were both on the Peloton, ironically, last Saturday, but we knew that was going to happen because the kid we had clear gymnastics, me and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. The kids see that, ok, mom's going to go work out now, staying with dad. Ok, now it's dad's turn. So for the kids to see that, I think that's important because you're taking care of yourself in a positive way. It's not the kids seeing you. You know, guzzle the wine at night because you've had a stressful day. It's you saying well, I'm going to. You know this helps me.

Speaker 1:

By the way, I have seen you guzzle the wine. Everybody know.

Speaker 2:

Those could both help. One is a little bit more of a positive habit to maintain long term. So it's scheduling, it's trying in the morning and it's communicating with a partner, especially those long runs. Those are the ones that you want to make the priority as you're getting into more training. Yeah, johnny, do you have dog? Well?

Speaker 1:

no, I was going to say oh yes, we do. We have dog, two dogs, two cats. I will say that the morning thing I am with you there. I'm not really a morning guy and when I, when I was in the best shape of my life and I was working out a lot, I worked out. I was working the Indiana Jones show and there was a gym there and I had a long break, so it was a mid afternoon thing. Which I really sort of got used to was that was a really good time for me because I knew I'd fueled up properly If I hadn't gotten enough sleep, I was able to kind of get in a good place.

Speaker 1:

But I agree with you on the morning thing and I've done that now with my training because, to your point, this is for whether you have children or not. If you plan to work out in the morning and something happens, you have the rest of the day that you can make it work for yourself If you have to grab something in the afternoon. But if your plan is to work out at nine o'clock at night and that falls apart for whatever reason and let's just stand up to midnight and working out, you don't have the rest of the day. So as much as I completely are on the same page with you about not being a morning workout person. It just, particularly if you have a busy life, it really gives you more options. So I agree with that.

Speaker 1:

Let me ask you this question about maintaining, because I am not, as you know, as well as anyone other than maybe my wife. I am not a really organized sort of person and to do that for me, I really have to write things out, and I mean not on my phone, I have to physically. I am that guy who remembers things. It's an old actors thing. If you're having trouble with a script, write it out by hand. Yeah, for those of you who are listening, which is all of you watching.

Speaker 1:

I'll be, I think, if I'm not at home. Hey, are you available for this? I'm like well and my phone. It looks good, but let me go back to the master schedule. So I think that's really really.

Speaker 2:

I even have, like this week. I mean, no one can see this. I don't know why I'm bothering to hold this back up, but I have on. This week was a really busy week last week and I have two days that I wrote out when I was going to work out, just because I knew like I needed to make sure that I planned it in. I didn't put any calls, I made that time. So for me it's that it's that important and I think for health, like it really is that important, like, and. But the flip side of that is like what show are you binge watching? I don't know. I'm folding laundry and going to bed, so I, you know you pick and choose, but I feel better as a human when I get in the workouts. I smell. I don't shower I haven't showered since my biking, but that's okay. So it's okay to smell. Your kids will still love you and your spouse is maybe not, but your kids Good advice all right.

Speaker 2:

Well, thank you for the question. Please keep sending them to us on Instagram. Less than managers are. 321. Go podcast Instagram. I tend to see Instagram a little more, so if you want to sit in, that might be easier. This is where this person is nameless. But yeah, and you can also email us 321, go podcast at gmail, doc. Thank you to carry. Thank you to you guys for listening. Have a great day.

Club 33 and Walt's Vision
Training for a 10K Run
Early Running Success and College Decision
Early Running Career Success and Challenges
Reflections on Collegiate Running Success
Olympic Dreams and the Athens Games
Olympic Memories and Running Today
From Broadcasting to Motherhood
Magnesium