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Peres Jepchirchir: Olympic Gold Medalist Live from Kenya

March 07, 2024 Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey Season 1 Episode 41
Peres Jepchirchir: Olympic Gold Medalist Live from Kenya
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321 GO!
Peres Jepchirchir: Olympic Gold Medalist Live from Kenya
Mar 07, 2024 Season 1 Episode 41
Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey

Imagine being on the starting line with not just the weight of your own expectations but that of an entire nation known for its marathon legends. That's the world Peres Jepchirchir lives in, and she's not just surviving; she's thriving, with Olympic gold to prove it. In a heart-to-heart, Peres unwraps the layers of her journey—Olympic glory, Kenyan athletic rivalry, and the cultural exchanges that come with being a celebrated athlete. Her insights are a masterclass in resilience and ambition, set against a backdrop of a nation rich in running talent and tradition.

How does a world-class athlete juggle the demands of motherhood with the grueling schedule of marathon training? Peres doesn't just balance these worlds; she excels, drawing strength from her role as a mother to fuel her competitive fire. Our discussion spans from personal stories of parenting to the broader landscape of international marathons, where camaraderie and the sound of one's national anthem can be the sweetest victory. In Healthier U, we tackle the universal struggle of staying motivated beyond the New Year's resolution rush, offering insights on how to keep those goals within reach, just as Peres does with each stride toward the finish line.

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  • 30-day Summer Nutrition Shake Up


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Email us 321GoPodcast@gmail.com

Order Carissa's New Book - Run Walk Eat

Improve sleep, boost recovery and perform at your best with PILLAR’s range of magnesium recovery supplements.
Use code 321GO at www.theFeed.com to get 15% off

Let Sara Akers with RunsOnMagic plan your next runDisney weekend!
IG @runsonmagic or you can go to www.RUNSONMAGIC.com or email her ...

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Imagine being on the starting line with not just the weight of your own expectations but that of an entire nation known for its marathon legends. That's the world Peres Jepchirchir lives in, and she's not just surviving; she's thriving, with Olympic gold to prove it. In a heart-to-heart, Peres unwraps the layers of her journey—Olympic glory, Kenyan athletic rivalry, and the cultural exchanges that come with being a celebrated athlete. Her insights are a masterclass in resilience and ambition, set against a backdrop of a nation rich in running talent and tradition.

How does a world-class athlete juggle the demands of motherhood with the grueling schedule of marathon training? Peres doesn't just balance these worlds; she excels, drawing strength from her role as a mother to fuel her competitive fire. Our discussion spans from personal stories of parenting to the broader landscape of international marathons, where camaraderie and the sound of one's national anthem can be the sweetest victory. In Healthier U, we tackle the universal struggle of staying motivated beyond the New Year's resolution rush, offering insights on how to keep those goals within reach, just as Peres does with each stride toward the finish line.

Send us a Text Message.

Support the Show.

Let Registered Dietitian Carissa Galloway lead you through a science-backed plan to transform the way you think about your diet.
Visit www.GallowayCourse.com and use the code PODCAST at checkout for a great discount!

Become a 321 Go! Supporter. Help us continue to create! HERE

Join Customized + over a $500 discount! HERE you get-

  • 6 Months of Customized Training
  • 6 Months of Healthier U chats
  • 30-day Summer Nutrition Shake Up


Follow us! @321GoPodcast @carissa_gway @pelkman19

Email us 321GoPodcast@gmail.com

Order Carissa's New Book - Run Walk Eat

Improve sleep, boost recovery and perform at your best with PILLAR’s range of magnesium recovery supplements.
Use code 321GO at www.theFeed.com to get 15% off

Let Sara Akers with RunsOnMagic plan your next runDisney weekend!
IG @runsonmagic or you can go to www.RUNSONMAGIC.com or email her ...

Speaker 1:

Welcome to 321 Go the Podcast. I'm John Pelkey.

Speaker 2:

And I'm Karissa Galloway, and we're bringing you stories from start to finish to keep the everyday athlete motivated to keep moving towards the next finish.

Speaker 1:

Alright Karissa. Today we have our very first Olympic gold medalist on 321 Go and it was such a big deal that I was not invited to do the interview.

Speaker 2:

Well, technically, you were invited to Cree's wedding, but she didn't go to Cree's wedding, so, since you weren't in Kenya, you weren't there for the chat. But, yes, I sat down at the home. It was a very like MTV style interview. We're going to sit in your living room with a 2020 Olympic Marathon Champion, paris Jepchir Chir. We had a quick chat about her experience and her life in Kenya. Since then. She was a little nervous about the chat because I think they always worried that she was worried that her English wouldn't be good enough. But it's a great chat.

Speaker 2:

Forgive me if in my asking of questions, you're talking slower. I was trying to just be. We learned in Kenya that the speed at which Americans talk and the hand gestures you get a lot of okay, so I tried to just be quick, succinct. We got some really cool insight though. This woman. In the span of less than a year from 2021 because the 2020 Olympics were 2021 to 2022, she won in succession the Olympic Marathon, the New York City Marathon and then the Boston Marathon, which is a remarkable feat that has never been done before. She's fighting some injuries, so she's hoping to be put on the 2024 Olympic team for Kenya. But, as you know Kenyan endurance distance athletes is very competitive so not sure that she will make the team crazy right to the Olympic Marathon Champion might not make the team.

Speaker 1:

Unbelievable. Yeah, I mean the amount of talent.

Speaker 2:

She just ran a 67 minute half marathon in UAE the same weekend as Princess, but that was only good enough for seventh, and I think three of her countrymen were in front of her. So she's going to run the London Marathon in April. So please send all the good vibes to Paris Mom, wonderful hostess. If you need a place to stay in Kenya, I'm sure she would welcome you into her home In healthier you. We are going to talk about motivation and the motivation to keep going with changes, and we're going to ask answer a listeners question about when is it okay to wear race shirts? Controversial stuff, folks. So thank you for listening. Subscribing rating being so social, tell your friends to subscribe, tell your friends to listen, and let's do this.

Speaker 1:

Alright, Karissa, let's talk about Kenya. Jodi and I were very disappointed that we didn't have a chance to go. Just could not fit it into our schedule and our finances. How was it overall?

Speaker 2:

I mean it's amazing. It's the second time I've gone and you've heard me and Cree and Renee and everybody who's been able to go just rave about what an amazing experience it is. Now it will say for the future, because Wes and I are going to go back, we're going to stay with Paris. So I talked to her in a little bit. It is actually not as expensive as you think. You're basically just flying there.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

And then you really don't pay for. You don't pay for really anything while you're there because you're staying in their home. The food is much less expensive. Now, if you want to go on safari afterwards, that gets a little bit more expensive. But to just get there, just throwing that out there, it's hard to describe and it's not like they don't have what we have. You know what I mean. I don't want it to come across like, but it's just. It is a completely different world. Now we're in rural Kenya. We're in Kapsabet, near Nandy Hills. So you're talking rural clay made one story houses for most people, outhouses not having running water. There's no stop signs. There's not a single street light. There's a few paved ish roads that have gotten much better since the last time we were there. So it's just very, very different. Their clothing stores that they're selling is their selling reused clothes. They're selling clothes that I've been donated and, I guess, shipped there. It's just very, very different.

Speaker 1:

You know, for years I guess they used to. You know, they would make t-shirts and I most people probably know this for both teams that were playing in a Super Bowl or an NBA championship and of course, one team wouldn't win and these shirts were largely useless in this country, so they would send things like that over there. So somewhere over there there are Minnesota Viking Super Bowl championship shirts. Denver Broncos early iteration of the Denver Broncos shirts. San Diego Chargers from 1990. Buffalo Bills San Diego Chargers as well.

Speaker 2:

That would be a little bit of a relic. Yeah, so last time when we were there same vein we had had we had driven to a place called E10, which is another training area. All of the best kiddie marathoners come from, like a one hour radius from this place called Eldoran. It's at altitude, it's very hilly, this is just where a lot of them train. So we go to E10 to have lunch and just kind of see this different training area and we're driving away and they always drive us. So there's the different families that we're friends with. All you know we'll drive the different Mizungos all over with it. But I say stop the car, stop the car, pull over the car. They pull the car and I'm like what is going on? And I jump out and I scream at this man, stop, stop. This man has a Jeff Galloway training hat on, did not?

Speaker 3:

know who.

Speaker 2:

Jeff Galloway was Wow.

Speaker 1:

And then as you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, if you saw on Instagram there was a Disney 2022 10K shirt, I saw.

Speaker 1:

Yep, I did see that.

Speaker 2:

I didn't see any of the pelki running club yet but give us time. That was new.

Speaker 1:

It's growing, it's growing.

Speaker 2:

So, yeah, it was a fantastic trip. I highly encourage anyone to come. The people that we know, the Tanui family, you know Paris' family, all of them would welcome you with open arms.

Speaker 1:

All right. Well, again, it's something we would like to do.

Speaker 2:

It just didn't fit in the schedule this year, well, maybe like four or five years, and we'll go again. So try to think about it. All right, all right.

Speaker 1:

Try to save your money, you lose her. Is that what you're?

Speaker 2:

saying no. I said think about if you want to go. Oh, I'm sorry.

Speaker 1:

I just read.

Speaker 2:

That's your own internal monologue. All right, how about the wedding?

Speaker 1:

How about the wedding? Culturally, I know different than a wedding gear. So what was that experience like? I've been to one wedding outside of the Lower 48 in England and they have a very long reception at the end. I mean it goes just on for hours and hours and hours, which I greatly appreciated because it was open bar. What was it like over there?

Speaker 2:

So there's no open bar, there was no alcohol at the wedding. First of all, it was at a church and they're a very religious people, a very religious area of Paris and Davis. They don't, they don't drink. So Cree, you know, when he was playing in the wedding, was like we won't drink it because they didn't want us to drink anywhere, even at the reception, at other people's houses. And Cree said in Cree's wonderful way we will respect your customs at the church. We would never bring alcohol into your church. We want to, we want to show our support to the congregation and in the reception in the private homes and we will celebrate in the American customs.

Speaker 1:

Well, done Cree.

Speaker 2:

But the wedding started well. I think it was supposed to start at like 10 in the morning. I believe it started around 1045, 11. I like it. Best part of the wedding is that Kree was wearing Renee, our lovely friend Renee. Renee is a dopey, many time dopey finisher, an amazing woman, so sweet.

Speaker 2:

The pastor kept calling her Ronnie because on the program it said Kree and Ronnie R-O-N-N-I-E. She first of all did not know this, that it was printed wrong on the program during the ceremony, so she just wondered why he kept calling her Ronnie. We're crying, laughing, because he must have said it a hundred times like oh, and Ronnie is so beautiful here today. But we realized that when they say Renee the accent can sound like Ronnie. So we believe that is how it happened. But it was really. It shouldn't have been so funny to us, but it was very funny to us because he kept being like we will not pray for Ronnie and we're like who's Ronnie? Who are we praying for? But it was very nice. The main pastor came from Eldorot, which is like an hour drive away. It wasn't that long of a ceremony. What was cool were the different customs where everybody, when they marched in the male side, they all had to do a little dance.

Speaker 1:

Yeah you sent video. It was great.

Speaker 2:

And then the women did the same thing and then the choir would sing. So it was very similar to like a church service in a way and they did the vows. I think the ceremony was probably no more than 30, 45 minutes. I haven't been to a lot of Catholic weddings so I think shorter than that maybe we can.

Speaker 1:

as a recovering Catholic, let me just say we can take our time through or we can blow through pretty quickly depending on that it wasn't that long.

Speaker 2:

So then after that we left the church and then we ate lunch right away. They had a catered lunch, so we sat and ate lunch right away. It was a traditional Kenyan lunch some stewed meats, chipotle rice, vegetables, greens. And then we moved to another tent and the tent setup was beautiful I mean the flowers and we're like where's the tent rental place here in rural Kenya, like where did these tents come from? But they had all the Mizungos, all the big wedding party in a tent. And then we did. We had to all introduce ourselves individually.

Speaker 2:

Okay, All 35-ish of us from America, so that took some time. Again, no alcohol, and then all the church elders no, the village elders came introduced themselves. The church elders came introduced themselves. Korea has a foundation that supports a primary school. The school elders came introduced themselves, so it did take a little while. Then there were speeches and there was cake. So I think we were at the church from like 10 to 3.30.

Speaker 1:

Wow, can I request something Because you deal with the social media stuff? Because I can't do it and I don't understand it. And the other day, when Facebook was down and all it was working for me was Instagram, I almost walked into traffic because I was like I don't understand either way.

Speaker 2:

What do I do? I have to look at my phone and I don't know what to do.

Speaker 1:

When you put a clip of this up. Could you use music? Could you use something from the album Music from the Elder by Kiss, since we've now said since the elders were at the four? If you could just pick one of those songs for the underneath, I would greatly appreciate it. I would Gene Simmons, who we probably have to end up paying to do that. But so there's a lot of introduction A lot of introductions.

Speaker 2:

The cake happened and they tied up her in an apron and a kerchief and she felt like she looked like some. She just felt not her prettiest self after this had happened. But that's the custom. And then the cake was dismantled and you were given like a you know, like the Grinch who stole Christmas, where he was like, takes all the crumb, not even small enough for a mouse. That's what was kind of passed around. We had a little cake crumb, warm soda and a cake crumb.

Speaker 1:

Wow, I believe that's a Neil Young album.

Speaker 2:

So that was it. So then we kind of paused for a little bit, went back to Paris and Davis's home and they were going to host the reception that night, which they did. It was a wonderful, lovely, big meal, like they've been God. They just treated us to so many big, huge meals and like they were just so overwhelming and loving and just you just don't feel like you're worthy of people putting that much effort into. Just you know what I mean. But I decided and I didn't I think this is only after one glass of wine, so this was not influenced by alcohol that I was like Korean Renee have to have a first dance. Well, they did not want to do that. They also didn't have a first dance song, so we decided on a first dance song for them.

Speaker 1:

Oh good, what did we decide?

Speaker 2:

on Some country song oh okay, it'll come to me. It wasn't, it wasn't, oh no it was Faith, it was it's your Love. By Faith Hill and Tim McGraw.

Speaker 1:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

And then because someone else decided that they used to always listen to country when they would drive to go skiing and we felt like that wasn't a super modern song. So then we made Korean Renee dance. And then you know how first dances get awkward.

Speaker 1:

A little bit yeah.

Speaker 2:

So we had other people came up and joined and everyone was dancing and Paris and Davis were dancing. And then song finished and Davis said to me can we do another song? I want to learn how to dance like the Americans. Oh, so sweet.

Speaker 1:

Well, that's fun.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so we did another song. I was going to try, I was trying to convince them to do like a cha-cha slide so we could really show Kenyans how Americans, middle-aged Americans, party.

Speaker 1:

but it didn't Not really sure. That's the culture you want to take.

Speaker 2:

Come on, cha-cha slide's an easy one. I didn't win that one, so Brings up a good question.

Speaker 1:

Can I ask another question?

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Should I raise my hand, like Riley was? Riley was so good in our chat where he would raise his hand when he had a question.

Speaker 2:

And then he would talk to us what was your?

Speaker 1:

first dance song with Weston.

Speaker 2:

It was a why can't?

Speaker 1:

they A Swiftie song.

Speaker 2:

I think they always remember us this way by Lady Gaga from A Star is Born, okay yeah. And then at our wedding they played a version that wasn't sang by Lady Gaga and I was a little bit upset because, like part of me picking, it was like because it was sung by Lady.

Speaker 1:

Gaga.

Speaker 2:

We didn't want a traditional, we didn't want a song that had been done before, and I wanted something different. What about you? I?

Speaker 1:

think If I Should Fall by the Line by Bruce Springsteen, and the great thing about it was that was our first dance together and we closed down the night with the live version of that song from his Live in New York City album, which has, like all the members of the band. It's really, really terrific version. So it was kind of cool to be able to bookend it. And we had no idea when I picked that song and it was kind of my choice. I played it for Joe and it was like she didn't know it. It's from his Lucky Town album, not one of the more popular Springsteen albums. But then the Live in New York came out sometime thereafter and we didn't have a DJ. We just burned CDs for our wedding because we did not want a DJ, because we do a lot of events with DJs and stuff and it's like we just want to play good dance music and I did not want to charge us live.

Speaker 2:

We didn't charge us live already. But let me tell you Big Cat from St Croix. If you need a party, you get Big Cat from St Croix. It was All right, fair enough.

Speaker 1:

But so then that album came out, so we were able to bookend it with the live version. So there you go, but I've gotten off, I've gotten off.

Speaker 2:

No, it's fine.

Speaker 1:

Looking at the reception, I'm glad to know that you didn't even really involve Renee and Kree in the decision on the song.

Speaker 2:

Because they were just going to say no and I feel like they needed a first dance. That was.

Speaker 1:

Why didn't they want a first dance?

Speaker 2:

That's kind of Well, because it wasn't like a it was just in their house, so we were just in their living room. So it wasn't like a they didn't have an entrance, they didn't have all that kind of stuff All right, fair enough.

Speaker 1:

All right and you got to eat a lot of good food. That's it Always about. Now your son is named Ellie Correct and after Elliot Kipchogi.

Speaker 2:

In part yeah.

Speaker 1:

Perhaps happenstance did you get to meet Elliot Kipchogi.

Speaker 2:

So unfortunately and it is very unfortunate, we did it he was coming to the wedding and, if you recall, calvin Kiptem, the world record holder, kenyan athlete, was killed in a car accident.

Speaker 1:

That's a horrible story, the.

Speaker 2:

Thursday. So like just a little over a week before the wedding and and Elliot felt correctly so that he shouldn't be seen celebrating that he should be a morning. He was, you know, he was, they were both Nike athletes but they essentially were a little bit rivals, not in a bad way, you know, but like just from different training camps and everything. So very I was disappointed but, like you obviously understand, like he shouldn't, he needed to be just not publicly out and celebrated.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that was a tragic story.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they were gonna. You know they were gonna face off at the Olympics for the first time, which Elliot ran Tokyo this last weekend, finished 11th. He ran Boston earlier in the year, didn't win that. So the question brings up you know, is he sort of on the tail end of his career? But in talking to Paris, I think offline after the podcast I asked her about Calvin Kiptem because I didn't feel it was appropriate to ask her about that. You know, on air it was more like I just was interested in knowing.

Speaker 2:

And she said she met him in May when they had a big event for, like all the record holders in Kenya. Because she's an Adidas athlete and she primarily trains by herself, so you kind of stay in your own little camps. But she said Elliot is very sort of stoic and if you want to talk to Elliot you usually need to go through his manager. Like you know, he's not a gregarious outgoing personality, but she said Calvin Kiptem was. He was this big, bold personality. He loved meeting people, he loved, you know, interacting. I just still can't get over that just absolute tragedy. Because he was going to run Rotterdam relatively soon. She said he was 100% confident he could run a 158, which is unheard of. And she said he thought that before his career was done he could run a 150 marathon.

Speaker 1:

That's.

Speaker 2:

And we'll never I mean, and we may.

Speaker 1:

It is pretty remarkable how we keep running, more people keep running more quickly and more quickly, because you think that at a certain point there's a there's kind of an ending point where this, we can't do any go any faster. But I wouldn't, I wouldn't put it past somebody to get to a 150 at that point. But man, what a tragedy for the whole running community.

Speaker 2:

And I will say one more thing about him and talking about like well, how did he get so good? So most great marathoners come up the ranks of track of 5k, 10k, then they go to the shorter road distance. He just basically came up and was a marathon and he was. He was running really, really high volumes, basically always at race pace, so his body was just super conditioned. So the thought process was he's not going to have a long career because he's training a little bit too hard, but he's going to have a great career. Um, but unfortunately that he had a great career.

Speaker 2:

He is the world record holder and I don't know how. It will be a little bit of time before someone can break his world record, because he broke Elliott's world record, so it didn't get to meet Elliott. Hopefully that will happen in the future, but, um, yeah, still such a tragic situation. So, but that was my trip to Kenya. I have lots more to say, but we gotta Gotta move on and talk more. Talk to Paris. But if you have any questions, let me know and I can't wait to go back in a few years.

Speaker 1:

All right. Do we need to do this, sarah, or can you?

Speaker 2:

grab from the one we did before. Just do it, so it's easier.

Speaker 1:

Okay, all right, we want to thank Sarah acres with runs on magic. As a lover of run Disney herself, sarah's always loves helping plan those magical weekends. But the world is your oyster With Sarah's help, need Sarah's help, saying oyster, so I'm going to do that again.

Speaker 2:

All right, just pull up on the other one, I'm just fine, do it again.

Speaker 1:

Do it again, you're fine, yeah, I'm gonna do it again. Hey, we want to thank Sarah acres with runs on magic. As a lover of run Disney herself, sarah always loves helping plan those magical weekends. But the world is your oyster with Sarah's help, whether you're looking to book a honeymoon getaway, an all-inclusive girls trip, a boys weekend, family cruise, international adventure, whatever, she is here and at your service.

Speaker 2:

That's right Complimentary travel planning services, personalized itineraries specializing in run Disney universal and cruise vacations, like I had. When you book, use the code three, two, one, go for some extra special goodies. And you can find her on instagram at runs on magic, where she shares special offers and more, or email her at runs on magic travel at gmailcom.

Speaker 3:

Okay civilians.

Speaker 2:

It's time for the goods. Let's get on to the interview. As many of you know and I just talked about it I went to Kenya in February for Cree Kelly's wedding. We were so honored to say this woman's newly finished nine bedroom home while we were there. Uh, what said? I first formed a relationship with Paris and her husband Davis, five years ago on our first trip to Kenya, and since then, what a trip Paris has been on. She set a world record in the half marathon. She also set a 15k record in the process of that half marathon world record. She won the new york city marathon, she won the boston marathon and she is your rating 2020 olympic gold medalist in the marathon from tokyo. She is a mom to beautiful natalia, a great cook and an overall amazing Human. Here is my sit-down interview in her home in rural kina with Paris chip cheer cheer. All right, we are here with olympic champion, new york city marathon champion, boston marathon champion mom Paris chip cheer cheer. Yeah, how are you? I'm good. Where are you I?

Speaker 2:

mean cups a bit at home at your beautiful home that you have graciously let us stay in for mr Kelly's wedding. So thank you, welcome. When americans think of kina, we think of a lot of talented runners. Yes, how did they discover that you were very talented? When did that happen?

Speaker 3:

Uh, when I was at school. You know, yeah, in kina we have uh interschool competitions, so I used to like it to go to run. I used to run whole, almost whole events when I was in school, primary school. You understand, when you say 800 meters, you are there, 15, you are there. So. But by the time I was growing up and I uh one of my cousin brother see it and say that this lady has a, this color as a talent. So he natured me, he mentored me, yeah, so I started running when I was in Um primary school in kina and you loved running then.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I run. I like it Because where I am now. Yeah, it's because of running. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

You made the 2020 olympic team which raced in 2021. Yes, what did it feel like when you found out that you were going to the olympics?

Speaker 3:

I would feel great. That was my dream too, and my prayer and and, uh, my wish is that to be among the the olympics 2024 in paris.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yes, and we know you're still working towards that. What was it like being in tokyo? Because it was when there was cove it. There was nobody there. Was it strange in new york? No, when you were in japan for the olympics, oh, okay.

Speaker 3:

You know, at that time I uh, I was in a kredship, I remember, because I was not in a team before but by the time I run my second marathon in falencia, where's 2020, and I ran good time. So they decided to put me in the team and At that time I was in a good shape because I remember I run a World, world championship record and I ran record only women Uh, I was in a great shape. Yeah, so I think I trained when it was covey time. People are maybe locked down in their houses, but for me, I used to travel to tibia nation, where I think you saw it yesterday.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

I used to go there with my pacemakers and we continued training because after that I was coming from maternity and I was trying to, to, to, to regain back my shape that I was before 2017.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, when we talk about your olympic race. You ran a wonderful race. At what point did you know I will win?

Speaker 3:

You know, like in the Olympics, we prepare for long, from January to August. That was the only race that I was waiting for, so it was a prolonged training. So I trained seriously and by the time I was in 30 kilometers I felt it, though it was humid, but I was feeling still energetic. But when I was in 35 kilometers I knew it I'm gonna win.

Speaker 2:

How did that feel to be an Olympic gold medalist?

Speaker 3:

I was feeling good. I feel great because it was my first time there to be an Olympic and it was my third marathon. It was unbelievable. I was not expecting that. You know, like when we were going in Kenya at that time, fridges Koske was record holder and Roots of the heritage was strong. So I knew it was stronger than even me, but it was unbelievable.

Speaker 2:

We were so excited watching you yelling and screaming. How did your life in Kenya change, or did it after you came back as the Olympic Marathon Champion?

Speaker 3:

I can say that my life, my personal life, I remain like Paris is unusual, but many things have changed, especially the maybe economic. It's changed a lot to be a gold medalist, because when I'm going for the races I get more appearance than before. People used to respect me as an Olympic champion. I didn't knew that when you won an Olympic you will experience many things from even people. Maybe you cannot know yourself more, but people know you, even me. I cannot introduce myself more than other people used to introduce me, but I remain as Paris. But I thank God because I go in another level that I was not expecting.

Speaker 2:

So after the Olympics, then your next big race was the New York City Marathon, and which you won. How did that race compare to the Olympics? Was it harder? Did you feel a lot of pressure after being the Olympic Champion?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know, when somebody who is in an Olympic champion, many people have hopes on you, highs on you. But when I was going to New York it was short time and from the Olympics the unit there was high so I came to take time to recover but because of maybe the training that I trained before the Olympics, that's the same training I used in New York City Marathon.

Speaker 2:

The New York City Marathon is a very challenging marathon For you physically. Did it get to a point where it was really hard?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it was hard. I can say that maybe it was my first time to be there to run it. I didn't see too much difficulties, like Boston.

Speaker 2:

You thought Boston was hard, yeah, even Boston.

Speaker 3:

I won it. But I won Boston. But I used a lot of energy, I struggled a lot. And then New York City Marathon but I ended up being feared again. I was having that fear to run Boston Marathon again. But New York still have good memories over there because even last year I was expecting, I was so happy and glad to be there again, but only know like, thank God, I didn't knew that I would have a calf injury. But I know one day, one time I will go back and I will win again.

Speaker 2:

Yes. So this year in November, you did get to go to New York, though with your family. Yes, and that was your husband's first time in New York, your daughter Natalia's first time in New York. Did they like New York?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, they like New York and I really, really appreciate and thank to the Resorganizer of New York because he had my problem but he's still resisting us to go there and he was still enough hope for me. He said maybe by Saturday, maybe you will be recovering, yeah, and I was so excited to be with Natalia because it was the first time for Natalia to, and you know Natalia cried a lot, she did, yeah, when O'Berry ran. And then the girl of O'Berry, tanya, come and tell Natalia we are going to watch a game there because my mom won. So I was like I cried a lot and said mom, why, why? You see, now you are supposed to be there watching, yeah, but only know like, thank God we were there and she enjoyed being the city of New York and even, but Natalia Davis enjoyed, yeah, Natalia likes it when you win.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know, natalia, when he was growing up usually see his mom winning, yeah, yeah. But I remember when I was 13 in London Marathon he was happy Tell me, mama, I know you were 13 because you were having injury. You know he knew that injury because I was having even catheter in my body, so he knew it. Even he was crying saying mommy, are you going to run again? I told her I will and at that time, when I was start, he appreciated a lot. Yeah, he was so happy. He said you were having injury but you became that mama, congratulations. But when I came back again, go and run, great, no turn he was so happy because I won All love. He was so grateful. Again, he was so happy.

Speaker 2:

She's such a good cheerleader for your show.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, yeah she loves you so much.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so what did you look up to, or did you look up to when you were younger, running? Who were your Kenyan idols?

Speaker 3:

You know, at that time we were hard about the Declan Lorobe. Edinaki Blaget before yeah.

Speaker 3:

She's still around, edna's still around, yeah those were the people who we were hard about them because at that time we were not even watching the TV. They were not televisions in our remote areas, so we were harding that. They see some people who are running, even at school, when we were reading in the book history we wish to watch, to read about history of runners, people. So when I came back I was mentored by Mary Kayton. I was like the way Mary Kayton was running, the way he used to win, he was a fighter, yeah, and he mentored me a lot. I would say I want to be like Mary Kayton and I love my manager Demadona, because he was telling me I see, you can't even run more than Mary Kayton, and at that time I want to be told me you see, I told you you are stronger.

Speaker 2:

So we are here visiting you where you live in Kapsabad and there are so many great runners and camps all over and it's our second time being here. Can you talk a little bit about what is so special about this community here for the Kenyan runners?

Speaker 3:

Oh, I can say that, you know, in Kenya at least, they are going for high altitude, but I think Kapsabad, the first high altitude places is Kapsabad, itain, followed by Kapsabad. But like me, I like Kapsabad. I tried it and it was too cold so I came here. It depends on you know, in Kapsabad it's good because it's going up down hills here, but Itain is flat a little bit. But it depends on someone who can choose here. But for me I choose to train in Kapsabad. I choose to stay in Kapsabad because for me, I came from Tarbu, far away from here, and my husband was from Bomet. We were supposed to stay in Bomet over there, but I decided to choose here because I like here, I like the people of Kapsabad. Yeah, they are good people.

Speaker 3:

So I decided to train here and live here.

Speaker 2:

When you pass other runners in training, do they kind of you look at each other and nod like do you just keep going? Do you say hi?

Speaker 3:

Sometimes when I'm going to the Easee run you can crit, but when you are running faster you are concentrating with what you are doing. But maybe when we were running some kids they know us. They just say hi, you are supposed to crit because they are still young.

Speaker 2:

When you are running and you are going fast and it's not easy, it's hard, and you maybe think I can't do this. What do you say to yourself to keep going?

Speaker 3:

You know, in training, training is that tough than even a race. When you manage in training, you know you will win. And sometimes it's difficult. Like me, I don't have coach, so it's difficult for me sometimes to sleep when I'm knowing other people are running. You are not going to run alone, you are going for competition. So that's in my mind. I used to say, no, I'm supposed to do something. I know it's painful but I have to. But like now in another category, people are following you, they want to see your performance. You know so. Even me, I used to worry. Sometimes when Injured is come, I say how did my fans say? How did my management say? You know that you feel so much disappointed. But all in all, we appreciate and we continue with life.

Speaker 2:

What is your typical training week like? Like a week of training. How many times do you run?

Speaker 3:

I run from Monday to Saturday. I usually rest only on Sundays.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, here is your gold medal. I have it. It's hidden. No one wants to know when is it.

Speaker 3:

I remember they requested me to show them. I have it. It's there. We wanted to see it, yeah you can.

Speaker 2:

I had two more questions. It seems like in the past 10 years, more moms are still winning in racing. How do you balance being a mom, and was that hard when you first came back?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's not easy to lose weight when you go to the mountain. It's a lot of weight to come back. It's not easy because it's not like before you didn't have a kid, because maybe you wake up any time you go. No one needs your time. But all in all, I can say that as a mom, you have to love it because they are part of success in your life, like Natalia is part of success in my life. When I came to Natalia, I think I started to run well because I knew there is someone depending on me. There is someone looking after me. So it was not easy but I thank God I managed. But it's up to you to love it.

Speaker 2:

It is hard and it's good that you are an example.

Speaker 3:

You have to accept Good good, good.

Speaker 2:

Last question how can Americans follow you and keep up with what you're doing? How can we follow you and how can we support you?

Speaker 3:

As an athlete.

Speaker 2:

As Paris, as an athlete, how can we follow you?

Speaker 3:

I can say that nowadays Americans are stronger. Even I was saying like trials, they are 222. They are strong. I know nowadays they have known I think before they used to go to work and they were running into a spot of time People. At that time I think they were not serious in training. But I see now Americans are training a lot, they are serious, they are going for a camp, they just look for the day to train seriously. But before they were not serious. That's why you end up seeing Kenya before they were all winning races Africans, because, like me, I don't have another work to do, just for training only. But I see that maybe America and other countries they have come to know that training hard, winning is easy. When you train a lot, train, train, you win it easy.

Speaker 2:

You're still faster than most of the Americans, but you did have Americans with a third medal.

Speaker 3:

You remember, like in Olympic marathon, not.

Speaker 2:

Mali.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, mali has become that and there were Kenyans, there were many people there.

Speaker 2:

Are you friends with or do you know the Kenyan Americans now, like Alephine and Betsy? Are you friends?

Speaker 3:

with them. Yeah, we are friends. We used to chat even before. Even you know social media make us even it's not a mass amount to visit you or to come to your place, but we normally chat. We speak through social media. You maybe wish somebody all the best, like Betty Saina. We were wishing her all the best in trials in America. We were having a lot of ups, knowing that it's going to be in a team of Olympic, but holding on. We thank God and we congratulate for those who manage, because we know in competition we need each other and to be a champion, olympic champion is that you cannot be alone. You need all countries so that you can be an Olympic champion.

Speaker 2:

You like teamwork? Do you like teamwork in races?

Speaker 3:

Like me. I like it Because when we were sent by my country that go and do this as a teamwork, you follow what your coaches are telling you Because, like Olympic and championship, you are going to represent your country. So you are supposed to have a team so that maybe you can run, because we are not going there like a Major Marathon. I am going for myself to win by myself, but that one is for team. So for me I like teamwork anyway, because I remember ladies when they are there I am not going to run. They say no, no, no, no. So people know. Even my colleagues in Kenya used to say whatever person, we are happy because I know how to, just for me, I used to tell someone later they say it's difficult but we have to have passion. It's not easy to pass a fear on it.

Speaker 2:

I think last question what is your happiest moment in running?

Speaker 3:

Olympic. I was not expecting.

Speaker 2:

What was it like when you heard your national anthem?

Speaker 3:

I feel great. I have won, let me say, world of Championships, like only women in World of. But it's not like Olympic, because I was not expecting, and I was my price, to be in Olympic one day, one time, but I was not expecting to be soon to be 2020.

Speaker 2:

Good. Well, we wish you the best of luck as you go. You have a half marathon next week. You will hear this later, but she is leaving. We will let you know how she does. Paris has been so gracious to host not us but, I think, eight other groups of people here in her beautiful home with her husband, davis, and her daughter. So thank you, paris, and we will be following your journey. Thank you All the way.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much and now let's go find the gold medal. Yeah, all right, athletes, here's the drill Time to shape up your diet. Harissa, give them the goods. All right, johnny, as we're taping this, this is the beginning of March and this is where New Year's goals, or just health goals, go to die. How do you feel about that judgment?

Speaker 1:

I feel like I'm being seen a little bit, though I will say my running goal has been I've done pretty well comparatively. I'm really proud of you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it just seems cyclical, though. Like we get into January, we've got these big goals, we're focused. February, it's still winter, and then March we see the sun and the light. What happens, I think, is that we don't feel good about the changes we've made or we don't want to critically look at what we have in accomplishment. I think that's the cap not accomplished. I think we don't want to be vulnerable, we just want to ignore it, move on and not go back and have to say, oh, I said I was doing this, where am I? With that? It becomes a paralysis of motivation.

Speaker 2:

So in healthier you in April, we are going to focus on motivation, focus on staying track, focus on finding positive when you don't reach your goals or life got too busy and then you're ashamed. We're going to try to fix that negative cycle and we're going to bring in an expert Jeff Galloway is going to join us for our monthly chat in April, which we'll talk about for a minute. But this is a common situation feeling unmotivated to make any changes, but nutritionally especially. So if this happens to you, start small, take your big nutrition goals and break them down even further to like one thing you can accomplish a day. Is it an extra serving of vegetables? Is it actually having breakfast? Is it switching out your midday snack? Just one little thing a day. That will kind of build that momentum and your motivation over time.

Speaker 2:

And then think about your why. Why did you want to make nutrition changes in January? Why did you want to run a 10K, john? When you remember your why, that's that motivation that's going to help you keep going, because the why is important and you get. You don't have to make massive strides every day. You don't have to run 6.2 miles every day and you're sure it, but that's another story.

Speaker 2:

But think about your why and then seek support. That's why we have healthier you. That's why we have the chats to help people about your goals, which again is opening yourself up to vulnerability. But then you get that support and then you get the sounding board and someone's sort of nudge you in the right direction. So we're here at healthier you to help you be a healthier you, whether it's weighing less, whether it's improving the quality of your diet, whether it's improving your energy, whether it's improving any of those states, if you're a new mom coming back, we're here to support you. It's all about motivation in April. So join now. Use the code Jeff, which is a bigger code than our usual podcast code. Don't tell the other podcasts. You can go to gallowaycoursecom to sign up. Athletes, listen up, it's mail call time.

Speaker 3:

Announce a free present.

Speaker 1:

All right, sarge. This one came to our three to one go podcast Gmail account and it's from Aaron and he asks and this is really interesting to me and you're really you're going to have to answer this, carissa, because, as you know, I only have one of these things that's mentioned what's the etiquette on race shirts and medals? Should you wear a race shirt before a race, during, after and when to wear a challenge medal versus a coast to coast? I should say I do have a shirt and a medal, so just one.

Speaker 2:

Did you run the race in your race shirt?

Speaker 1:

I did not.

Speaker 2:

I feel like answering this question can only do me harm.

Speaker 1:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

So I'll give you my honest opinion. I don't think you wear a race shirt until you finish the race.

Speaker 1:

So it's the equivalent of wearing the concert T-shirt at the concert, wearing an old concert T-shirt like an old race shirt from a previous race.

Speaker 2:

Don't really find, because you finished that race you have to.

Speaker 2:

Well, maybe you. The thought is that you've completed that race. So the only exception to the rule, I think, is you get there. It's really cold. You're wearing a long sleeve shirt You're going to wear it in the beginning, that kind of thing but it's a telltale sign, john, and you can probably maybe you'll agree with us. We're announcing a local 5K, a smaller race. They've got the race shirt on and their bib pinned on their back. First timer, right, am I wrong? Tell me I'm wrong. You're laughing because you know I'm right.

Speaker 1:

Well, now let me ask you this let's delve into this a little bit, because this is interesting to me, because I do believe you don't wear the concert T-shirt to the concert. I'm thinking, you know, when you get a shirt for doing a run Disney race, you know they try to make them kind of cool, neat shirts and you want that finish line photo and you're not one of these costume warriors, we'll throw all of them out. The people who are, you know we love them, but throw all of them out. So, as opposed to wearing just your ASIC's T-shirt or run for wine or whatever it is, wearing the shirt from the race you ran is going to give it context in the photo at the end.

Speaker 2:

Again, I'm not judging you. I just it's like bad juju for me, in my opinion, to wear a race shirt before you have finished the race. Like, I think, like even I'm going to do a 5K, I wore the race and I sprayed my ink. I can't finish the race it's because I wore the race shirt. Like that's my mindset, I will say, because someone might call us out on this Western War has worn a race shirt to run because I was Sisu and he was going to wear the matching Sisu shirt and he cut it and made it a tank top and it was like part of the costume.

Speaker 2:

So again, and I think I probably did shame him for that, so, erin, you tell us, aeron, is it okay to wear the race shirt? And again, if you do this, please don't stop doing it because, seriously, who are we With the medals? I think that wearing a challenge medal versus a coast to coast, I think the medals are heavy. I think you pick which one maybe you're most proud of. I think usually I would say what I've seen is that the coast to coast tends to be like the Trumper oh God, I said Trump, that is the Trump.

Speaker 1:

Edit, edit.

Speaker 2:

The coast to coast medal. I felt like people would wear that over the challenge because that was too too close. Blah, blah, blah. But yeah, that's an interesting one. Did you ever wear your medal after the race? Did you even take it out of the plastic?

Speaker 1:

I did take it out of the plastic to look at it, but I did never wear. I have never.

Speaker 2:

I don't really wear the medal, they're actually heavy.

Speaker 1:

They are heavy, but I mean I get it. People again go to the Magic Kingdom. The next day.

Speaker 2:

It's so fun, yeah, to see everybody.

Speaker 1:

It's all cool. People wear them where they put us up, generally Animal Kingdom Lodge folks coming in and it's great to see them and I always try to shout out and say congratulations. So I get it. I just felt dubious doing it because it's me, it's like it's me.

Speaker 2:

I mean, yeah, Wesson doesn't do much with his medals either, but yeah, that's the skinny on the race shirts. That was a great question, Erin.

Speaker 3:

Keep them coming.

Speaker 2:

Email us at 321gopodcast at gmailcom. Give them to us on Instagram. We also oftentimes share listener stories, so if you have one, send it to us. We'll share it and thanks for listening.

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