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BBBrooke: From Runner to Entrepreneur - The Magic of the runDisney Community

March 28, 2024 Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey Season 1 Episode 44
BBBrooke: From Runner to Entrepreneur - The Magic of the runDisney Community
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321 GO!
BBBrooke: From Runner to Entrepreneur - The Magic of the runDisney Community
Mar 28, 2024 Season 1 Episode 44
Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey

BBBrooke is a beacon of light in the runDisney community and a creative force behind must-have Disney-themed accessories. Brooke's journey from starting line to entrepreneurial success is as captivating as the fairy tales we've grown to love. Whether you're a seasoned marathoner or a Disney devotee, her story of transformation, underscored by the clinking of medals and the rustling of tulle at the expo, is set to stir your soul.

But it's not all giggles and glitter; we tread into the profound depths of mental health, sharing our own vulnerabilities and the immense strength found in the simple act of asking for help. Brooke's openness about her therapeutic journey invites you to reflect on your own battles, while the shared stories of resilience remind us that we're all part of a larger, interconnected narrative. So, grab your earbuds and a protein-packed snack, because this episode is not just a run through the park—it's a heartfelt sprint into the essence of community, endurance, and the enchanting power of storytelling.

Send us a Text Message.

Support the Show.

Let Registered Dietitian Carissa Galloway lead you through a science-backed plan to transform the way you think about your diet.
Visit www.GallowayCourse.com and use the code PODCAST at checkout for a great discount!

Become a 321 Go! Supporter. Help us continue to create! HERE

Join Customized + over a $500 discount! HERE you get-

  • 6 Months of Customized Training
  • 6 Months of Healthier U chats
  • 30-day Summer Nutrition Shake Up


Follow us! @321GoPodcast @carissa_gway @pelkman19

Email us 321GoPodcast@gmail.com

Order Carissa's New Book - Run Walk Eat

Improve sleep, boost recovery and perform at your best with PILLAR’s range of magnesium recovery supplements.
Use code 321GO at www.theFeed.com to get 15% off

Let Sara Akers with RunsOnMagic plan your next runDisney weekend!
IG @runsonmagic or you can go to www.RUNSONMAGIC.com or email her ...

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

BBBrooke is a beacon of light in the runDisney community and a creative force behind must-have Disney-themed accessories. Brooke's journey from starting line to entrepreneurial success is as captivating as the fairy tales we've grown to love. Whether you're a seasoned marathoner or a Disney devotee, her story of transformation, underscored by the clinking of medals and the rustling of tulle at the expo, is set to stir your soul.

But it's not all giggles and glitter; we tread into the profound depths of mental health, sharing our own vulnerabilities and the immense strength found in the simple act of asking for help. Brooke's openness about her therapeutic journey invites you to reflect on your own battles, while the shared stories of resilience remind us that we're all part of a larger, interconnected narrative. So, grab your earbuds and a protein-packed snack, because this episode is not just a run through the park—it's a heartfelt sprint into the essence of community, endurance, and the enchanting power of storytelling.

Send us a Text Message.

Support the Show.

Let Registered Dietitian Carissa Galloway lead you through a science-backed plan to transform the way you think about your diet.
Visit www.GallowayCourse.com and use the code PODCAST at checkout for a great discount!

Become a 321 Go! Supporter. Help us continue to create! HERE

Join Customized + over a $500 discount! HERE you get-

  • 6 Months of Customized Training
  • 6 Months of Healthier U chats
  • 30-day Summer Nutrition Shake Up


Follow us! @321GoPodcast @carissa_gway @pelkman19

Email us 321GoPodcast@gmail.com

Order Carissa's New Book - Run Walk Eat

Improve sleep, boost recovery and perform at your best with PILLAR’s range of magnesium recovery supplements.
Use code 321GO at www.theFeed.com to get 15% off

Let Sara Akers with RunsOnMagic plan your next runDisney weekend!
IG @runsonmagic or you can go to www.RUNSONMAGIC.com or email her ...

Speaker 1:

Welcome to 3-2-1-Go the Podcast. I'm John Pelkey.

Speaker 2:

And I'm Carissa Galloway and we're bringing you stories from start to finish to keep the everyday athlete motivated to keep moving towards the next finish.

Speaker 1:

Today we are very excited to have B-B-B-Brooke. No, it's B-B-Brooke.

Speaker 2:

We establish this later in the podcast, but yes, we're going to find that out.

Speaker 1:

That's why we're excited. It's two B's's. Bb Brooke we establish this later in the podcast, but yes.

Speaker 2:

We're going to find that out. It's two Bs and a Brooke, but yes, and she's great.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, well, if you're one of her 118,000 plus Instagram followers, I'm sorry, was that a mistype? It's not a mistype, that is true, accurate. All right, then you know. She's a dreamer, creator, organizer, stay-up-all-nighter, magic-loving girl who, as she says, is living in a magical world. She's a Disney fan, a run-Disney runner, and now you can see her at expos too. And we will get to the bottom of it. Is it BBB Brooke or BB Brooke? We promise.

Speaker 2:

That's right. I love Brooke. She started her run-Disney journey years ago in the olden days, if you will with the first glass slipper challenge and, like all of us, she was hooked. Now she's taken her joyful spirit to the expo, where you can find the cutest BB brook ears, jewelry, headbands and more. Today, in Healthier you, we're going to talk about the huge benefits of protein at breakfast and we'll share a listener story from Ashton about her first marathon. John, before I move on, did you like how I wrote your intro sentence today? Did you enjoy it?

Speaker 1:

I did yes, weston has.

Speaker 2:

Grammarly and it edited it for me, so it seemed like it was an improvement on my usual run on sentence. For those of you, if you've got grammar tips for us, audio tips, don't give us those, give those to Weston. But thank you guys for all the tips for listening, for sharing, for your support and sharing your why your Run Disney, why we truly love reading all of your emails. If you like us, please rate us, subscribe and check the show notes for how to support the show. Let's do this All right before we dive in to Brooke. We've got, I think, a fun chat today because, john, I want to know I got my hair done on Monday. Did you find, or your wife find, my hairdresser's dog?

Speaker 1:

Okay. Well, I'm just going to correct you and say our hairdresser's dog.

Speaker 2:

Okay, true, I'm sorry your hairdresser is my stylist.

Speaker 1:

Stylist is like has, how I like to say. But well, I did not. Actually my wife did. Our stylist lives just. Maddie lives just a couple of doors down from me, as frequent listeners may or may not know, and she has two great dogs and one of her dogs got out, the big, fluffy white dog named, named Roger, who is just hysterical. Somehow the dog got out.

Speaker 2:

So she was doing something with a fence and a fence was down, and she didn't remember All I got was the story?

Speaker 1:

was the dog's gotten out? Because she texted Jodi and just asked where we were. And we were heading back home. I can't 100% remember, but we both got in our cars and drove around the neighborhood. It hadn't been long. We knew it hadn't been long and dogs generally don't go that far, so drove around. Drove around, just started making larger and larger circles trying to find the dog, and what actually happened was Jodi, and probably should get her on the podcast, though we're doing spring cleaning today.

Speaker 3:

So I want to stop her in the middle.

Speaker 1:

I know, yeah, just massive spring cleaning. She was headed back to our house in this area and the dog was essentially in the front yard, because they have a tendency to come home. So Jodi actually was the one who wrangled Roger and took him inside to Maddie's house and let her know. So the dog found its way home. But yes, jodi actually found the dog and let me just tell you that is as stressful a thing as can happen if you're a pet owner. Clearly.

Speaker 2:

Yes, and she was just, she was still upset, like telling me retelling the story.

Speaker 2:

Because I guess the other neighbor came and knocked on her door to tell her but she didn't hear it because she was outside and, yeah, anybody that's lost a pet, it's super stressful. But then what I told her was what I know you and Jodi love dogs, but we were in Atlanta. There were several, several times where there'd be a dog and like you guys, like legit love dogs you guys would be both be over talking to the owner for like 10, 15 minutes. I guess I have only seen you with your dogs, because at Disney there's not a lot of dogs and when they're in the corrals you cannot get down there and touch them.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, they're service dogs and you should always. You know, some owners allow you to pet them, but that's something you should ask. But these were just dogs hanging out. You're right, I will always spend more time with the dogs than the people. Don't take it personally. People, it's not you, it's just all of you. I don't like as much and I include everyone on earth, including my wife. I don't like any of them more than dogs, and she would say the same thing about me.

Speaker 2:

John, I think someday, as your prestige continues to elevate right, stick with me on this one that you should have like create your own charity 5K, a people dog, not even a 5K. Maybe it's a one mile human dog race for charity, because I think you would love that.

Speaker 1:

That is true.

Speaker 2:

Jodi's agreeing with me.

Speaker 1:

Mrs. Announcer 2 is yelling. Jodi, please go back to cleaning. That is true.

Speaker 2:

She can't hear me, mrs. Announcer 2 is yelling. Please go back to cleaning. That is true. She can't hear me, can she hear me?

Speaker 1:

No, no, she can't hear you. No, but that would be a great thing for you.

Speaker 1:

Actually the folks at the Galactic Star Cruiser put together a 5K for my wife Now she doesn't run the Pet Rescue anymore, she's still involved, kind of the emeritus person. We actually had to get together the other day. But they actually put together a 5K, made medals and everything for the Star Cruiser cast and the proceeds did go to a Better Life Pet Rescue right here in Ocoee and you know that would be a great idea. I would love to do that. One of my favorite parts of St Pete RunFest now is we have a dog trot for St Pete RunFest. So yes, please keep your dogs coming.

Speaker 2:

Putting it out in the universe the John Pelkey pup race Pelkey pup race.

Speaker 1:

We're waiting for my prestige to grow.

Speaker 2:

The Pelkey prestigious pup race. There it is.

Speaker 1:

All right, the Pelkey Running Club would be in evidence by the way.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, hats, you can get the hats.

Speaker 1:

Want to shout out to those folks the hats are in, apparently.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and they're going.

Speaker 1:

The pre-ordered hats are in for the Pelkey Running Club and people are actually buying them. I believe I'm close to having tens of fans, which I'm very excited about.

Speaker 2:

As we all, prestige is growing.

Speaker 1:

Very excited about it. All right, I have a very serious question here. Is it wrong for people to make an entire turkey a holiday-like turkey meal? Turkey with all the fixings, stuffing, cranberry sauce, peas though they didn't have the pearl onions this time, which was a little disappointing. It's my fault, I didn't do it. All of that stuff that's the traditional Christmas Thanksgiving meal. Is it wrong to do that, say I don't know, somewhere like the third week of March?

Speaker 2:

Is this a nutritional question or a social question?

Speaker 1:

When would I ever care about nutrition?

Speaker 2:

Okay.

Speaker 1:

No, it is a social question in all truth.

Speaker 2:

So I did not know you were asking this question, right, okay, right, no, I'm letting people know?

Speaker 1:

No, you did not know.

Speaker 2:

you were asking this question, right, okay, right, no, I'm letting people know.

Speaker 1:

No, you did not know.

Speaker 2:

Last night for dinner, weston and I had a baked turkey breast, mashed cauliflower, cranberry sauce and Hawaiian stuffing mix, because it was in my pantry since Thanksgiving and it sounds delicious. And asparagus and he had a roll. So John no, delicious. And asparagus and he had a roll. So John, no. Now in defense, I believe you did the full, like long version of the meal, but we had sort of a quick version, which we probably do once a month because it's Weston's favorite meal.

Speaker 1:

I'm just curious. It is my favorite meal as well. I did not know that Weston and I well the mashed potatoes for the mashed cauliflower, though I do like mashed cauliflower.

Speaker 2:

I made the quick ones like the, I do like I couldn't find them. I made the quick ones, like the microwave ones, and I couldn't find potatoes at Aldi and I was with Elliot and I was like, ah, the cauliflower is fine, because we were having stuffing too, so we didn't need an, a normal.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I did. Uh, I did the mashed potatoes. Uh, from scratch the stuffing. I did get pre-spiced crouton thing to make their easy stuffing. I didn't go the completely from scratch stuffing. Now, the reason that we did it and I was telling you this just before we got on air when I was explaining what the question was going to be is that I work at Universal Studios Florida. I have worked there almost consistently since 1990. It did take a couple of years where I wasn't working and I went back Consistently since 1990. It did take a couple of years where I wasn't working and I went back. One of the nice things they do is all their team members get a turkey around the holidays. I think it's. I'm not sure if it's prior to Thanksgiving or they do it after. I can't remember that. Anyway, you get a turkey, your year-end turkey.

Speaker 2:

How many pounds are we talking here?

Speaker 1:

What's that? How many?

Speaker 2:

pounds. I need to paint the full 11 and a half.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I don't think I've ever cooked a turkey.

Speaker 2:

Maybe that's the biggest turkey I've cooked, because we always have small Thanksgivings, as we've talked about go on.

Speaker 1:

Right. Yeah, no, I've done bigger, but you know that's average. I think it's around an 11 to 12 pound turkey. It seems to be. As I was Googling making sure I had the right temperatures, and all a lot of opinions on how you cook a turkey. If you ever Google that one, there's an awful lot.

Speaker 2:

You think there are a lot of political opinions. I believe there are more opinions than that. We're just about two months from talking about the holidays again, so we'll touch back on that in early May.

Speaker 1:

And if you like to play Christmas music, you want me to play Christmas music in the background to make you feel better about all this. Anyway, so we get the turkey and, as we pointed out here, I always work on Thanksgiving, so we don't use the turkey. Generally, on Christmas we do something with Jodi's mom and we have before actually used the turkey and done that, but this year we did something over at her place and she cooked, so it didn't have to worry.

Speaker 1:

So the turkey's been in the freezer, and a turkey takes up a lot of space in the freezer yeah, so we just finally decided it usually sits around to like special occasions yeah, so we just finally decided it usually sits around to like special occasions. But I'm curious about it because you know people will do a roast chicken.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, At any point in time.

Speaker 1:

Sunday supper yeah, Roast chicken with potatoes Almost all the same things. San's cranberry sauce. I believe cranberry sauce is the international signal for holiday, apparently at a meal.

Speaker 2:

And for Weston it's a sandwich condiment.

Speaker 1:

Well, and we could spend hours talking about the after Thanksgiving meal, thanksgiving sandwiches, which is what I'm eating now on Hawaiian rolls for the next week and a half, and I'm making the turkey soup. But we just said, why not make this? Also great thing about it we love leftovers. You always have a lot of leftovers Good stuff so I'm not sure why turkey gets relegated to only a holiday meal like the full turkey.

Speaker 2:

And isn't it true? They didn't even actually have turkey on the first Thanksgiving.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I don't think any of the first Thanksgiving is true. First of all, I think it was the middle of July, I think it took place in St Bart's. I believe it was more like a water skiing thing that they had going on down there. But you know, history is generally written by the winners and they change it who lives, who dies, who tells your story? John, very nice, alright. So I'm glad that you are in agreement that there's nothing wrong with the full turkey meal at any point in time.

Speaker 2:

No, they're great flavors and Weston likes it, so we do it quickly. Sometimes We'll just do a rotisserie chicken cranberry sauce, we'll make the quick stuffing and a vegetable, and then he's thrilled. So it's part of our rotation. Because lean meat cranberries are a little bit sugary, watch out. But if you add a vegetable and a potato, you're checking the boxes and you're all right there. It's better than fried chicken.

Speaker 1:

It's better than a burger. I like homemade cranberry sauce, but the stuff in the can is nostalgic and I just need a small shaving. I don't need a lot of it because it's got a lot of flavor. That guy loves it.

Speaker 2:

Even my kids were both forced to eat two bites of turkey yesterday and Claire, who you know is extremely picky, did not, did not complain. Elliot complained okay, quick, funny Claire's story. So we were at the beach for spring break and you know how picky my daughter is, she doesn't eat anything. So we went to this ice cream shop every night to get ice cream and it's the one shop and Blue Mountain Beach. So sometimes the line is like 40 people and sometimes it's not. So we pull up the last night and the line is so long and she's like well, I don't want to wait in this. Well, on the other side they have a soft serve area that didn't have a short line. So I was like, let's just go over there. And she was like okay, and they had something called a concrete, which I believe is similar to like a blizzard, where they put it in the machine and they'd mix the topping in it. So for three nights in a row she'd gotten chocolate ice cream with gummy bears on the other side.

Speaker 2:

So I asked the lady if I tell Claire what a concrete is. Doesn't want it. I asked the lady to tell her. She tells her what the concrete is. Claire thinks about it. Okay, I'll get chocolate and gummy bears. She gets it, she likes it. So we're going to bed that night and I always ask her you know what made you proud today? She says I'm really proud. I tried the concrete and I was like, yeah, Claire, what a stretch. Instead of having gummy bears and chocolate in a cone, you had it in a cup. I'm so proud of you, Claire.

Speaker 1:

You got to take chances in life. You have to take chances in life.

Speaker 2:

She was like really, and she understood what I was laughing about. But to her mind it was different and she tried it. Bless her little soul.

Speaker 1:

I see now, that's funny because I would be so boring, because I am just a fan of soft serve. You know me, I don't have the sweet, I just want a swirl soft serve in a cup.

Speaker 2:

Are you a mess on the cruise ship? Then Do you get them on the cruise ship.

Speaker 1:

I do. One of the most disappointing things about the Disney cruise now and I'm sure I'll be terminated for this is that you no longer they no longer have that the 24-7, 365 open thing there. They have to serve it to you.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, and it's a line. Yes, a COVID thing, yep.

Speaker 1:

Which really annoys me, because I used to just walk by and stick my head under it and turn it on until somebody else showed up to get some Not true folks Not true. I didn't do that, no, but I did like just being able to go and get my own whenever I wanted. Yeah, the line does get pretty long because be really really great.

Speaker 1:

It's safety, all right. Enough talk about food, and now I want a Thanksgiving meal with soft serve, and that's probably not a good idea, though I will be having plenty of turkey today. But, before we get off of this, let me ask you when you do a turkey, when you've done a turkey, do you also do the after-meal soup sort of thing with the turkey? Because I'm going to try it for the first time in the crock pot today.

Speaker 2:

So I don't do anything with the bones I haven't yet. We always eat all the white meat and then usually the dark meat. I'll maybe go in like an enchilada. I still am like I'm a little bit creeped out about the bone thing, so I need to just get over it. I don't like picking the chicken, so last year I think Guy did it and I sent them home with the stuff that had the fat on it and I just kept the breast meat so I gotta it's.

Speaker 1:

I have room to grow John in that area okay, yeah, yeah, I'll let you know how it goes. I'm trying a trying a new recipe, the usual, you know, celery, onion, um, and carrot thing, but I'm also going to try a little bit of cream of mushroom soup in it to give it a little bit of just try to kick it up a notch Figure. It's a free turkey. I might as well try something. Go for it. So I'll let everybody know how that goes and what it's like to eat turkey for 11 straight days.

Speaker 2:

They know, believe me, which is fairly what we're going to.

Speaker 1:

We went to friends for dinner yesterday and had something different. So I we went to Friends for dinner yesterday and had something different. So I felt kind of good that we mixed it up a bit. That's very exciting. All right, let me ask you. You essentially crossed the finish line and sat down here to talk, to have a little chat. How was your run today? Temperatures aren't bad out there. Humidity really kicking up here in Central Florida, right.

Speaker 2:

Today was good and I was going to run at Claire's Gymnastics. But then I don't want to say the stupid lady on the news, the wonderful meteorologist, kept saying it was going to rain in the afternoon, but my app says it's not. And I just knew if I didn't run I would get to Claire's Gymnastics and inevitably it would be pouring and I couldn't run. I had a great run. I did mile repeats. I only did two of them, one was in the 740s and one was in the low eights. But I thought of a story I wanted to tell people and I want you to listen to it. You have to listen.

Speaker 1:

I can't leave the room and you text me when you finally go. Okay, fair enough.

Speaker 2:

So when I was at the Olympic trials, there were two Olympians having a conversation, and I don't want to out the people in the conversation because it's about one of their kids. So that's all I'm going to say about who was in the conversation.

Speaker 1:

Can I make it up? Can I just make it up and say it's 1980 Olympic hockey gold medalist. Jim Cray and Brian Boitano.

Speaker 2:

It's about running though.

Speaker 2:

But okay. So they were talking about how did your kid's race go? And I'm just going to say the guy, because it's too hard for me to tell this completely ambiguously the guy was just like it didn't go well. And then the other person was like do they not know, you know why? And they kind of went back and forth and then the person was like, did they not know how to hurt? And he was like, did they not know how to hurt? And he was like that's it, they don't want to hurt, they don't know how to hurt.

Speaker 2:

And it was so weird to me because I don't think this way as a runner, watching the two Olympians agree that to be successful as an elite runner, you have to not be afraid. And you have to go into a race knowing how much it's going to hurt and sit in that hurt. And I guess I'd never really thought about it that way when I go to run. I guess eventually I'm out of breath and I'm like, oh, I need to slow down. I'm not like, okay, sit in it, stay in it, keep going. I'm like this is bad. Things hurt. Stop. I don't think you're okay, keep going. So it was this like weird realization to me that the people who listen to this are like well, duh, but it's supposed to, not supposed to. But you got to hurt sometimes.

Speaker 1:

Well, yeah, and I think it goes a different way of putting it. When I worked at the ESPN club, I got to interview dozens, if not hundreds, of athletes of all different disciplines and levels of competition. It's embrace the pain. There are a lot of things where they say you just you have to embrace the pain because otherwise, if you just I get it, if you, if, if you embrace it, then it's just part of your overall experience. But if that's all you're focusing on it's, it's difficult to to overcome that.

Speaker 1:

I once actually watched a special on Mind Over Matter for people who are dealing with chronic diseases that were painful, people who were dealing with chronic diseases that were painful and who were literally taught in their mind to be able to contextualize that into the point where the pain itself is just a channel on TV that you can turn off. But the only way you can do that is if you accept that it's just simply part of what you're going through. It's like if you're you know, if you're let's say, I'm doing spring cleaning. Now If you're mopping the house and it's a little too warm and you start sweating, do you stop, turn the air conditioner on, or do you just fight through it.

Speaker 1:

I know that's flippant compared to what you're dealing with when you're doing a run, but it is, if you just accept this is part of my existence and I can live in it and not let it. I can control it and not let it control me. So I think that's kind of a way to say but yeah, embrace the pain.

Speaker 2:

It was interesting that that he was admitting, like my daughter's not that good yet because she hasn't gotten to that point where it's okay, Like she's afraid of the pain.

Speaker 1:

And don't you think that's what makes the difference between people who are elite? You know the commitment that's part of the commitment to being any sort of athlete. The training for any sport requires that you deal with pain and fatigue, and so, yeah, it makes sense to me. But it is kind of funny to have it explained about a kid running. But it wasn't a kid.

Speaker 2:

The person's older, you know, I think she's in high school or whatnot.

Speaker 1:

But then on my run.

Speaker 2:

I took that to heart and I suffered through my mile repaid, so much so that at one point people were walking and they simply got off the trail because they could hear my breathing behind them. I could have gone around them, but they made it seem like I could collapse at any moment, and we need to give this woman all the space possible. So I guess my point to this was that if you're listening and you're thinking about getting ready for a race or a run, don't be scared to get uncomfortable. Don't put yourself in any human danger, but work on getting comfortable, being uncomfortable and maybe see what unlocks in you. You probably aren't going to make the Olympics at this point.

Speaker 1:

No, isn't it sort of like to build up your muscles or to build up your cardiovascular? You have to go through the point where you start at a certain level and as you work through it, your level raises. Your threshold for pain to keep going, I think, gets greater as you just work through the fact that, yeah, you're going to be uncomfortable. These are not comfortable things. I mean, I've joked about it, but running a marathon is not a normal thing to do. There's going to be a level. The reason that it is such an accomplishment is because you have had to fight through all of that. If it were as simple as getting soft serve and you can see, my mind is still there, but you don't even want to wait in line for that.

Speaker 2:

So, yeah, exactly. Well, that's too uncomfortable. I'll mop while sweating, but I will not wait in line for my soft serve.

Speaker 1:

I tell you, go buy a twisty treat over here and if the line, like you know, if I'm, it really depends on how long the line is. But they open another ice cream place across from the Twisty Treat.

Speaker 2:

I can't talk about it. We've got to move on. Maybe another day there's an influx of soft serve here in West Orange County. All right, john, before we get to Brooke, let's thank our sponsors.

Speaker 1:

All right, we want to thank our sponsors. Sarah Akers, with Runs on Magic, is a lover of Run Disney herself. Sarah always loves helping plan those magical Run Disney weekends. But the world is your oyster with Sarah's help. Whether you're looking to book a honeymoon getaway, all-inclusive girls trip, guys weekend, family cruise, international adventures, she is here and at your service.

Speaker 2:

That's right. She offers complimentary travel planning services, personalized itineraries and specializes in Run Disney Universal cruises. Wherever she can't help with the soft serve but she can help you get there. Use the special promo code 321GO when you request your vacation quote. You can be entered to win a $200 Disney gift card or a booking credit. And we want to get you ready for springtime surprise with Fluffy Fizzies. They're the ones who make that amazing glitter lipstick that I always wear, but they also have bath bombs that are good for relaxation, good for recovery. So we've got the link in the show notes. Click that link and use the code Carissa Galloway to save 10%.

Speaker 3:

Okay, civilians, it's time for the goods. Let's get on to the interview.

Speaker 1:

From Pennsylvania to Orlando, this bubbly creator is bringing magic to the Run, Disney Racecourse, the Disney Parks and now the Expo 2. Please welcome to 3, 2, 1, go Bebe Brooke.

Speaker 3:

Hi, Brooke, how are you and I apologize for having to get your intro on the fourth. Take Hi there. Thanks so much for having me. I'm doing great this morning.

Speaker 1:

And now let everybody know where are you.

Speaker 3:

So I'm currently in Windermere Florida.

Speaker 1:

Just down the road, yeah, right down the road. It is cold here today, I know. For those of you who don't live in Florida, that means it's under 70. So it's just frigid it is.

Speaker 2:

When I asked Google the temperature this morning, it said 48. But it didn't feel as humid as sometimes our race morning 48s do. But it's good running weather for those of you in Central Florida getting those last long springtime runs. All right, brooke, looking at everything you do, I was like where do we start? And so I want to start with something that I think had to be the beginning of your journey, and that's just simply a love of Disney. So for you, how did that start? Did you grow up, like most of us, a Disney kid?

Speaker 3:

So a Disney kid, as in. I loved Disney movies and I always loved the Disney stories. Yes, coming to the Disney parks, I only came twice when I was young. I came when I was six and I came when I was nine and that was the year of the cake castle. So those are my only two Disney parks memories.

Speaker 2:

Were you pro or anti-cake castle?

Speaker 3:

Oh, 100% pro cake castle. Absolutely loved it and I could never understand why people didn't like it. And then, in 2021, my husband and I did a vow renewal here at Disney and I could imagine why maybe a bride would not love having a giant pink castle in her back.

Speaker 1:

We should really do. We should do an informal poll on that and find out, because that was a very, very polarizing thing in this community, Because you were John and I don't mean this sarcastically.

Speaker 2:

you were older than Brooke and I were at that time, so we were seeing it.

Speaker 1:

Considerably.

Speaker 2:

We were like yay cake. What was the vibe like for your generation, John?

Speaker 1:

I don't think there was any vibe whatsoever, it was just sort of wow, they made it look like a cake. I just thought it was kind of. I actually thought they did a really, really good job with it. I will admit that after a while it got a little old and I would think if you were somebody who was like a Disney traditionalist that it might be somewhat jarring. But you know, change is difficult for people. But I would say I will say I'm glad that they took it away.

Speaker 1:

Listen, I'm so old, brooke, that the first time that I had any contact with Walt Disney World I was standing in front of a sign, at five years old, that said future site of Walt Disney World, because it was 1969. And then my parents had told me on oh, we're going to go and see where Disney World is going to be. And as a five-year-old you think, hey, I'm going to Disney World. No, it was just a sign. Do you have a picture of this somewhere, somewhere at my mom's? So the next time I go up to my mom's somewhere there is a picture Now on that same trip in fact I hadn't quite turned five, I was four On that same a picture of me at the Kennedy Space Center with the Saturn V on the launch pad that took the first men to the moon.

Speaker 1:

So it was a little bit of a trade-off for me, but my first Disney experience was horribly disappointing because the park didn't exist. So I don't know who to register my complaint to. But we don't have time for that on this podcast. All right, so that's your Disney stuff. Brooke, talk about your athletic journey. Are you somebody that was athletic in high school as a youngster? How did that come about?

Speaker 3:

Well, hold on. I feel like I really I need to back up just a little bit, because I only came to Disney twice when I was young, and then I came back when I was 17. And that was when I was like I want to make this my whole life. I don't know what happened when I came back as a 17 year old. I came back with my dance studio, because I used to dance like my whole life and I walked into the parks and there was just something about it.

Speaker 3:

And then the next time I came I think it was when I came with my husband he was my boyfriend at the time and we rode pirates together and he was like that's it. And I was like that's it. I was like um. I was like if you, I I pretty much said to him I was like um, if you and disney don't work, I don't know if you and I are gonna work. And he actually, like the month later he bought into dvc. He was like I think this is going to be something big for her and I kind of like her. And he said he knew at the time he was going to ask me to marry him. So he was like I better get the Disney stuff in line.

Speaker 1:

You have to have those rules.

Speaker 3:

You have to have those rules for the person you're going to spend your life with.

Speaker 1:

There are a few make or break rules. That seems fair. You just keep clashing.

Speaker 2:

That seems fair. You just keep clashing Like. My ex-husband was very anti-Disney and Weston grew up in it. It's just, it's more symbiotic, right, like they get it. They go to the park, they buy in, we're not. We're not rope drop to close people. We're like four to five hours, enjoy a few things. There's definitely a level of enjoyment which is necessary.

Speaker 3:

And there's a lot. It's like a classic. The leg. He said exactly. He said he remembered it as a kid being a lot like a bigger deal, and so when he wrote it, he just was like, oh. And I was like, wait a minute, this is a classic, uh.

Speaker 3:

So anyway, we got all the disney stuff worked out. And athletic wise, I mean, I played soccer up until my junior year of high school. I actually this, I think, is very funny I was a goalie and I was a goalie from kindergarten until I was a junior in high school. And I'm only, I'm barely five two, so I could just tip the crossbar and I just knew I did not have a future as a goalie and I wanted to keep dancing. So I danced a lot and actually when I was really little, my dream was to be a football player. Like in second grade we had to make career bears and mine was. I made mine an NFL football player. I was like I'm going to be a football player. Little Giants was my favorite movie. I was just so into it. And, yeah, I've always been a big sports fan, but I never was a runner. I think that's why I liked being a goalie is because you just pretty much stood there almost the whole time.

Speaker 1:

Me too, and you must've been good, because normally they just that's the place where you start soccer and who's the tallest? All right, get in goal, yeah, exactly.

Speaker 3:

I had no fear really. I just I kind of went for it. But I think, going into seeing in high school how much bigger everybody got and I just kept staying the same size, I was like I could get really hurt back here. So, yeah, it wasn't until I actually I was unemployed right after we got married. I had a job and then I got laid off and then I got another job, was there for a year and I just told this story to someone last night. I bought my first car because my grandparents so graciously bought me my very first car. So I never had a car payment. Was that my job for a year? So that Saturday bought a car and on Monday I got laid off and I was like, oh my gosh, now I have this car payment and I have no job and my husband and I were only married for like six months and I was unemployed for a year and a half.

Speaker 3:

After that, a million interviews and then, of course, you know, couldn't go to Disney, all that. So I was watching a lot of YouTube and I saw someone run the princess half marathon on a YouTube video in 2012. And I looked at my husband and I said I'm going to do that next year. And he was like what? I was like I'm going to run the princess half next year. And not only did I do that year, and uh, he was like what? I was like I'm gonna run the princess half next year. And not only did I do that, I ran the very first uh, at the time it was the glass slipper challenge and um, so now I have. That was my very first race in 2014 and I've done every princess, all the princess challenges since, um, but it's not, I would say, until like the last four years, that I actually I didn't know I could be fast.

Speaker 3:

I haven't ever like. I was a solid, like 10 to 12 minute mile runner, and sometimes even, you know, a little faster, a little slower than that, and I was totally fine with that. I was just enjoying the ride and in 2020, kind of made some life changes and hopped on the Peloton that I had sitting in our house for a year. It was just sitting there. I think I got on it one time and then I finally got on it and I rode consistently like, especially when, like you know, pandemic times hit, I was like well, but especially when, like you know, pandemic times hit. I was like, well, there's nowhere else to go, I'm going to get on this bike. And the first time that I ran again was actually when my husband and I came back to the parks in July. We were staying at a resort and the parks weren't open yet and I was like, well, they don't have like a bike here, they just had, like you know, one in the gym. I was like, let's go out and run. And we ran for two miles. And I ran two miles and ate 40 pace and I was like, oh my gosh. I was like I didn't know I could do this. And so the cycling really helped my running.

Speaker 3:

And, yeah, in the past couple years in 2022, I placed first in my division for the 10K at Wine and Dine and I have some goals, like maybe qualifying for Boston someday and all of that. But it's kind of I don't know. It's interesting. I love that I've gotten to be at like every part of the race course.

Speaker 3:

Like my first half marathon, I know I really wanted to run a sub three and I ran like a two 5930. And I was like, yeah, I did it. And then, you know, I've had slower races than that and faster, but running definitely came to me later in life and I want to. I think, carissa, you posted some I forget which race it was recently and you posted a picture with this woman who was crossing the finish line and it was her 80th birthday and I was like that's what I want to do. So I feel like right now, while I have like time goals and all that, it kind of became a little more secondary, like I'm like I want to do whatever I have to to to do this and be crossing finish lines when I'm 80, because there's just so much joy in it and we only get one body. So I'm like I want to move it as long as I can and well, that's awesome.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, she was there, princess, I think, yeah, it was princess. I took a picture and I was like, hold on, come over here, lady. But I want to shout out you, because that's an amazing progression and I think anybody listening like you can translate that cycling speed or that time spent on Peloton. But if anybody follows you on Peloton like I do, john Brooke puts up numbers and I'm like, yeah, no, I'm good, I can't catch you. I have tried, she is so strong. But I actually want to jump back to your first Disney race pre-race, because something that always boggles John and I's mind is registering for these races. So, like you know, you find out about Princess and it's in a month where you can't get into Princess. So what was yours like? How did you find out? You know? Did you put it in the calendar? Was registration easy?

Speaker 3:

So I did put it in the calendar because the timing that I said I'm going to do that next year was actually still early 2013. And that was actually how I ended up getting a job was that I put on the calendar that I was going to sign up for this princess half and I knew I was going to sign up for it. So I started running and I was like I don't even know where to start and I'll never forget my first three mile run. I went out and like mile and a half, I was like I feel great the whole mile and a half walk. I had to walk back because I was like, oh my gosh, I'm a side sticker, I have no idea what I'm doing.

Speaker 3:

And I actually got a job with Runners World and I started working with them for marketing their training products and it was just this perfect balance. I was like, hey, I'm your perfect customer. I just started running. I didn't even know where to find your training products. And I started working with them in 2013. And they actually brought me to do my first dopey in 2015. And so now next year will be my 11th, so I missed the first dopey, but, yeah, that was how I got my like my job, and so I had it on the calendar. The first registration was nothing like it is now. I just like opened the computer I probably not at 10am, just went on. That day I signed up for the glass slpper Challenge and I think the first couple of years were kind of like that, like it really wasn't, like it is now. I don't think I ever waited.

Speaker 1:

Like the Lord of the Flies. It's like Lord of the Flies. Now. It's just, it's my goodness, following it online. I didn't think I could speak for Carissa and Riley. We start texting each other. It's like, oh my goodness, what these folks go through just to just to register I know I'm like just to get a banana.

Speaker 3:

I always love that, that meme. That's like you went all this way just for a banana. Uh, yeah, it's like we're we're paying and we're spending all this time and stress on the computer and I mean, I guess the only good part about it is we're not alone. Like there's 1000s of us sitting with every device we own, like whipping out the old iPad just to try to like have another browser open. But yeah, it's, it's crazy now and I, I usually. So the really nice thing is that I'm perfect with the princess challenge and with the two course challenge. So for those I get an extra week to register. Like that's your little gift for being perfect is you get an email that's like, hey, you can register a week early. So that takes some pressure off, which is really nice. But for the rest of them, it's like, yeah, you're just made the odds to be ever in your favor and you just go for it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I had somebody tell me to race once that they were going to trade in their old laptop to get a new laptop, but then they remembered that, wait, if I hold on to this, my registration is going to be earlier. So they paid the extra $500 or whatever for the new laptop and didn't trade theirs in because of that. So, yeah, oh my gosh.

Speaker 1:

I know when we say in the morning to people and anybody who's listening, when we say we know all the hoops you jumped through, we're not just talking about you know 1 am that morning when you rolled out of bed, we really, really appreciate it. So that leads me to this question, Brooke the changes in the races themselves over the last 10 to 11 years. Someone else do the math. I was an English major. Since you started, what are the changes in the races and also the athletes, Because the demographic has changed, at least from what we see, over the last 10 or 11 years? A great deal really.

Speaker 3:

I feel like one of the biggest changes for me has been because of how I've changed as an athlete. I have enjoyed the races more, I think, for what they are like, what Disney wants you to enjoy them for, like I now stop for characters and stuff. Since I start in Corral A, I have and I have time to stop for characters. It was so cold during princess though I don't know I think it got colder as the race went on that poor pocahontas, like mile nine, I just ran by her. I was like girl, I cannot stop for you. She had no one in line and it was. It was just so cold but um, but I think for me I've enjoyed it more for the extra magic that is a Disney race.

Speaker 3:

I have never gotten on an attraction during a race. I have always had this mental block about stopping for so long and getting on an attraction and so people that do more power to them. I definitely have seen the amount of costumes and just like the creativity of costumes over the years has completely changed my very first princess outfit. This is so ridiculous, but it was just a skirt that had scales on it and a white tank top with seashells painted on it scales on it and a white tank top with seashells painted on it, and I made a little headband that had a starfish with a tiny little dinglehopper on it and I wore that my first time and I am extremely superstitious, like I get routines down and I just have to do them again. I wore that every princess half for 10 years. So last year was my first time at the Expo during princess and everyone was asking me if I was going to wear that outfit again because I posted on social media. I have a picture in the same spot every year wearing that costume, even in 2021, when there was no race. My husband and I were down here and I ran loops in the Hollywood Studios parking lot and then I went to Magic Kingdom to take a picture in that spot. They were like what are you gonna do with that costume? I was like I have to retire it. I was like the elastic is no longer elasticking. This tank top is so sad, but I feel like that was a lot more. It was just a lot more like inspired stuff and there wasn't like I don't know.

Speaker 3:

I started Run Disney before I was on social media and I just feel like there's a lot more social media presence surrounding it. There's a lot more just it kind of you know. It makes sense why registration is so crazy now because there wasn't such a fanfare around it. I think the races in general general have always been so fun. I have experienced the gamut like running for the past 11 years. I was at the Splash and Dash in I think that was 2014 where it was like torrential downpour at night during Wine and Dine, and then the next year when it was like the half of a half and so to like to canceled races and then to another half of a half this year and so to like to canceled races and then to another half of a half this year, and I think that's you know, kind of the beauty of it is you have to just roll with the punches. And I think I've only ever run I don't want to say just a handful of races outside of Run Disney, but I just ran my 100th Run Disney race in January. So I've done a lot more Disney races than anything else, but I just am always so fascinated and inspired by the pool of runners because really it's every age, it is every ability, everything which is just so cool.

Speaker 3:

And in the last few years. I forget what was the first year I did it. I think maybe it was 2019. When I finished my princess half, I actually went back into Epcot to cheer on runners which at the time, I was only there for maybe an hour. And now every race weekend the last race weekend, the last race weekend, like the last race except for marathon, because I'm usually dead after a dopey I cheer until the last runner and it is the like the best experience ever.

Speaker 3:

I have so much fun and I am probably the most annoying fan out there because I bring a cowbell and I if, until I get to the fence, I literally will ring that cowbell in people's ears, because some people just stand along the fence on their phones. I know and I'm like, do you know how hard this is? Like, do you know how hard they are working out there? And so, yeah, I don't. When people turn around and they look at my cowbell, I'm like, oh yeah, I'm like I will, I'm not stopping. Well, good for you, I'm not stopping, but it is just the coolest thing, because I know how many things I've been going through when I've crossed the finish line.

Speaker 3:

So just seeing thousands of people accomplish. That is just incredible and that over the years just never, ever gets old. And I think especially post-COVID sometimes we need that serotonin boost. So I never walk away from a finish line like having a bad time. I'm always like that was so incredible. I love seeing the last runner. I love like you see people cry, you see people holding hands, you see people you know that at some point look like they got injured, maybe on the course and still pushing through. So I get a little bit of the joy that you guys get when you're at the finish line, because it is pretty, it's pretty awesome. I was so embarrassed this was it was last year, one of the races I don't remember, but I finished the 10k and I came back around to watch my husband finish and I was standing by one of the the timing things and my name kept coming up over you took my, you took my comment away from me, bro, please, we really appreciate you, but take your timing chip, oh I, I always do that.

Speaker 3:

now, don't worry. I didn't know what was happening and since it was a 10k, it was a like I didn't want to lose my bib. So I was like, oh, I'll just keep it on, he's going to be done soon. And then I was like, oh my gosh, my name keeps coming up over the like you.

Speaker 1:

I was so embarrassed, so, yes, I usually recognize like the third or fourth time I've said someone's name. But with all of us, particularly marathon weekend, we're switching out and stuff. Yeah, I think some people get called out. Somebody's like you've never said my name and someone else says mine was said 37 times, just for the 10K.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yep, that happened to me last year, so now I know, I make sure.

Speaker 2:

I stay away from those things and have my bib very far away. Good, good tip, All right, I have three follows up and have my bib very far away. Good, good tip, All right, I have three follows up, follows up, follows ups, if I can remember them all. One I'm glad we're not crazy when we're like costumes didn't used to be like this, because I do feel like we like are like this is and it's great it just it has evolved, like you said, from like simple bounding which all kind of started at Princess, started at Princess. My second thing is, John, and I apologize because when you are so fast, you finish in the BJC time, meaning we're not there, we're still sitting. If it's a 10K, you are done and you are probably to your car and we're still there.

Speaker 1:

So I never see you really.

Speaker 2:

Like maybe there's a chance for a marathon. And I had a third thing, but I feel like I don't remember what it was, but you've just really become such a great part of Run Disney and I think everything you said embodies why Run Disney is beautiful Because you're getting a love of Disney, you're getting great entertainment, but you're also getting to see people's own personal transformative journeys and what it means to people. So we're so glad that you're a part of the Run Disney family. And I want to shift gears a little bit to talk about BB Brooks. So I remember kind of starting to follow you during the pandemic. I think you were. I think I was just hungry for Disney stuff and I was like who's at Disney? Who can I follow to see that they're at Disney? But how did BB Brooks start?

Speaker 3:

So I started BB Brooks it will be 10 years in May. So it was just about a year after I started BB Brook it will be 10 years in May. So it was just about a year after I started working at Runner's World and I we got to go back to Disney and I said to my husband I was like I need more ears, like the parks do not have enough ears. And I so I just started making them myself and was like you wanted them to match more outfits. And at the time, social media was way different than it is now. Like for me. People just found me, they, they liked what I was doing and so I just I kept doing it and I grew pretty quickly back then, which was I I can't believe it's almost been a decade Like I'm like, what am I doing? But I've been, you know, building my business and all that. So I actually left runners world in 2015. And I said to them I was like, if you still want me to come to Disney with you and run dopey, I will do that. And they actually brought me back a couple for the next couple years because they were like you get the Disney and we get the runners, so it's a good match. But I, yeah, I just kept, I kept going, I kept growing and doing fun things enough to the point where I finally got the chance.

Speaker 3:

I started working with Disney in 2019, which I can't believe was almost five years ago now, but I knew, as was growing, I really wanted to formulate a partnership with them and get to expand on what I can design and what I can create. And that expanded last year into me having a booth at the expos, which was a dream of mine since starting my business, because I used to love to just wander around the expo and find booths and check out what everybody's making, and I was like, wow, wouldn't this be so cool if I could have my stuff here? Because these are my people, the run Disney people, the Disney people and I tried and tried for years and then finally, last year, I got a booth and I have now done every race weekend since Last Princess and including Dopey to Disneyland, which, yeah, it was a lot. It was a lot especially because I ran, that's. The other thing is I run all the races and I'm working all the days, which has made my run Disney experience a little different. You're like us now.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

But we don't run. But it's a different level of I mean that Disney World to Disneyland. While I thrilled for it love, it was the greatest thing ever it took me a solid three plus weeks to get back to normal in terms of I'm sure you have back end stuff you have to do, like other parts of life. It was like you were in this amazingly fun bubble, but it was tiring.

Speaker 3:

It was so tiring. We had two park days planned for, after everything was done, on Sunday, and the day before we left, monday I think, we went into the parks, we did a loop and then we went back and went back to sleep and then, tuesday, I finally took a picture of my medal in front of the castle. I was like, ok, check, did that. And then before our flight we sat in front of the fireplace inside the Grand Californian for three hours and I was like I'm so sad we didn't do the parks, but I just couldn't. I was like every last ounce of me was out on the race courses, it was on the expo floor. It was just so much like time change. And you know, we had to get product. We flew with all of my product in six suitcases with us and then we shipped fixtures out and it just was all the coordination. I think my brain was absolutely fried and and then it was also very cold there which I was.

Speaker 3:

I was not expecting that for for the runs and I did not get into Dumbo, speaking of registration issues, that registration registration was bananas and I it was a magical moment for me I was able to get signed up for the 10K during the weekend because then that made the half my hundredth race and I did not have an outfit at all and I ordered something on shipped from Target and shopper was like they don't have the shirt that you want and your size and I was like, please, I just need a long sleeve shirt. It's going to be 40 degrees and I'm running a race and the the shopper sent me pictures of like all the shirts that were available. I gave him a very big tip. I was like thank you so much, because I'm working at the expo right now and I just need a shirt. I already have a skirt. But yeah, it was, it was cold. I think that takes it out of you too, just like a lot of sun, a lot of cold takes it out of you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm not not being invited.

Speaker 2:

John, wait, I have to talk about Disneyland. It's just one second.

Speaker 1:

Well, no, no, I was just going to say not not being invited to Disneyland. I kind of looked when I saw how cold it was. I'm going to admit it right there, I'm a bad person. But I thought because all I hear is, oh, Southern California has the best weather in the world. And then it was like, eh, be careful what you think, Be careful what you wish for.

Speaker 2:

But that fireplace in Grand Californian. That's my favorite Disney hotel. I mean, I like Mira Costa in Tokyo, but that fireplace and those rocking, they're very coveted seats and it's just the most peaceful Like. I just love sitting there. It makes me so very happy and if the piano is playing it's just beautiful, so good.

Speaker 3:

All right, I do not regret it for a second.

Speaker 1:

I'm going to give everybody a little bit of inside baseball. And when we do our podcast because people seem to like this as we constantly go because, brooke, you're a great interview, by the way, because you jumped through we have questions that you answer in the other question, which is absolutely fabulous. You, obviously, you have a marketing background, obviously, because you know what you're doing. So we're constantly typing in and Carissa used to type follow up when it was a follow up, but now I'll just look down and I'll see my initial and then F you and I have to admit that it takes me a minute from time to time because I'm like what did I do wrong? I'm just sitting here, I'm trying I know I talked over you, but I had something to say, so now I get. She means follow-up, because really, brooke, it could go either way just to let you know behind the scenes.

Speaker 2:

I'm sorry, I didn't realize. I think that's like a dietician shorthand when we're with a patient.

Speaker 1:

I just look down, I go F you Well, f you too. I didn't do anything, I'm just trying to ask questions. Brooke's interesting, all right. Well, let's, let's jump, let's jump into the expo, cause that's interesting and we, we don't get to go over there anymore. We used to rehearse in that space and now we rehearse yes, f, you don't come here anymore. So what, what is that experience like with all of the runners? And really, what is? What is, uh, what's the favorite? Seems to be the favorite product of yours, at least currently. And listen, if you got something, you got extra in the warehouse, go ahead and uh, talk about it right now. We'll, we'll, we'll, we'll make the daily special for uh for springtime surprise.

Speaker 3:

So it is an experience like no other. I just have to. I had no idea what to expect going into it my first time and now feeling like I kind of have a handle on it. I still don't, because every race weekend is different and I'm sure you can see that just kind of from the pool of runners out there. The shoppers are also different, like what they're looking for, what they want, at a race weekend, and so I feel like I've been playing a little bit of a game each weekend to be like okay, like what kind of things do runners at this weekend really gravitate towards? What are some things that other race weekends like just didn't work out?

Speaker 3:

I'm sure you can imagine that, princess, shoppers are the shoppers like they it's, it's, you know, girls weekends and just lots of fun and coming to just hang out at the expo, and so people are spending a lot more time and, of course, you know, hopefully spending more money. But I, this princess, like I had tiaras and fun little things. Those were like the first to go and I was like, oh my gosh, I was just testing that out, see how it would work. And then marathon weekend it's a lot more people looking definitely for things to use on their run. So I sell athletic headbands with, like Vicky or I have villains and stuff like that and those have definitely been an expo favorite. So I'm working on more, more designs of those. You know, bib boards, stuff that like to hold your bib on all that kind of stuff. Marathon weekend was like you know, that's what people wanted, they weren't into extra frills and it also was a lot more chill crowd like athletes that are just there to go get their shirts and not so much walk around and peruse the expo, where, like wine and dine in springtime are a little more chill vibes, just kind of does not feel as crazy.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, my booth now. I think this will be the third weekend in a row that I'm like right down from the stairs. So it's like really nice because people walk. They definitely have to walk past you, but you have a lot of people who want to beeline to their shirts. So then you're just like people are running past you and you're like, oh man, like yeah, come back.

Speaker 3:

And I always have this like weird fear. The first like 15 minutes that it opens. I'm like nobody likes me, no one's gonna buy everything, anything. This is gonna be awful and then, as the day goes like, it ends up being okay and I actually, for most of the expos I have gotten just the chance to meet and chat with people, which has been amazing. My husband and some friends have helped run the booth because I have found out I'm a terrible salesperson when it comes to my own stuff. I used to work at Lululemon and I could sell pants like crazy Whatever you need, I got you. But when it comes to my stuff, even people in the parks are like oh my gosh, I love your ears and I'm like thank you, and I just walk away. I'm so bad.

Speaker 2:

She could be in our club, John we're both terrible self promoters too.

Speaker 3:

Like we need a club, we need, like, a support system. We're not good at it, it's, it's. Yeah. If I'm, if I'm with a friend, they're like they're on her website, like, here is her Instagram. Like, check her out. But when it's just me, I'm like, thanks, goodbye. Like I'm so bad at it, you're us.

Speaker 1:

I feel you.

Speaker 3:

It's just, it's awkward, no, and I feel you about the booze thing.

Speaker 2:

I don't even like to throw parties because I feel like people won't show up, so like I would totally be the same way. Yes, and John, and I always think nobody likes us, so that's just our general demeanor.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and it starts, and then people start like coming down the stairs and you're like, please, please, please. And it just feels like, yeah, you're like, please, come to my birthday party. Like yeah, you just feel awkward, like I want people to come and stop. And then, once people start mingling, you're like, ok, this isn't so bad, I can do this and I have just gotten the chance. Being on social media for me is so weird because I grew up without social media. Media for me is so weird because I grew up without social media, like I, you know, I didn't have Instagram until like 2012 and I grew up with AOL and dial up and all that.

Speaker 2:

So like we're that generation that like laps both of them which I will go to my grave saying I'm so glad I didn't have social media in high school or college that made it so much easier.

Speaker 3:

I couldn't even imagine as an adult it is. As an adult. It is hard, so I can't even imagine growing up with it. I have a 15-year-old nephew and an almost 12-year-old niece and I'm like man, if I was doing this social media stuff like they are now, I don't know how I could handle it and it's so weird and I've loved sharing my journey. I've loved that it's given me a platform for my business and all that.

Speaker 3:

But my favorite part about the expo is that I actually get to connect with people that have found me through social media and I've just gotten to hear so many people's running journeys and why they start and why they're here and how many you know what they're coming back from or that, to me, is just so amazing. I I leave every day like my emotional battery is completely drained because I feel like I've been through like the gamut of hearing people's happy stories and hearing people's comeback stories and I, you know, trying to absorb all that. I'm like, wow, run Disney is such a big deal to people and I think that is the coolest part about the expos to me is that I just get to chat with people who are like me and are passionate about Disney and running, and that's been the coolest part, and so I hope I always say I'm like one day maybe my people won't want to come and meet me, so I keep soaking it up while they do?

Speaker 2:

They will and springtime is coming so hopefully, as everybody listens to this, they can go check you out online and head over and visit you at the expo. One thing I want to touch on is something that hopefully this is an okay question to ask you, something that I really like. I like when you talk about because kind of how we talked about the pressures of social media, you've talked about sort of mental health and struggles that you've gone through. You've been really open about that and I think that that's really beautiful and I think we all do go through that.

Speaker 3:

So what has helped you through that journey? Definitely, running has helped with mental health. It gives me an outlet, which is just. I think we absolutely all need that. But I think one of the most important things that I did for myself was open up to a social media audience and let them know like, hey, I'm not okay. I think a lot of people look at social media and what you put out there or even like, even with me running, they're like, oh my gosh, like you're so fast and I'm like, so much work went into that and just like I can post a picture of me smiling. I wish you could, you know, you could see what is behind that. And so I think one of the best things for me was actually talking about it and letting people know like, hey, you can look at all these things, like this somewhat magical life that I seem to be living and all these runs I can you know complete and all that. And I still am.

Speaker 3:

I'm just not all right, and I, you know, I've been in therapy. I started medication which was extremely scary for me, and talking about that one made me realize that I wasn't alone, because there's so many other people out there who are going through it. And two, I mean I got a ton of messages about it, but even just if I could have helped one person, like I had one person tell me like seeing you say this stuff made me feel like it was okay to go to therapy. Like you know, when you see your people that you idolize, or that you feel like it was okay to go to therapy. Like you know, when you see your people that you idolize or that you feel like mentors to you and see that maybe they look like they have it all together and then they share like hey, even though this looks pretty good, this is still going on with me. It makes you feel like oh, we're, we're all humans and it kind of just levels that playing field and I think, through all of us going through the pandemic at the same time, we were experiencing so much that really kind of came out unresolved.

Speaker 3:

And I it's it's kind of weird sometimes talking about it, because it's one of those things that I think I grew up with was kind of taboo, like you didn't really talk about it as much, and so talking about it has made it feel a little less daunting to deal with every day too, and things have been a little like they've been getting there and it's just tough when you go through even bigger things in your life, like loss, which last year was a tough one for me.

Speaker 3:

You have big things happen and you're still dealing with this on the daily and I think it's just a reminder. You just never know anyone's journey and what they're going through and and it's okay to not to not be okay, but to just realize you have support and that I think was one of the things too with opening up about it was seeing like opening up about it was seeing like everyone is was really just kind and supportive and realizing like, hey, we're all in this together and I think it's one of the when we talked about the, the, the changes that we've seen over the years, and I got a shout out and give credit to riley claremont who once again will just hold this over me that I gave him gave him credit for something.

Speaker 1:

But, uh, you know, as the, as the guy who did the interviews in the audience, in the crowd, excuse me, for a long time it was, you know, hyping people up. You know, hey, how about your costume? And Riley said let's get to the stories of these people who are here, because everybody has a story and more and more people are opening up about the challenges that got them there. So I certainly appreciate again to echo what Carissa said that you're willing to do that and you've kind of answered this. But if you had one piece of advice for somebody who might be struggling out there with mental health issues, what is opening up about it and talking about it, something that you think is and everyone's journey is their own, clearly, but I know, and a lot of us, you know, I've been in therapy, we've dealt with those things it really does help to know that you aren't alone and you can really really feel alone when you're struggling like that.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely. I think one of the things that I've learned that has helped me the most is it's okay to ask for help, and I think that applies to so many aspects of our lives. You know, I used to be a terrible delegator. I used to just never ask for help, and it was that point, when I realized that I really needed it, that I was like, okay, maybe if I just ask, there's going to be someone willing to help me and I. You know, that was a game changer for me because it made it easier to talk about it. It made me realize like, oh wow, like my friends don't think that I'm weird, like they actually want to be there for me. They want to know what can I do for you, like how can I be there for you? And even with my husband, tommy is great. If you ever come to the expos, he's the one who's doing all the selling, because he's just he's really good at it.

Speaker 3:

He's my biggest supporter. He is at every finish line and I love that now I'm faster than him, because if we run a race together then I can like loop around and be at the finish line for him. And he'll hate me for saying that, but he knows it's true, because when I started running he was way faster than me and now he's always like oh well, I guess now you're faster, so I love that. I get to be his cheerleader too.

Speaker 3:

And even with him he has said to me like okay, like what can I do? Because when you don't understand what someone's going through, I guess the best thing to do for them too is just say, like okay, how can I help? Because sometimes it's just like can you listen to me, can you be there? If I need to call you, can I text you? Like sometimes it's nothing big and I think that we think you have to fix someone to be able to be there for them. And that's not true, you know it's. You just sometimes need someone who understands you, who has been through like the fun stuff with you Also.

Speaker 1:

That is like, oh, wow, like okay, let's go through this hard stuff and realize like we're, we're still there for each other in hard times too, because I think I always say conversation is underrated as a mental health thing and we don't often and thank you for saying listening to, because that that's a hard and you know, a girl I dated in college long ago said hey, sometimes when I tell you I'm thirsty, I don't want you to bring me a glass of water, I want you to say I know what it's like to be thirsty. So that was actually a really good lesson about how listening is sometimes more important than trying to fix someone.

Speaker 2:

So that's good. That was a metaphor, though what's that? That was a metaphor for bigger things, because if she's thirsty, you could have just listened and brought her water. If she's thirsty, you could have just listened and brought her water.

Speaker 1:

I always brought the glass of water and then I was shouted down and then I was shunned to push away. All right, brooke, getting towards the end of this here, so now we're going to hit you with some rapid fire questions. So I know I hate when they do this to me.

Speaker 2:

I overthink everything, don't overthink it.

Speaker 1:

First thing that comes to your head, first thing that comes to your head.

Speaker 3:

First thing that comes to your head what is the coolest Disney experience you've ever been part of? The coolest has been I got invited to go on the DVC member cruise to Alaska in 2022. You were there, I was there, yes, and that was just. I mean, the trip to Alaska was fantastic, the ship was amazing and I've been invited to a few Disney things over the years, like events and stuff, but when I got that email, my jaw was literally on the floor. I was like I'm going to Alaska and Tommy and I had the best time ever.

Speaker 1:

Such a great cruise.

Speaker 3:

So cool.

Speaker 2:

Okay, Well, I have questions for you about that. Later I'll Instagram you because we're going in May.

Speaker 3:

So I have questions about that. Oh, my oh, I'm so excited for you.

Speaker 2:

What is your?

Speaker 3:

favorite Disney park Magic Kingdom.

Speaker 1:

Favorite.

Speaker 3:

Disney ride the People Mover.

Speaker 1:

Shout out to the People Mover, mover never gets any love favorite thing to eat at disney?

Speaker 2:

do you have a favorite snack, favorite meal, favorite restaurant?

Speaker 3:

I think my favorite restaurant is california grill. But I'm putting a a uh caveat on that because since the 50th they changed to a prefix menu. So now I only like to go if I can sit at the bar, because there you can order off of their appetizer menu and if you go with someone you can split the prefix. I'm so bad at eating like appetizer entree dessert and it just gets like really expensive. So California grill, but only if I'm sitting at the bar, because then you can make your own thing and usually you can see fireworks. It's great.

Speaker 1:

And I tell you a lot of run Disney people at the bar at California Grill on any given weekend, because I have been there. That is impactful People always. It's all like run Disney people there. So that's apparently the meeting point folks. If you're new to it, all right.

Speaker 3:

The meeting point folks. If you're new to it, all right. Favorite disney villain apparently during a red disney weekend not that we go out, but I hear I get a lot of pictures from bars. Yeah, favorite disney villain ursula, but I also. She scares. She scares me so bad, but that she's my favorite, were you?

Speaker 1:

there for our first race back after, uh, covid, there was an ursula there that was uh, I'm not sure scary would be the word, just just awkward. Actually, she was awkward actually it was very awkward, awkward and bizarre.

Speaker 3:

I was there and actually that was the reason I started running 5Ks, because I only ever ran them as part of Dopey with Disney. Remember you used to give out the plastic medals, yep, so I never won one of those. But then, when Run Disney came back, I was like I have to do the first race back, so now I do all the 5Ks too.

Speaker 2:

And Ursula went up and down the parking lot very strangely. We were supposed to talk about it, but we weren't supposed to talk about it, but we had to keep talking about it and it just went on and on and on.

Speaker 1:

Thank you, Matthew Hamill.

Speaker 2:

She was about 200 yards away from everyone at that time too, so it was surrounded by a cadre of people.

Speaker 1:

It was very odd, very odd.

Speaker 2:

It was very odd, very odd, it was very odd. So we always joke goes oh, here she goes. Yeah, if you know, you know, if not, you're very confused by this. All right, we're almost done with rapid fire.

Speaker 3:

Uh, your favorite disney running buddy my favorite disney running buddy, I think are my um, my two friends, uh, min and mckenna. Um, min found me in the corrals last I think it was Wine and Dine 2022 and she was like we're gonna be friends and just put her number in my phone and I was like okay, again, like I'm super awkward, and yeah, we like do all of our costumes and stuff together. And McKenna I met through Run Disney, like we met at an expo in 2019. And we kind of all went through transformative running journeys. So we have pretty similar speeds and we've done some fun costumes. That's something I just started doing more recently. Is is making costumes and that are more themed.

Speaker 3:

So, yeah, mckenna and Min are my buddies and we've had some. We've had some fun. And Min are my buddies and we've had some. We've had some fun, some fun races and interesting experiences. But I actually ran, uh, with McKenna. It was her first marathon during Dopey and that was like it was the coolest thing ever to run with somebody during their first marathon. Um, and I'm, I was, I was really honored. She asked me to run with her cause I, how cool like to do get to experience something like that with someone. I, how cool like to do, get to experience something like that with someone.

Speaker 2:

I love that. That's always a story. Who's here alone? Okay, well, find somebody, because these are, these are your people. All right, last rapid fire before we get to our final questions. This is this is kind of for me. I know you love Peloton. You're amazing on there. Like I said, do you have a favorite Peloton instructor?

Speaker 3:

I do. On the bike it's Cody and running. I have more than one, but that I have taken in-person class with and have interacted with is Matty. He's just, he's so great.

Speaker 2:

Majakamo, is that how you say it? Matty Majakamo? Yeah, matty Majakamo, I love his run. Yes, I really like that. So good yeah, I don't have a tread, but I do the outdoor ones and I like him a lot, I do um, the indoor runs out outside too, because they track, so there you have a lot more uh content than if you didn't know. It bugs me, though, because I live in florida, so it's like put that incline up and I'm like, oh yeah, I'm always like just get a little faster I don't know, I just I just, I just make it up, but yeah, yeah, I love those.

Speaker 3:

Well, we're huge Cody fans.

Speaker 2:

I have emailed Cody and messaged him, trying to get him on the show, but no success yet, oh my gosh, we'll keep trying for Boo, for my.

Speaker 3:

Boo. We need to try to get both of them to do a Run Disney race, because I think they would.

Speaker 2:

He has the tattoo and everything Like. I know they would love it.

Speaker 3:

And Maddie loves Run Disney, Like I know they would love it. And Maddie loves run Disney, you know, I mean he loves Disney.

Speaker 2:

And he loves running. We'll just keep putting it out there, and maybe Cody Maddie, where are you, john's? Like we're speaking another language to John currently.

Speaker 1:

Closest I've ever come to the whole Peloton thing is I was walking through New York and I saw the Peloton, you know the storefront thing, and I stood and watched people exercise while eating a hot dog from the streets of New York and, frankly, it's a great experience. So all my Peloton stuff very, very positive I have one more thing to say.

Speaker 2:

And then we're going to move on because we have to, for time. Peloton live classes now are similar to run Disney, apparently, and how hard they are to get into. But I went years ago to see it was a Hannah class. It was like the only one that had space and we probably signed up like four days before. So I have been in the studio back in the day, but my girlfriend wants to go for like her 1,000th ride and she's very stressed by it because apparently it's like you got to get on on a special day right away and I don't have. I ain't got time for that.

Speaker 3:

It's wild. It's like you have to be on the computer for like an hour refreshing six weeks ahead of when you want to do your class. Six weeks ahead of when you want to do your class. Yeah, it's a game.

Speaker 2:

It's like run.

Speaker 1:

Disney. Everything's getting that way Used to be. You'd go, you know I'm so old. I remember going. You go to Disney and you just wander around and decide to get on an attraction or something and now you can't do that. As I said, a lot of Lord of the Flies like experiences out there where you're lucky to survive. All right, let's jump down to the questions we ask everybody at the end. Brooke, thank you so much for spending some time with us. When you get to a hard place in a run or a workout where everybody, no matter the level, gets there, how do you motivate yourself?

Speaker 3:

During a race. I always have a mantra, and that's one of my biggest pieces of advice to new runners too, who are nervous, is to have a mantra, and mine is head, legs, heart, and I learned it at my very first princess expo. Remember when they used to do talks and stuff at the expos. They would have people up there.

Speaker 3:

I listened to someone talk about how they break down their race doing the first five miles, and they give all the responsibility to their head, the second five to their legs. Doing the first five miles and they give all the responsibility to their head, the second five to their legs and then the last three to their heart, and it kind of gives me the ability to transfer the responsibility and the difficulty to different parts of my body. So I always have a mantra. When I ran Berlin which it was just was not my day my mantra was I can do this. I am doing this because I did not think I could. So having a mantra when things get tough is always good. You have to be your own cheerleader because even though there's thousands of people out there, it's you in the road.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm a big fan of the short little mantras. I posted the other day where I went out too fast on an out and back and I had to get back and it was hilly and my mantra was just like pay the piper, you got to pay. I don't even know if that makes sense, but I was like you did it. You got to pay the piper to get back and I just kept telling myself a weird mantra hey, I got, I got home.

Speaker 3:

So that was the important thing, you know, as you mentioned about the 80 year old and the tears so many inspiring at at a race. Do you have one moment that stands?

Speaker 2:

out to you that resonates with you. Oh, my goodness, you've had a lot of good answers already, so it's okay if you don't, but is there you know, one finish line moment or something you saw on the course that just felt like it was true? Disney.

Speaker 3:

Oh, my goodness, I can't. I really can't think of one specific, I think just overall finish line feels are there's nothing like it and highly recommend for anyone, because if you haven't seen that inspiring moment like I have, you'll see like hundreds within a couple hour span.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, particularly when you get. You get towards the end of the race and a lot of first timers, people who didn't think that they could do it, and I want to thank you actually as one of those people who does stay, because that's another thing that I think Carissa would agree. We've seen a lot more people staying to the end and cheering folks on Because it is, it's emotional, it's cathartic, even if you didn't take part in the race, to see people you know have overcome so much to get there and no matter the distance, when you start the race, there's always a little doubt in everybody's head that they can get to the end. Anything can happen. So thank you for being one of those folks who stays. All right. Now, brooke, you're incredibly popular already, but for people who might not know, where can they follow you? On your various social media sites, which I'm like you, I generally understand most of them when can they follow you? And is there anything that's next for you, anything else you'd like to let people know that's coming up for you?

Speaker 3:

On Instagram, you can find me at BB Brooks. So just three B's and the rest of my name, bb Brook. And I also have an Instagram for my business, which is shop BB Brook, and that's the same as my website. And the next time you'll really be able to see me is at the expo at springtime. Surprise, my is pastel and rainbow and you cannot miss it. And, yeah, I'll be on the course for all the races too. And, like I mentioned earlier, one of my absolute favorite things is connecting with people in person. I think social media is great, but human connection is just absolutely the best, and that was, that's just one of the best parts about running Disney. So say hello. I'm usually very awkward, but I love to say hello.

Speaker 2:

Good, it's okay, and I'm sure people feel the same way too, because they feel like they know your whole life, but then they see you in real life and they want to say hi. So it's just making that connection. So come see Brooke at the Expo.

Speaker 3:

Oh, I have one thing, John, so I've listened to the podcast and everyone you mentioned how you run a 5K and I don't think you have today and you just did another one.

Speaker 1:

I did.

Speaker 3:

So I wanted to say congratulations, I did.

Speaker 1:

I don't know when this will come out, but I did. I'll explain it later, but because you've been so great, Brooke, I'm going to tell you what my life is like and how little control I have over anything that I do at any point in time. Point in time is the way I ended up running that as I was going up to the Galloway weekend with Carissa and Weston for Jeff's weekend to record, we recorded stuff for the podcast and had a great time up there, and two days before we left my work, wife Carissa Galloway called my actual wife, Jodi Chase, and asked if I would run a 5K. I was not involved in this decision at all.

Speaker 2:

Well congratulations, I know.

Speaker 1:

You did amazing.

Speaker 2:

Like we'll talk about it.

Speaker 1:

It was great. I'm really glad I did it, thank you. But apparently this does not abrogate my responsibility that I now still have to run a 10K because I said do 5Ks, guys, do the math, do the math. Where's my medal? But thank you for that. I very, very much enjoyed it actually.

Speaker 2:

Well, good, and that's the thing we just want people to. Like you said, we want them to be healthy for as long as we can. It matters. So being able to go the distance at any speed is a great day. This has been a great time chatting with you. Thank you so much, and we will see you at springtime, on the course and at the expo.

Speaker 3:

See you then, Thanks, Brooke, Thank you All right athletes.

Speaker 2:

Here's the drill Time to shape up your diet, harissa, give them the goods. All right, let's talk about something, john, today that came up I mean twice. I'm not going to over-exaggerate how much it came up. Maybe it came up three times at the Jeff Galloway weekend and that was protein at breakfast. Talking about people's breakfast and me saying, hey, you're not getting enough protein. Your protein at breakfast you're usually Greek yogurt. Guys, I think you're doing pretty good right.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, generally, I would say there are about three meals that are our go-to meals. The Greek yogurt with some fresh fruit and chia seeds and my wife makes homemade granola too is is generally a go-to. I try to have a couple of eggs a week, depending on how, um, you know, either a scrambled egg, sometimes make a small omelet, something like that, and then I am a big fan of both oatmeal and cream of wheat, so I might throw one of those in there as well, but that that's generally it. Breakfast, probably my healthiest meal of all of them.

Speaker 2:

Well, I think a lot of times people don't understand when I say like you want to have 20 to 25 grams of protein at breakfast. That's really important. And the reason why the protein at breakfast is important is because the satiety, so it's going to keep you fuller longer, which is going to reduce your snacking and overeating through the day. For muscle health, the protein is giving your body these essential amino acids that are going to help muscle repair and growth, especially for I think everybody listening that's physically active. It also enhances your metabolism because protein requires more energy to digest compared to carbohydrates or fat, so that's just a slight increase in calorie expenditure. And then, with that satiety that I mentioned in the beginning, stabilizing blood sugar levels. That helps your productivity. That helps prevent energy crashes and gives you steady energy throughout the morning. So 20 to 25 grams is probably a big jump for most people. But I just want you to take a look at your breakfast. Where can you add in more protein? So two eggs is going to give you 12 grams. Greek yogurt is going to give you around 17 grams. Again, be mindful of the sugar. Cottage cheese really great, low sugar, high protein 14 grams. If you're putting in protein powder. You're doing a smoothie. That's easy because it's about 30 grams per serving, so you're great, right there. Tofu I know some of you are rolling your eyes at me, but that's really great for scrambling, for eggs, for a breakfast wrap, for an alternative, that's about 10 grams. Turkey, bacon or sausage use that sparingly, but it's about five grams per slice. Or link. Nut butters are a great one about eight grams if you're adding in two tablespoons of nut butter and then milk. Look for plant-based milk. Shun the almond, shun the oat. They don't have protein. So you want to have a milk with protein soy milk, dairy milk, pea milk or I think there are some options now for the oats with soy, with silk that has added in the protein. So really make that a goal. If you do that and you stick with it for three weeks, I challenge you not to see differences in the rest of your day. I really do. And then, if this is like, you're like yes, I think I can do this. I want to revamp my diet, my energy, my nutrition, healthier. You is there for you.

Speaker 2:

12-week online course. It's always enrolling so you can sign up at any time. The course unfolds in 12 weeks to add on your knowledge, but you have a year to access it, a year of our monthly group chats. In April, jeff Galloway is joining us for a special chat, so make sure you sign up by mid-April to get that. And then in May we're doing budget-friendly meals. So that's another great chat. So go to GallowayCoursecom. If you use the code Jeff, you can save $175. That's GallowayCoursecom.

Speaker 1:

Hey, and can I shout out to tofu for just a second, because you said I was one of those people who rolled my eyes a lot when tofu was brought into it. But do your research online, folks. It's really a preparation thing. I know there are ways that a lot of people don't like it, but you can incorporate tofu into your diet and my wife and I have on any number of ways and there are a lot of different preparations. So it's not your grandparents' tofu folks. There's plenty of ways to bring tofu into your diet and it really is a positive for you. We found it to be a positive.

Speaker 2:

Look at Johnny Yay tofu. Good job Athletes, listen up, it's mail call time.

Speaker 3:

Announcer free present.

Speaker 1:

All right, thank you, sarge. We have a listener story here. This is from Ashton. Shout out to Ashton and here's the story. My name is Ashton.

Speaker 1:

I just completed my first marathon in Dopey this weekend. I know you'll probably get many emails reaching out, but I wanted to reach out and express how thankful I am for everything you do for each of us runners. My first marathon was absolutely amazing. It didn't sink in that I was going to become a marathoner until I heard Carissa at the finish line say on the microphone something along the lines of how we're officially marathoners once we cross that finish line. I don't remember the exact wording because, honestly, it's such a blur and we all understand that.

Speaker 1:

Ashton, all I know is that it all hit me as soon as she said that and I just burst into tears again. Thank you for everything you do for each of us run Disney runners. You guys are incredible and thank you for reaching out, ashton, and I love that, carissa, because, uh, you know when I'm not obviously a veteran runner, but my whole experience running my first 5k there it was a lot of a blur and I a lot of. It came back to me later when I was crossing the finish line because I was like, just get there, get there. So, ashton, congratulations for having such focus that you were just with the blinders on at the finish line.

Speaker 2:

I mean, I didn't realize it when I picked this story, but I thank you, ashton, for listening to us, because sometimes we are background chatter, uh, and she sent a picture and you can see in her face that realization of this goal, that for people it's years and years in the making, sometimes years of not feeling the courage to sign up. That moment you were, you always will be a marathoner. That can never be taken away from you. So thank you, ashton, for sharing. We hope to see you at another finish line soon and if you guys have questions or you want to share your story, you can do that at three, two, one go podcast at gmailcom or on our instagram. Thank you to brooke the brooke and, uh, we will see you guys. We're getting very close to springtime, so we will see you very soon, bye-bye.

Speaker 1:

3, 2, 1, go.

Podcast Interview With BB Brooke
Thanksgiving Meal Planning and Leftovers
Embracing Pain for Elite Running Success
Disney, Athletics, and Running Journey
Evolution of Disney Race Culture
Passion and Community in Racing
Run Disney Expo Experience
Mental Health and Social Media Support
Importance of Asking for Help
Disney Experiences and Peloton Favorites
Protein at Breakfast
Thank You for My First Marathon