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Meb Keflezighi: Boston Marathon Champion Reflects 10 Years Later

April 04, 2024 Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey Season 1 Episode 45
Meb Keflezighi: Boston Marathon Champion Reflects 10 Years Later
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321 GO!
Meb Keflezighi: Boston Marathon Champion Reflects 10 Years Later
Apr 04, 2024 Season 1 Episode 45
Carissa Galloway and John Pelkey

Embark on a captivating journey as we celebrate a decade since Meb Keflezighi's heart-stirring victory at the Boston Marathon. His narrative isn't just one of athletic prowess; it's a profound reminder of the resilience of the human spirit. Throughout the episode, Meb's reflections on his remarkable win weave through our discussion, touching on the mental strategies that crown champions and the deep sense of patriotism that his victory instilled.

As we chat with Meb, you'll be privy to the thrilling moments that define marathon running—both the trials and the hard-fought triumphs. Discover the strategies that Meb employed in his historic run and how visualization and perseverance can be your allies, whether you're an elite athlete or someone who's lacing up for their first 5K. Alongside these inspiring accounts, we share a personal running encounter that brings home the importance of safety and community within the sport, adding another layer to the complex tapestry of long-distance running.

Meb's enduring impact on running goes far beyond his victories, and as you tune in, you'll discover a community that thrives on support, inspiration, and the shared joy of the running journey.

Find more about Meb- Instagram
https://www.mebfoundation.org/

Send us a Text Message.

Support the Show.

Let Registered Dietitian Carissa Galloway lead you through a science-backed plan to transform the way you think about your diet.
Visit www.GallowayCourse.com and use the code PODCAST at checkout for a great discount!

Become a 321 Go! Supporter. Help us continue to create! HERE

Join Customized + over a $500 discount! HERE you get-

  • 6 Months of Customized Training
  • 6 Months of Healthier U chats
  • 30-day Summer Nutrition Shake Up


Follow us! @321GoPodcast @carissa_gway @pelkman19

Email us 321GoPodcast@gmail.com

Order Carissa's New Book - Run Walk Eat

Improve sleep, boost recovery and perform at your best with PILLAR’s range of magnesium recovery supplements.
Use code 321GO at www.theFeed.com to get 15% off

Let Sara Akers with RunsOnMagic plan your next runDisney weekend!
IG @runsonmagic or you can go to www.RUNSONMAGIC.com or email her ...

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Embark on a captivating journey as we celebrate a decade since Meb Keflezighi's heart-stirring victory at the Boston Marathon. His narrative isn't just one of athletic prowess; it's a profound reminder of the resilience of the human spirit. Throughout the episode, Meb's reflections on his remarkable win weave through our discussion, touching on the mental strategies that crown champions and the deep sense of patriotism that his victory instilled.

As we chat with Meb, you'll be privy to the thrilling moments that define marathon running—both the trials and the hard-fought triumphs. Discover the strategies that Meb employed in his historic run and how visualization and perseverance can be your allies, whether you're an elite athlete or someone who's lacing up for their first 5K. Alongside these inspiring accounts, we share a personal running encounter that brings home the importance of safety and community within the sport, adding another layer to the complex tapestry of long-distance running.

Meb's enduring impact on running goes far beyond his victories, and as you tune in, you'll discover a community that thrives on support, inspiration, and the shared joy of the running journey.

Find more about Meb- Instagram
https://www.mebfoundation.org/

Send us a Text Message.

Support the Show.

Let Registered Dietitian Carissa Galloway lead you through a science-backed plan to transform the way you think about your diet.
Visit www.GallowayCourse.com and use the code PODCAST at checkout for a great discount!

Become a 321 Go! Supporter. Help us continue to create! HERE

Join Customized + over a $500 discount! HERE you get-

  • 6 Months of Customized Training
  • 6 Months of Healthier U chats
  • 30-day Summer Nutrition Shake Up


Follow us! @321GoPodcast @carissa_gway @pelkman19

Email us 321GoPodcast@gmail.com

Order Carissa's New Book - Run Walk Eat

Improve sleep, boost recovery and perform at your best with PILLAR’s range of magnesium recovery supplements.
Use code 321GO at www.theFeed.com to get 15% off

Let Sara Akers with RunsOnMagic plan your next runDisney weekend!
IG @runsonmagic or you can go to www.RUNSONMAGIC.com or email her ...

Speaker 1:

Welcome to 3-2-1-Go the podcast. I'm John Pelkey.

Speaker 2:

And I'm Carissa Galloway, and we're bringing you stories from start to finish to keep the everyday athlete motivated to keep moving towards the next finish. John, I am kicking things off today because our guest is a legend, a friend and an inspiration. He is the first runner in history to win the New York City Marathon, the Boston Marathon, and an Olympic medal. He's an author, a philanthropist it is Meb Kofleski. Oh, so excited that he could join us. He's celebrating his 10th anniversary, as most of you know, of his historic and emotional win at the Boston Marathon. I was verklempt, if you will, several times during the taping because that win, to me, john, I even have goosebumps saying it right now still is a sports victory that means so much to me.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, he's a name that I think people who are just casual observers know about Meb. You also have a chance to talk to him about his charitable foundation, team Meb at this year's Boston Marathon. And healthier you is this true will get sour with tart cherries. I love tart cherries. And answer a question about porta-potties. Oh, I have the most disturbing porta-potty story, but I don't think I really want to tell it. It's not something that happened to me, but it happened to a friend of mine. So we'll see how this goes. It might, I might, tell it, and then Weston would probably choose to edit it out.

Speaker 2:

Oh well, that's a good teaser for you guys to listen to the whole episode. Meb Cherries, porta potties. But before we get there, a thank you to you for rating, for subscribing, for sharing. Yell at other runners as you pass them out there to listen to 3, 2, 1, go, and let's do this. 3, 2, 1, go. 3, 2, 1, go. All right, john, we're going to kick this off. As we sat down, I was eating a bagel. You said you were eating a bagel that you made in the air fryer. Please explain.

Speaker 1:

All right, yeah, you know me. I spend most of my days, as we now have questions from people coming in. John, what do you do with yourself all the time? Because we can't really figure out how I kill time.

Speaker 1:

But I do spend an inordinate amount of time looking for recipes and trying to make new things, particularly with the air fryer. And you know listeners of the show know that getting an air fryer in my oven was a big deal. But this was my conventional air fryer on the top of the counter, sort of air fryer that most folks have. And I found a recipe which is you take a half of a bagel, put it in your air fryer, crack an egg on top of that bagel, surround it with pesto you have to be a pesto lover to love this Surround it with pesto, Sprinkle shaved Parmesan cheese on it, Spice it any way you want. You can add other things.

Speaker 1:

I just went with the traditional, this one. Then you air fry for about, depending on how you want, your yolk, anywhere from six to ten minutes on high, and then, when you take it out, just drizzle a little bit of chili oil on it to give it that little extra kick. I will tell you what my wife's now. She often says this and I think it's just to keep me trying recipes this is one of the best things you've ever made for me.

Speaker 1:

I get that one a lot but I got to tell you really tasty if you're a pesto fan.

Speaker 2:

You didn't take a picture. No, I don't take a picture of my food. I know, but okay, so you have like in a sheet because I feel like that could be messy with the pesto. Do you have any one of those little parchment things?

Speaker 1:

I did not have a parchment thing to do, so I have to clean out. You're right, it was a little bit messy, though you could drizzle the pesto. I was pretty good about drizzling the pesto on so that it really wasn't sliding off the edge. The bigger problem was the shaved parmesan that melted a little bit, but there's a little cleanup there. I just didn't happen to have any of the parchment. I thought I had some, but yeah, I would recommend doing that. In the video I found and I think it was on Instagram for this recipe or TikTok, where I find most of them they did use the parchment, so I would recommend that I instead just Pam sprayed my basket so it wouldn't stick, but it was delicious and it's only half a bagel, which normally for me, if I go with the traditional you know I love the cream cheese and tomato or the you know the whole smoked salmon thing, the lox and bagel I'll eat two parts of the, both halves of the bagel and, frankly, look at me, don't really need that.

Speaker 2:

Well, I have a nice Dave's everything bagel, so 12 grams of protein in my bagel. You got some good protein there. So checking the box on breakfast, I hope you guys out there.

Speaker 1:

Can I ask you, as a as a, as a as a dietician pesto how's? Pesto for you.

Speaker 2:

So it has a lot of fat in it. It's very calorie dense because it's made from a lot of olive oil, but if you're comparing it to an alfredo with a cream base, there are the benefits of the olive oil. It's one of those ones where go ahead and use. I went to a pesto making class outside of Florence, at Cinque Terre, in someone's home. A little bit awkward, a little bit interesting, but there's a lot of good things in it. Right with the basil, but just watch how much you're using, because it is primarily an oil.

Speaker 1:

And what I like about it is it's incredibly flavorful, so you don't really need to use a lot to get all of that flavor. And then, with this, a little of the chili oil, just to, you know, get you sweating a little bit. Get a little. You know me, I like a little heat in my food bit.

Speaker 3:

Get a little you know me, I like a little heat in my food.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Highly recommend it. By the way, when I'm in Florence because we're going to be in Tuscany this summer we're doing cooking classes as well, so I'll have a lot to report on come this August. Well, thank you guys for listening to John and I's audition for the Food Network yes, you know I have friends who won the first year of America's Next Food Star, the first season of that, my friend Steve and Dan.

Speaker 2:

I loved that show, loved that show so much so the chances that I could get it too, very, very slim. That show's not on anymore.

Speaker 1:

No, and I loved that. No, I liked it.

Speaker 2:

Especially being like a performer and knowing behind the scenes and all that kind of stuff. I just really really liked it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I like all those cooking shows. Question how was your last long run? And explain to everybody the difference between your short run and your long run distance wise?

Speaker 2:

Explain it to me frankly. Well, so for me, a maintenance run, a short run, three to four miles, maybe one to two times a week, and sometimes that's speed work. It's going to be done at an easy pace. So a couple weeks ago I did the tempo miles. I really really, really, really want to run a big marathon with lots of people, lots of crowds, but I don't want to be away from my family another weekend. I don't want to have to travel another weekend. So I just am not doing that right now, just because being at races almost every weekend through the next couple of months just makes it hard. And then I want to be home with the kids and Claire has gymnastics and blah, blah blah. So I just thought I would create my own. It's kind of based off what Carrie Tolson does in the summer. I'm just going to go one mile more each week. So this week was eight miles. I'm not sure how high I get. I'll probably get bored around the half marathon mark. It was eight miles.

Speaker 2:

So we live on the trail, on the West Orange Trail, and I love the West Orange Trail. I go on it all the time. This was at like noon on a Monday. There's plenty of people and I get past for people who are familiar, the Killarney Station, which is the farther on the west, and it kind of people tend to go into Winter Garden. They go that way, they don't go the other way. So I still had a mile to do before I could turn around. I like my out and back routes and so I'm going and it gets down to like not a lot of traffic there's. You're kind of barricaded in where there's a fence, where there's a shopping center and then a fence for like a road. And I had one headphone in, because I always wear with one headphone and I'm running and this guy is being very demonstrative, he's walking, and so I take my headphone out because I'm like I want to see what's going on here and he's I can hear him from kind of far away yelling, just screaming, and I'm like what kind of phone conversation is he having? As I get up closer to him he's yelling like military terms. He's like Romeo, romeo, echo, platoon, down, down, go, go. He's having this whole very strange PTSD or something type thing.

Speaker 2:

And a guy on a bike goes by and he says to me be careful, he's crazy. And then the guy turns and kind of starts coming towards me and he's yelling all this stuff and he's gesturing like he's like shooting and stuff, and I don't know what to do. In hindsight I should have at that point turned around and gone back towards like where there were more people, but I was just scared. So I just kind of run away. I get up on top of the hill, I hide in a bush, in like the bushes, to like see if he's coming or not. He kind of goes by and then he turns back.

Speaker 2:

Well, now I'm like freaked out. I'm like what do I? What do I do? Cause I have to pass back him, to go back and my heart rate is elevated. So I think I was like I'll just keep running away. Well, then I'm running further away and then I'm getting tired and then I'm like I still got to get back and it wasn't like I call Weston. He didn't answer. That's another story. So I'm scared, like I don't know what to do.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, no, no, I don't want to make light of it, yeah it's frightening.

Speaker 2:

So I the ask one of the bikers to kind of go with me back. There was a guy, can you come with me? And he kind of goes forward or whatever, and the guy's still there, still yelling. I run by my heart rate. I was having a great run. Before that, Like in our notes, I wrote like mental running, I was having a great mental sort of breakthrough with running and then the rest of the way back was so hard because my heart rate I couldn't get it to go back down from like being scared.

Speaker 2:

My point out there is for women especially. We just have to be careful and I didn't make the smartest choice. I should have turned down right away. I have one of those alarm things called a birdie where you can pull it and it will make loud noises. And then Weston was like that could have triggered that particular man more.

Speaker 1:

Right, yeah, you that could have triggered that particular man more Right right, yeah, you don't know what he's going through.

Speaker 2:

So anyway, a little bit scary but a good reminder to, no matter when you're running, be alert, Don't have all your headphones in, and then if you are someone who's out there running a biker, be alert too. And thank you for the gentleman who kind of slowed his race down and not raced, but ran it and helped me out.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I've ridden. I haven't done a long run anywhere. Well, I haven't done a long run period Out there. I mean, you get out a little bit. I really appreciate that.

Speaker 2:

You were just like yeah, when I do my long run.

Speaker 1:

But I rode bikes. I've ridden bikes on the West Orange Trail on any number of occasions, and you can get out there where it is a little bit remote. So safety, not a bad idea, not a bad idea. And then when you get out there too, you get those. Do you ever get the cyclists who are just a little too intense about what they're doing?

Speaker 2:

Well, that's another conversation that I think a lot of cyclists are very intense a lot. Some of them are very wonderful. I like the ones where, like I'm as far over on the side of the road as I'm supposed to be, I have one head phone in and they're just belligerently like screaming oh yeah, oh yeah, that, oh yeah, that, oh yeah. That, which then scares me. And then I like jump Like I can hear you coming, like but thank you. So no, I love the cyclist, it's just a different.

Speaker 1:

This is not the Winter Garden West Orange Trail Chamber of Commerce discussion that we should be having. For anyone who might be thinking I don't know, I'll just keep running around the track.

Speaker 2:

It keeps your mind engaged because there's a lot to go to see a lot to do. Yeah, but I love it out there and it's going to get pretty hot, but I'm still going to not wake up early and run.

Speaker 1:

Well, and today here's some inside baseball for people listening.

Speaker 2:

Always talking about the weather.

Speaker 1:

It's going to be. We have some severe weather coming in and it's like wind gusts up to 40 miles an hour.

Speaker 2:

Do you know what? I have to keep a look at my phone, not for right now, but in a little bit, because I might have to pick up Claire early, because they don't let the kids out if it's lightning, so I might have to get there in enough time to pick her up. Speaking of which, I just got a tornado watch alert.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we're having a little bit of that, my kid freaks out, so I will keep an eye on her.

Speaker 2:

You guys keep an eye on safety, Keep an eye on the weather. All right, John, before we dive in further, do you watch since we're all talking about the Boston Marathon, it's Meb's episode. Do you watch the Boston Marathon on Marathon Monday, Patriots Day.

Speaker 1:

If I'm not working, I do, and sometimes even when I'm working, I think. If you remember, back to the Boston bombing situation, I was watching it at work at the Indiana Jones Epic Stunt Spectacular and I reached out to you.

Speaker 3:

Yep.

Speaker 1:

Because I didn't know if you'd heard yet because we were watching it live when everything happened. So, yeah, and I actually recorded on my DVR as well. I find it fascinating. I always was somewhat interested in it, again being the bell cow of all races, really, when you think about distance running. But obviously over the years, the 20 years I've been working with, run well what was previously not run Disney but Disney races. Let's just say that, yeah, I've become really, really interested in it. I need to go back to Boston and, on a golf cart, take that course because I want to see what it's like.

Speaker 2:

Do you remember when Meb won, because that was the year after the bombing? Do you remember watching that year? Oh, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. Because, all the discussions with Cree, kelly and our friends who are, you know, such a wide berth in the running community. They talk a lot about Meb, so I knew who Meb was prior to his winning in Boston. Yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 2:

Well, this is you guys. Well, you have great listening for you today. Meb has. He goes through his, his journey, his story and then state of the end. There's a, I think, a hilarious moment about him going out on the run, as he is a Tampa resident now. So that's coming right up after we thank our sponsors, starting with Pillar Triple Magnesium.

Speaker 2:

I love Pillar. They're a sports micronutrition company and they develop products that intersect between pharmaceutical intervention and sports supplements, and it's made for athletes and everyday athletes. I love their Triple Magnesium. I use it at night. It's designed for sleep, but also recovery. So, after that eight miler, that's what I took. You guys know that I love magnesium and this is a really special blend a high dose of magnesium glycinate, what is a powerhouse ingredient used by triathletes John Ferdino, ben Knute, gwen Jorgensen, olympic gold medalists and more. It helps you recover, because it helps you get better sleep and get you to that start line and the best condition over and over again. I think this would be something great to add to your pre-run Disney night sleeps. We love Pillar. We thank them for their support. You've got time to get yours. Go to thefeedcom it's in our show notes too but use the code 321GO and save, and you'll thank me later.

Speaker 1:

Yes, you will. We also want to thank our good friend, sarah Akers, with Runs on Magic. Now, sarah, a lover of Run Disney herself, always loves helping you plan those magical Run Disney weekends. But that's not all folks. With Sarah, the world is your oyster, whether you're looking to book a honeymoon getaway and if you are congratulations on your upcoming nuptials. Brandon All-inclusive girls trip, boys weekend to Vegas to blow the family fortune, family cruise, international adventures, whatever she is here and at your service, Carissa can attest to the fact that she will give you the help you need.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, honestly, guys, if there's someplace you want to go and you've never used a travel agent, just do it. She's going to give you complimentary travel planning services, the itinerary, answer, all your questions. So go to her website and use the promo code 321GO when you request a quote. That's all you're doing. You're not committing to anything. You're getting a quote and you can be entered to win up to a $200 Disney gift card or a booking credit. You can find her on Instagram, at runs on magic, where she shares special offers and more, or email her at RunsOnMagicTravel at gmailcom.

Speaker 3:

Okay, civilians, it's time for the goods. Let's get on to the interview.

Speaker 2:

We are so excited to have what I'm going to call America's most beloved marathoner on 321 Go today. He is a bestselling author, philanthropist and the first runner in history to win the New York City Marathon, the Boston Marathon and an Olympic medal. And today Meb is committed to helping others run to win and truly nurturing the sport of running for the next generation through the Meb Foundation. Please welcome the coolest runner out there, meb Kofleski. How you doing, meb? How are you and where are you?

Speaker 3:

Hi, carissa, thanks for having me on the podcast. I appreciate it and I am in Tampa, florida, and soon to be, hopefully, san Diego for the Carlsbad 5000 next week and then Boston Marathon. So the travel is going to be deep, but at the same time, just delighted to be here with you today.

Speaker 2:

Two awesome races. I've never been there for Carlsbad, but I just hear it's just epic.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, the fastest 5K in the world for many years I think, like 16 world records, eight American records, and I'm part of owner with John Smith there. I used to go grow up watching that race when I was in high school, so it's the 39th anniversary, I believe, this year. So to go this is the 39th anniversary, I believe, this year, so it's pretty big. And then we changed the course slightly just because some of the middle of the pack or the back of the pack runners sometimes have to wait for the train to cross. So we changed that. It's going to be out and back course, with a lot of ocean view on Highway 101. So very scenic but beautiful, fast 5k and looking forward to it.

Speaker 2:

How many times have you run it?

Speaker 3:

I ran it twice as a professional but I, you know I went out so hard to break the American record. It was Mark Davis who went to my high school American steeplechaser went to the same high school. Coach, Ed Ramos coached both of us and then his record was 13.25,. I want to say, and I went hard, I went out 4.08 and then died Because the downhill didn't even help, couldn't get any help there.

Speaker 3:

But there was a little hill and then downhill and then just out too hard. And then Sammy Kipkater ran under four minutes for the first mile and still ran for 13 flat. So it's a fast course it can be, but I made a mistake. I went out hard and then finished. I believe I was fourth and I ran 13, 37 and the next year I started slower, like 427, and then crashed the last two miles fast and then I ran the same exact time 13.37, and consistency is the name of the game again.

Speaker 2:

Do you ever feel like, when you're talking about times like that, you need to be like and I didn't have super shoes. Do you ever feel?

Speaker 3:

like you need to qualify that. Hey, I'm a pre-super shoes era. You know all my times have been that way.

Speaker 2:

It's funny, I would have been so much faster. You never know you.

Speaker 3:

It's funny I would have been so much faster? You never know. You know a runner is a runner at the end of the day, from point one or point A to point B. But at the same time sometimes you do wonder, but you know sometimes, if it wasn't humid or if it wasn't hot, if I didn't have those shoes. There's always excuses, but at the end of the day, as long as you get out the best that you can for that day, that's what matters.

Speaker 3:

And I feel very people used to ask me is this two hour possible or what? You know? It is obviously Elliot Kipchoge has done that unofficially and Kipton was ready to do next month, calvin Kipton and but I think on my heydays, my, when I ran 27, 13, 10k or 13, 11, 5k with that at that same age, maybe 25 to you know, 28, 29, would have been a huge with the super shoes. So you know, kipchoge, I think his age is a little bit not on his side, but definitely the ability was there. So it would be interesting to see who the next person would be able to try to break two hours officially on like fast course, yeah, so it's kind of exciting to see.

Speaker 3:

And then, you know, the beauty of our sport also is. Carissa is to be participant in that. You know you are part of that journey, running together in the same course, where the two hours might be broken or where I won the Boston Marathon or New York City Marathon, to be part of that journey together and say, hey, I do a lot of speaking engagements or meet and greet. It's like, hey, I was in 2009 when you won the New York City Marathon Actually, that was my first marathon. Or I was on mile 17 of the Boston Marathon when I heard the announcement you won and I was not having a great day, but your win just lift me up, and things like that. So we share the same camaraderie of what the sport has to offer.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think that's one of the coolest things about those World Marathon majors. Speaking of those Boston Marathon, we are just a few weeks away from the 128th Boston Marathon, which, for you, will be the 10th anniversary of your win there, when you think about that?

Speaker 3:

does it feel like 10 years have passed? No, absolutely it does not feel like 10 years have passed, but my body feels that way.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you just did a long run getting ready for that race.

Speaker 3:

Back in the days I used to, you know, 20 mile long run was I don't want to say piece of cake, but it was pretty easy for me. It was a lot of my God-given talent and. But I also retired in 2017, competitively, after doing 26 marathons competitively, one marathon for each mile. Because people often, often, ask how far is the Disney marathon, how far is the Boston marathon, how far is the New York marathon? Okay, all 26.2. Some of our hillier, some of our downhill, some are flat, flat. But so, in honor of that I was, when I got to 19 or something, I decided you know what I'm going to do one marathon for each mile to educate people. And I wrote a book. It's called 26 marathons to oh I haven't, I got it.

Speaker 2:

I've been doing some, I've been fact checking myself I appreciate that.

Speaker 3:

So tell so stories is pretty cool. And then now, as I approach 10 years later, when I won the Boston Marathon and to run for charity, you know, for the Met Foundation, maintain an excellent balance to health, education, fitness for youth, to empower youth is important to me and I feel, you know, delighted to be able to partake and I know my body. You know some people might have seen my Strava or some things that I've been doing, but they hurt and I'm not going to win.

Speaker 1:

People think you're going to win it.

Speaker 3:

It's not going to happen. That's a guarantee.

Speaker 2:

You're like, I was like the oldest person, one of the oldest people to win when I won yeah, if it was easy to win.

Speaker 3:

I would have won in 2015. I would have done it in 2017 and many other times when I tried, but we just got to respect the course, you got to respect the distance and I got to respect the training. And my training has gotten me good enough to get to that finish line around three hours what I'm shooting for. So, hopefully, if I could do that, I'd be completely happy. And what a great cause. And I've done the Martin Richard Foundation for 2017 for the eight year old boy that got killed during the bombing. And I've done for Team for Kids for the New York Runners Charity Program to help kids through sports and running in New York. And then now I want to do a little bit of more work with the MEP Foundation to bring attention and also fundraise for the MEP Foundation to give back to young kids. So that's the reason I'm running 10 years later at the Boston Marathon.

Speaker 2:

Well, it's going to be electric. People are just going to be cheering you on, spiriting you on, but, as you mentioned, there is that bigger purpose for you going back and running. So Team MEM Gives Back is running. Can you tell us a little bit about the team and the process of what everybody's been doing and supporting to get there?

Speaker 3:

Yes, the main fundraising for the MEM Foundation has been through New York City Marathon and the Boston Marathon, which is the official charity program for both those programs.

Speaker 3:

But Team MEM gives back is something that we're trying to initiate for those people that are running at the Boston Marathon that have bibs already. I'm asking you to help me celebrate my 10-year anniversary by donating, giving back to the Meb Foundation. You can always go to mebfoundationorg and give you know if you want to donate, and then we're also going to have brunch, also on Saturday on the 13th at the Fairmont Copley. If you want to get tickets also, you can follow my Instagram at Ron Meb to be able to be there for the brunch and you can come and buy a ticket and fundraise for the Meb Foundation and also, at the same time, celebrate the beauty of the 10-year. While it was because of traffic 11 years ago, which by me winning the 2014 Boston Marathon, kind of feels like a little bit of help lift and then you know, we'll be able to celebrate, and for greater cause. And this is all for the foundation, not personal gratification at all. So it's just kind of finding a way to the fundraising to help the foundation purpose and cause.

Speaker 2:

So even if someone's not running there in the Boston area, they're in the New England area. They want to come down. Anybody spectators, volunteers, anyone is welcome to come to the brunch right.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely, but it's limited tickets, okay, so you got to get them.

Speaker 2:

Don't sleep on it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you can do that, and then you know you can come buy tickets online. And then also, yeah, we'd love to have you there, but again, you can't just walk in.

Speaker 2:

You got to buy the tickets because they will sell out. Yeah, all right, I want to go back. I want to go back 10 years and talk about your win. And when I was writing this podcast then I was going through your book. I get a feeling in my stomach thinking about that race, thinking about you winning, and I'm sure a lot of people out there listening. I mean I have goosebumps right there because to me, to a runner, that's the greatest sports moment in history for so many reasons One, an American winning Boston. But two, what you did to bring that city, to bring the country, to kind of bring everybody joy after such a catastrophic thing, as you mentioned. But I want to even back up further because you raced for years in Boston before winning. It's a hard course and for some runners like you and Des and Shalane, you guys have this pull to like no, I need to win Boston, I want to win Boston. Where did your passion for the Boston Marathon develop?

Speaker 3:

It's funny because when I was a 5K 10K runner at the University of California, in Los Angeles or UCLA, I would sit on the plane and then I would tell them my story, my upbringing and things like that. And I'm from humble beginning of Eritrea. My dad has to walk over 225 miles to save his life so he can have an opportunity to save his wife and six kids. So they're like you should write, you should write a book, call it a run to win and. And I've done it and you know. And then eventually, when I tell my 5k 10k runner, they're like well, have you done the boston marathon? I'm a 5k 10k guy. And then so I hear so many things and been a cross-country runner people always tell me you're going to be a beautiful marathoner. Because I said, say I? Um, you know what is that? Um, bunny rabbit. You know that energize that you know. On the track I could do like 50 laps, no problem, you know things like that.

Speaker 2:

Of course no problem 50 laps.

Speaker 3:

My dad would play soccer, my brothers play soccer, and I was too young and then those people that they were playing against were, um, uh, older than I was. So when I, you know, make a move, finesse, move on them, then they get mad and they would trip me or they want to hit my leg. So they're like they're going to break your son's leg. You might want to take him out. So they took me out, but I'm can't sit around and watch soccer, so I just start running laps in San Diego around the fields and then eventually, you know, the Boston Marathon is the measurement of your. I call it the walking diploma. You know, when you get that jacket, you stamp there that say, hey, I have done the Boston Marathon. Because, as you said, the podcast is for the everyday athlete. Here is the Olympic, the Boston Marathon is the Olympics for the average runners. They're like, oh, I can't go, I'm not a runner. They think that. And then they're like, let me see if I can go around the block. And then becomes one mile, becomes a 5K, becomes a 10K and eventually a half marathon. And then eventually you say, hey, maybe I could do a marathon and then eventually kind of qualify for Boston Marathon. So for me that's always been the case and I remember even I didn't do a marathon until 2002 in New York City, but in 2001, when I was, I heard so many things about Boston how hilly, how difficult it was. When I was trying to purchase a house in San Diego, there was a big hill. I'm like I need to buy that, that house. I don't mind paying 7,500 more just so I can. One day I'll do the Boston marathon and then I'm going to up with that person, join for the extras. I can run from the beach loops and then finish up up a hill. You know stuff like that, like that. So, but my passion for doing the Boston, that's how I started.

Speaker 3:

But winning after I won the silver medal in 2004, I was like excited that I accomplished my mission as the Olympians, olympians, and winning the medal was huge. And then I wanted to win New York City Marathon or the Boston Marathon, which doesn't matter which one comes first, but they were on my bucket list. And eventually, after I won the New York City Marathon 09, I did the, I did the study who else has won an Olympic marathon medal? And New York City Marathon, and then the Boston and there was none. So I'm like you know what that's gonna be my mission, but it was slipping away from me because after 2009, um, you know, I didn't make the Beijing Olympics in 08. I would contemplate retiring. Then, when I came back, went to New York after a year and a half of physical therapy and then 2012 Olympics, I thought that was going to be my end and I was going to retire.

Speaker 3:

In 2013, new York City Marathon I actually, because of Hurricane Sandy, I was otherwise. It was going to be 2013,. New York City Marathon my, my last one after the Olympics, because I don't want to be there just to hang on. I want to if I'm going to ask for appearance fees and demand that what I do, I want to give them my a best effort and and that's what I was thinking and then by finishing fourth at the Olympic Games in 2012, london, then that kind of got another spark of energy. It's like, oh, I can still make another Olympic team possibly, and I can win New York and Boston.

Speaker 3:

And then, obviously, after the bombing happened in 2013, I was there four hours plus watching my fellow runners, because I didn't get those opportunities to watch other runners because of drug testing or media obligation, things like that. But I was there for four plus hours and then I had an appointment. I left an hour before my appointment, which is probably five minutes before the bombing happened, and uh, that that hurt, you know. And uh, not so many lives lost and so many limbs lost and it was devastating mentally, physically and emotionally. But then that evening I remember Bonnie Ford from ESPNcom asked me are you reluctant to come back or are you your mind and frame thinking, are you bringing your family or what's in your head? I'm like I hope to be healthy enough to win it for the people the next year. I remember saying that to her.

Speaker 3:

So when you have this dialogue and you know you cannot script any better than what you described earlier just to be there, the emotion, and to have the victim's name on my bib, to draw inspiration and write them, honor them, and then to guy trying to help lift the city, the united states, and uh, and the sport of running, and there was 36 000 people who wanted to do some same thing to the best they can. Whatever what a day it was, it was a beautiful day and for me I took a risk. You know, in the marathon you take, you don't take too much risk early on. But I did about five miles into it. I'm like my goal was to win top three or run a personal best. If I'm going to do that, I want to be able to just go for it and I did.

Speaker 3:

And then you hear the athlete been in the athlete zone. I don't remember going to the halfway point and even though this was slick college, I'm sure there is a sign, but I don't remember that day. I was just out of it, yeah, zoned, zoned in, and I remember just Fat Boy was going with me and I'm like what was I split at the halfway? He's like I don't remember. Like well, me neither. So Boston's about the title, don't worry about the time and then decided to just keep going.

Speaker 3:

And then, you know, people were so excited no American has won the Boston Marathon since 1983. And I remember at the beginning that morning, um, greg myers, the last american to win the boston marathon, tell me, meb, go get it done. I don't want to be the known as the last american to one. It's been too long. You're smart, you're one of the smartest guy there. Go get it done. So to have that words from him and then to execute a great plan.

Speaker 3:

And then people were chanting usa, usa, fist bumping, usa, usa, I start joining, I start joining them, usa, usa. I'm like focus on the ring, focus on the ring. And then obviously I didn't know how big a lead I had, but I know I had a lead and it was getting narrower and narrower. So I was looking back quite a bit and then my body was going through a lot of changes, like almost like throwing up. But I couldn't go on the side and do that, so just kind of hold it in, kept going. And then, with one mile to go, I'm like if he was feeling good, he should be next to me. He must be hurting. I might want to hurt a little bit more.

Speaker 3:

And what a great honor it was to make a left in a Boston's point-to-point course, making a right turn on Hereford. I said there's a blind spot. Now Sprint as much as he can make the gap look, give up because Gap was getting in five, six, six, seven seconds or so. And with a mile to go, and then making a left on Boston, where everybody dream of been there one day. For me was a dream come true to China, usa, usa and to the cross where the bombing happened. What a electrifying sound it was to be able to just be the first American to win it in 31 years, and all this since 1931 as a close of two. You know, I was two weeks shy of my 39th birthday. I thought winning Boston was slipping away. But it doesn't happen in my time. It happened in God's time. I feel so blessed to be able to pull the victory for all of us.

Speaker 2:

Gosh, just hearing you say that makes me like, it makes me so emotional, it makes me want to cry, because I've run that race, I've been down there and for you to just do that and win and to be able to describe it, it's just, it's so beautiful. And I want to talk about the race because you said you were leading. So if people aren't in, they're not versed in marathon, they can just be. Oh, he led so far, he led the race. It must've been easy. But Tibet got to six, you know, six, seven seconds. If you let up, if you didn't push as hard as you pushed out there by yourself, it could have been a different outcome. How did you keep pushing on those hills all alone?

Speaker 3:

Marissa, I was so much in pain it was ridiculous. But the mind over body, the nine inch above the shoulder is huge. You know. Positive, you know when he was. When I saw him with three miles or 5K to go, when I stood to the right, three things came to mind Slow down, because I do a lot of visualization in my training.

Speaker 3:

It came down me and somebody else, I'm Boylston. So I'm like okay, save your energy, save your energy. Then I'm like, if I save my energy now, he catches up to me, he's going to have the mental edge. So I'm like no, scratch that plant, scratch that plant, quick on your feet. Got to think quick. And I maintain the gap, trying to or trying to extend the gap. Those are your two options right now. If you have, if you let him catch you, he's gonna have, he's gonna have the mental age.

Speaker 3:

So I just said posture, posture, mechanics, forms and all those things. And that's why I think the methamortals book is written, because I I just start a mechanism, mechanism, just stay form, stay tall. All those things that you do, the small things that you think I don't know it's worth doing sometimes, but it became a big payoff for me that day, so to be able to just concentrate on my form, my cadence, and I was in pain. I mean, I was having a big issue underneath my left foot, but you know, and with you know, a mile to go. I just said if he was feeling good he would be next to me. So he must be hurting. Am I willing to hurt a little bit more? It's a lot of more self-talk, a lot of prayers, a lot of no, you know, run to win.

Speaker 3:

Which, again, the best ideas. If he can do this, he can do this and keep persevering. And you know, uh, yes, he got really close. But and then under, under the past one k to go, I remember just saying use the downhill as a gravity. And then then, when you go over the pass, short stride, more arm action, just quick feet, quick feet, quick feet. And then the blind spot where they're making a right on her. For that, for me, that taking the diagonal right to the edge and just sprint, not a sprint, but push the pace as hard as I could. And the crowd was just massive this year coming the other year.

Speaker 2:

It was 10 feet.

Speaker 3:

People were just electrifying and just it was incredible and they lift me up to be able to keep it going.

Speaker 2:

Did you have a moment in the race where you realized I have this, or it wasn't until you made that turn that you really were like could celebrate and just call or even just feel like I'm going to be the Boston Marathon champion?

Speaker 3:

You know Carissa going to the Cisco sign couldn't come fast enough.

Speaker 2:

You can see it forever, and you think you can reach it, but it's not there.

Speaker 3:

You know, it just takes forever. And then, once I got there, I'm like I think I got it, I think I got it, but then it's never over until the tape touches the chest. So, and he was getting closer and closer. So for me, when I got to Wilson, I think I had it, but I just said don't cramp up, don't do something stupid, just use the police. If I accelerate, they're going to accelerate with me. If I decelerate, they're going to decelerate with me. So just use them. And then keep going and going. But just the people cheering you on and chanting USA, usa go, meb, go, it was historic. I mean, it still gives me chills talking about it. It gives us all yeah.

Speaker 3:

Because I only discuss when I have a podcast or speaking engagements. I watch the last two, three minutes of the videos. But you know, it's going to be good to reflect back as I run back 10 years later. But those were, they were. It was just a moment to remember and for me me, you know it hit me when I knew I was going to win, when I did the cross at the bombing and then chanting USA, usa because. But I was nervous also, I was looking back so many times. And then Tibet, the other guy that was coming, chobani, chobani was coming too. So, uh, not that I knew, but an announcement on the tv. They were announcing that's like is Chobani have to worry about? Oh you, and you know I'm like, oh my gosh, I got to go.

Speaker 1:

I got to go.

Speaker 3:

But it was. You know, it was just incredible to be able to you know, when they say you're 2014 Boston Marathon champion, you know you dream of those days and that's when it hit me. I look. When I came across the finish line, I look to the heavens, say thank you, god, for this opportunity. And then when they announced your 2040 Boston Marathon champion is Mebka Flesky, and then I just went to tears. It just hit my soul and then I know I had a greater purpose on earth through running to be here from that day on beyond.

Speaker 2:

You did and you again. You change lives. That will be, again, the greatest moment in sports history for me for maybe the rest of my life. And sports have a really interesting way of when a city undergoes a tragedy, it lifts them up. You think about the New Orleans Saints winning the Super Bowl after Katrina. You think about the Red Sox winning the World Series and then you winning the Boston Marathon. When you looked on paper that day, I think Meb was sitting in the 15 spot or something. Why do you think that happens? Why do you think the cities and the moment and the emotion can take us over and bring us to these Not an improbable victory? You had it within you, skill-wise, to win that race, but the universe just gave you the opportunity to and you took it.

Speaker 3:

You know, when the opportunity provides, you run with them with the horn to the bed. He grab them as much as he can. But I remember just the year of the bombing and when I was there for four plus hours after the Mayo finish came, I remember I sent a text to Ryan Hall. I said we can do this because we talk about in training and things like that. It's like for him, especially for Ryan, it's like man Boston he got New York, I wanted to get Boston. So I'm like me too.

Speaker 3:

But you know things like that. I remember I sent him a text. It was his wife's birthday when she left. They were not in Boston, but we'll get after it. We can do it. We have to believe in yourself.

Speaker 3:

But then you know when you are the 15th fastest guy in the field or the 39th fastest guy at the Olympic Games, or even in New York when I was like the 9th or the 12th fastest guy, you have to count that day. So when you're training you have to visualize yourself. You have to say, hey, am I doing the right thing? You know they have to do their PRs that day. So for me, I'm a competitor at heart. I'm going to do everything I can in training and then to be ready. And then the key to success is preparation. If you do that and somebody beats you and train harder than you or how smart you, then they deserve. I give them a handshake. You deserve to win. But I'm going to do whatever I can that I can control, to be the best athlete, fittest athlete. Been there and make a. You you know good, not making bad mistakes, but be the one to make the least mistakes and don't take the emotion. But I remember in training with Ryan, we talked, oh, boston's going to be incredible. It's going to be like the Tour de France People are going to be coming supporting and all that stuff. So we just got to have how do we get that energy? And not to be too emotional at the beginning of it and save it for the end. So we have those dialogues and training and then, when it came, it's on race day. It's just, it's show time.

Speaker 3:

And, yes, the, according to experts, I had less than one percent chance of winning. I was the 15th person, 15 fastest guy in the field. I was two weeks shy of my 39th birthday, so everything else were against me, but at the end of the day, my heart was in the right place. And the victims? You know I prayed. You know I prayed not only that day, but I prayed when I was training a mammoth that you could only see one deer or one cargo by in the wilderness of you know, 7500 people. There's nothing there in the wilderness. But when you see deers it's like god. I, you know, I feel it. You know, give me the spirit and I want to win the Boston Marathon.

Speaker 3:

So when you do all those things, you have this vision. But my mom always says person thinks it, god finishes it. So for me it's been in my mind for a long time, not only that 2014 or 2013, but for many years to be able to win it. And it all happened in God's time, not my time. Years to be able to win it, and it all happened in god's time, not my time. And now we want not that, we want to really relive or see what happened, not only in boston, but any at any time disaster happens anywhere.

Speaker 3:

Those are tough times, but when those opportunity comes and it drives a little bit more, I got it, that sense of urgency, I gotta do it kind of mentality. And that's what I did. And you know, you know when this, you know you know when this, you know, when I won the Boston Marathon and then the next day President Barack Obama gave me a call and that's when I said, oh, that you know, you do your job to the best you can. But it's like, oh, that was a big deal, I guess you know. You know now that I didn't, you know when it was my dream on call, but affirmation, I guess, to say you know, and he said job well done.

Speaker 2:

You made us all proud, so that meant a lot for me. Well, I mean, I would say thank you for the gift, because you winning that race was truly a gift to the entire endurance community. That keeps on giving. I want to kind of transition to what you said about visualization. You talk about it in your book 26 Marathons. You talked about it here For you. You're visualizing coming down. Boylston isn't a sprint. You're visualizing strength up the hills. You're visualizing breaking that tape For an everyday runner thinking about a big goal or a big race. What should they visualize and how can they use that to their advantage.

Speaker 3:

First off, visualization is in all of us and it doesn't matter if you have, you know, sometimes for us visualizing, visualizing going to the olympic team, or visualizing finishing across our first marathon, or visualizing a one day, you know, people say, hey, I want to qualify for boston. And then I tell them, you know, when I'm do meet and greet and it's like, hey, where are you? What was your long run? Your long run was 16 miles. You need to, you need to bump it to 2021.

Speaker 3:

And when you do that, whenever you are running a hill, think about the Newton Hills, think about the Heartbreak Hills. It doesn't have to be elite athlete to do that. And then, even now, when I ran yesterday, I was visual. I only did nine miles yesterday and I visualized in my turns right on Carrefour, left on Boylston, even though I'm not winning, I'm visualizing myself say, hey, in three weeks I'm going to be running the Boston Marathon, trying to break three hours around that time. But the turn doesn't change. So you have to be able to say, hey, I'm going to run four hours at the Boston Marathon. Visualize that. And when you're running mile seven or mile eight of your local hill, visualize that, hey, I'm going. How am I looking? Going to Boston Marathon, mile 21 at the Heartbreak Hill? It doesn't have to be there with that 21 mile.

Speaker 3:

To put yourself, heartbreak Hill it could be mile seven, it could be mile 10 or whatever it is, but you're having a self-talk to yourself. Say I'm placing myself. It shows how important it is to you and those are the most important thing. Uh, things that to think about you don't have to wait until race day. So when it comes on race day it becomes a second nature. Or someday people are doing half marathon, that one day I want to finish a marathon. That's why I see the tears of joy when they come across, because they've been visualizing, they've been thinking, thinking about that. I'm not a runner. I'm a half a marathon runner now, and one day I want to finish a marathon. And when they come it's tears of joy because they never thought they would be there.

Speaker 2:

I have to tell you, as a race announcer I say it all the time when people cry, it's my favorite thing and it sounds like you know, weird, but I know that it means something to them and it's truly the most beautiful thing to see those tears, because I've never connected it to that. That's, this moment had been visualized, something they'd been thinking of for so long.

Speaker 3:

Or, on the same token, that huge. But then, similarly, people thought, hey, you can't do that. No, you're overweight, you're not going to be able to finish a marathon. And then they said you know what I'm going to prove you wrong marathon. And then they said you know what I'm going to prove you wrong? Or you are the underdog. You're like you know what? You've been written so much off the off the chart of the course. And you're like you know what? I always believed in myself, that I could win or I could place in the top three or make another Olympic team. Or for those people say, hey, you know what? Somebody told me I can't do it, I'm going to prove you wrong. And then when that time happens, happens is like it was hard, the journey was difficult, but now I am at the finish line and look at, and then that's when it hits you. And then it's like, oh my gosh, I never thought I would make it, but I made it. And that's where something makes you cry.

Speaker 2:

And we've talked about great victories. There are great victories, but there's also races that are disappointing and I think when you read through 26 marathons you learn a lot about you know when we Olympic medal, new York state champion, boston marathon champion. But there's races sandwiched in there that you were, you were disappointed or you dealt with injuries. So for anyone out there that is in that place but wants to visualize that bit great success how do you keep believing in yourself after a challenging race?

Speaker 3:

You know, uh, injuries is part of the sport and disappointment is part of life, as I talk about in my books, whether it's 26 marathons or run to overcome. But how do you get back to that? You know, for example, for me, 2007, november, with the trials for the 2008 Beijing Olympics in New York, the day before the New York City Marathon, I was so excited for it, I worked so excited for it, I worked so hard for it that I didn't work any less. But like I want to win, I want to win that race. You know, second at the Olympic Games, second in New York. 70 days later, third in New York, third in Boston. I'm like man, when is that win going to come? So you do whatever you can to train because you crave, you want to do it and you want to persevere, especially in New York for me, because that's where I started my first marathon.

Speaker 3:

I had a lot of followers there, and then I you know I struggled, I was favored, I was a favorite, and then it's like, okay, I can't win it. You know that immediately it's like, okay, plan B, plan B, I got to get second or we got to get third, and then it's like I can't even make the Olympic Games so negative to start happening. It's like maybe I could be the fourth person, so I could be an alternate. Maybe somebody will do the 10K and drop out, scratch out the 10Ks, and then I can be the one moving on. Then it's like, maybe, fifth place, maybe I'll be the second alternate. Whatever it is, self-talk is so important and I unfortunately for me I finished eighth place and which was and my good friend, ryan Shea, who I was sitting at the bus to the starting line, passed away. He had a cardiac arrest, so mentally, physically, I was just beat up. I mean, there's no way of saying it, I was just, you know, just, there wasn't a lot of hope, you know. But then somehow you have to come back and say you know, it puts life in perspective. Okay, not making the Olympic team no big deal, life is more precious. So make you appreciate that.

Speaker 3:

And then eventually I remember we prayed about it with my wife and said you know what, if the silver medal is the end of my career, I'm okay with it. You have to accept it. If it was a 27-13 American record that I got, if that's the end of it, I'm fine with it. But sometimes the spirit attacks you. Your intuition also is there. It's like no, there is more. It just was a bad day, and that bad day doesn't define who I am, but somehow I got to move forward. I love the sport of running. I have to move forward.

Speaker 3:

And then I remember telling them before we left that weekend I guess no Beijing, but my Olympics will be New York City Marathon. And when I said that it was going to be, I thought 2008. But I didn't realize 10 weeks later that I had published a stretcher, so it took a lot longer. But don't lose hope. Don't lose your goals, just set them. Maybe it's even much more sweeter sometimes when there's obstacles in the way because you don't think things for granted and you want to work even harder and be smarter and make good decisions. So to be able to come back and win the New York City Marathon, that was my personal gold medal that I never had.

Speaker 3:

Now that I say, I'm not saying I could have won the gold in 2008, but I remember watching the 2008 Olympic Games. I remember telling my wife, possibly bronze for sure, but possibly silver medal. And then to have the silver medal in New York, to have the fourth-time Boston Marathon champion in New York and then the fastest, third fastest guy, james, come by there. It was just like this was the Olympics for me. I'm going to be able to persevere and that win, wearing USA jersey, meant so much to me and my first marathon victory.

Speaker 3:

So don't to answer your questions. Don't lose hope, but you might have to delay your goals and think there's a light at the end of the tunnel. Don't answer your questions. Don't lose hope, but you might have to delay your goals and think there's a light at the end of the tunnel. Don't be saying you know this short term is going to hurt, it's going to be difficult, but surround yourself with good people. Do the right thing to be able to make sure you come back on track and don't rush it. Don't rush it because when you rush it, you're going to reset yourself and then you're going to lose even more hope for that. So be the one to make a small progress to the right direction.

Speaker 2:

Oh, thank you. I think that answer will help a lot of people, because we hear a lot about that just people that life gets in the way and they start to lose that focus. But I think your story is one of great success but also great perseverance. All right, we're going to wrap soon, but I have a couple more questions. One's a selfish question that I want to know. My son's name is Elliot, named partly after Elliot.

Speaker 3:

Kipchoge and partly after my husband's grandpa, Elliot. What's left in Elliot Kipchoge, Meb the analyst, Tokyo didn't go his way, Boston didn't go his way. Is he going to make the Olympic team and what's left? You know, Elliot Kipchoge is an icon. He did whatever he needs to do. I always tell people, even for me, after winning the silver in New York, everything's frosting on the cake For him. I hope to see him on the Olympic team, but at the same time, Kenya is a hot commodity.

Speaker 2:

Looking at those numbers there, it's crazy.

Speaker 3:

You can run 202 or 204 and not be on the team. It's hard to imagine. But for Ilya Kipchoge's legacy I mean, he he's such a great ambassador for the sport, he's been a wonderful uh connectivity with the runners, just like you know, jeff Callaway or Bill Rogers or um others that have done to be able to give this for someone.

Speaker 3:

I appreciate that and you know connectivity is important because they want to see you be happy, they want to see you be trustworthy and then they will tell you anything. Runners are very open to tell you things and hey, it's my last chemo before a marathon, you know, after that I have that. You hear those things. So I hope he can stick around to kind of hear how much inspiration he has done for many people and generations to come.

Speaker 2:

I'm sure he will. He's made such a huge impact just on people, like you said, believing what's possible. I think, kelvin Kipton, he opened the door to see what was humanly possible there as well. All right, we're gonna wrap our final few questions. What are you excited to eat when you get to Boston? Is there something you love to eat there?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know I get there early this time because I have to make a few appearances, but I go to some Thai place that is there. I'm staying always in the same hotel there and then. But you know there's some restaurants. You know that we have gone and you know steak is big when I can, but the lobster also, whenever I get the main lobster is pretty important close to there, you know. But yeah, I mean, you know sometimes so busy you don't have time to enjoy it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's true, just get whatever you can get Ed eat. And then when my brother sometimes gets before me is like, hey, what can I order you before? And sometimes it's from the hotel and sometimes it's our favorite restaurants.

Speaker 2:

Well, hopefully you get some good Thai food and steak at two separate restaurants. I don't know if Thai cuisine really has a lot of great steak in it. I wouldn't maybe combine the two, all right? We always ask all of our athletes on the podcast this question all of anyone, everyday runners too For you, what is the most inspiring thing you've seen at a road race? An image that stays in your mind, that continues to inspire you besides yourself?

Speaker 3:

I love seeing people exercise. I think that's what the foundation you try to focus on, because we know as an adults how good exercise is. When I see people in fact, yesterday, um, I see this lady just just doing this right on the toe and then it's jamming, and then I and some people know who I am and other don't know but it's just I just thought, hey, you know, if you can just do land a little bit better, mid foot strike or, uh, heels and such like. I've been running my rest of my life like that and I'm like, try the other way around. It's going to save you so much longevity, injury, injury prevention and other things.

Speaker 3:

But what inspires me is people coming across the finish line, you know, feeling good, smiling and happy, because for me, to see people come half marathon or full marathon or any distance in that matter, is to say you know what I am, celebrating life and and coming across the finish line smile, and it just means so much. And the most inspiring sometimes is also when somebody we exhaust ourselves. I've done that my 2017 new york city. I just soon as I finished, I just collapsed, sense of relief, but sometimes just every ounce is energy squeezed out. So that's very motivating. So when I see people give them a lift of hand to help them out from 10 yard or 15 yard, no matter who it is, it's just a joy to see that, because you know that's what the sport is helping each other lift after the best we can. Did this woman know who you were?

Speaker 2:

No, to see that, because you know that's what the sport is helping each other lift off to the best we can. Did this woman know?

Speaker 3:

who you were.

Speaker 2:

No. Was she receptive to this advice, or was she like?

Speaker 3:

she was not. And some of them would say, well, thanks for the tip, I would have my air pod and I love giving feedbacks and it's not for me but for them, I just want them to enjoy. And then there was. I remember one time people one person had the wrong shoes riding on the trails in San Diego I said I am for the, I want you to buy those shoes. I actually am sponsored by them.

Speaker 3:

But this shit is not made for this and you know, because it's going to, it's going to injure you. So there's so many different things. Know whether it is advice, whether it is materialistic or uh, not chafing. And you know taping or compression, so many sunglasses and other things that you can wear to help you be the best version of yourself. But some people, like they're new. I mean we do some. You know set the pace podcast that I'm doing also with rob simicare from the new yorker runners. We're trying to give tips as much as we can, but some people receive it and others don't, and it's okay for me. I'm okay, I did my good deed for the day. I just told her that I want to help her out, but you know, if she says what's your name or sometimes I introduce myself to Boston Marathon. That give me credibility. But sometimes I didn't even say nothing. I just tell them that and leave and then if they take it, take it. If they didn't take it, it's okay.

Speaker 2:

Man, I mean free coaching by Meb. If you guys are in Tampa, just start doing laps, maybe you'll catch up with him someday. Funny story before we really do wrap. I was asking when we were prepping for this. My husband was like how old's Meb? And I was like I don't know.

Speaker 3:

I'll ask Google have you ever tried to ask Google about yourself? No, but I'll tell you a funny story here. So my middle child this is oh man, it was 2016 or 2015. Uh, she was probably eight or nine years old. Um, I wanted to take her with me to this trip and her godmother lives in minnesota.

Speaker 3:

So I had an appearance for cep compression, minnesota, and then I have to go to a bar for like a quick minute, but the hotel I didn't know. The hotel was 400 meters away and you know that was sense of urgency straight from the airport. Go to a bar for like a quick minute. But the hotel, I didn't know. The hotel was 400 meters away and you know that was sense of urgency straight from the airport, go to the bar or whatever. So I'm trying to see, and then I have to go to Boston to do the 10K. So she her name is Fiori, fiori goes, you know.

Speaker 3:

I asked her how long do you, you know, do 10k? She's like well, 24 minutes is my best. And then give me 30 minutes for the next 5k, about an hour or so. So I'm like okay, if I take you, I could run the 10k. It would take me 30 minutes and she's like you can do 10k in 30 minutes. I said yeah, I can, I've done it faster. She's like no, you didn't. She's like you don't trust me, ask siri. So she asked siri, siri, what's mebka flesky 10k time? She's like according to wikipedia, mebka flesky is the boston marathon champion, new york city marathon champion, and he has run 27 13 and she I just opened. I was like you did that. Oh too bad, you trust trace. You trust siri more than you do to me. You know I was trying to make that trip happen, which eventually didn't happen, but that's the only time. But no, I did not ask Siri what my PRs are.

Speaker 2:

Well, Google, Siri might be good. Google was like I don't understand, and so we kept having to say your last name differently, like incorrectly, so that she would understand. And at one point she was like Kofleski is a town in this weird country and there are 10 000.

Speaker 3:

I'm like no, that's not what I'm asking you, so I had to like the coolest one I got is mcbain mcbain, south carolina. Yes, oh, that's close my name no, yeah, I have to.

Speaker 2:

And then, finally, I said the guy named meb, who won the boston marathon, how old is he? And eventually not your last name. I could get her to tell you us your age. I could have just Googled it, but it was more the principle at that point. Well, meb, I hope she doesn't speak up. Meb Kapusky, google's right over here. This has been just an absolute joy. Thank you for reliving the Boston Marathon with us. 10 years later, tell our listeners how can we keep up with you and what's next after Boston?

Speaker 3:

Well, thank you for the opportunity. Three, two, one go podcast. It's great to be with you, carissa, and yeah, for me, you can find me at Ron Meb through my Twitter or Instagram and marathonmebcom is my website and we just launched the 26 hat is back, my hat that I wear so we're going to have a special edition for the Boston Marathon, so it's going to be gold and blue and MapStrong is that an honor for the 10 year anniversary, so you can go to the marathon. Mapcom or MapStrongcom. You can find more. And then, if you want to help out with with the mep foundation is mepfoundationorg is a website and uh, love to get the support in any way.

Speaker 3:

You know and my you know my generosity for me started when I was my dad asked his boss in 1986 to save his wife and six kids. When they asked his boss if he could lend them 10 million lire that was about 6,000 US dollars and Dr Brindisi was my dad's boss and he said is that safe? One person would save everybody. My dad said, with the money that I have saved, it would save everyone. And that generosity from Dr Brindisi and my half-sister, ruth's mom, he gave him 10 million lira cash and he said, this is not a loan, it's a gift. If it wasn't for that generosity, none of my study would have been told, or my brothers and sisters. So you know there's a kind heart in everybody. So if you can visit to the metfoundationorg and give you a generosity, that'd be awesome.

Speaker 3:

And what's next for me? This is my third charity run and I'm excited for it. Nervous at the same time, because, for this is the first marathon in six years that I'm doing and I usually run everyday, runner four miles to six miles a day, five days a week. But now that's that's what I used to do for cool down. As a professional athlete. I gotta work my butt off to get to that finish line of the Boston Marathon in 2024, which is less than three weeks away now. So I'm excited for that and then see what happens as I do. Speaking engagements and appearances, and we also have a new partnership that we're going to announce very soon. So stay in the tune.

Speaker 2:

Yes, and get that Gen U cannon. That's going to help you. I know it helps you a lot to get through all those finishes. You had a great long run. So, jen, you can, and that's going to help you. I know it helps you a lot to get through all those finishes. You had a great long run. So, meb, thank you so much. We will see you in Boston and anytime you want to run Disney, you're always welcome here. You hold up that. I'll hold up the book.

Speaker 3:

There you go. I just had my shake right now. I'm going to take my run so you can, and other sponsors, whether it's CEP and Bank of America and others, have to help me. Support be the best that I can so I could be here with you and be able to share my story. But hey, Disney, keep it up the great work. We were just there last week with my brother and his family visiting us from San Diego, so you know it's a happy place there.

Speaker 2:

It is Well, you're a happy guy. Thank you so much, guys, and thank you, meb Kofleski, for being on 321GO.

Speaker 3:

It was fun, great to be with you, carissa. Good to see you again. All right, athletes, here's the drill.

Speaker 1:

Time to shape up your diet.

Speaker 2:

Carissa, give them the goods. All right, john, you teased it tart cherries, how do you use them? Why do you like them? What do they do for?

Speaker 1:

you. I'm a really big fan of tart things to begin with, and I love cherries, and I will say it's a fruit I don't get back to as often as I would like to, but I love a tart flavor. I'm a big fan of fruit, as you know, so the tart cherry would be towards the top of the list of fruits that I enjoy, and now I believe you're going to tell me that, unlike practically everything else I love, they're not bad for you.

Speaker 2:

You know pesto. I don't know if it's good for runners, but it is olive oil. Anyway, tart cherries have research-backed benefits for runners due to their antioxidants and their anti-inflammatory properties. But it's specifically linked to the tart cherry. A lot of times that's the Montmorency, I believe, tart cherry. So research shows reduced muscle soreness from the anthocyanins and the quercetin, which possess anti-inflammatory properties. So drinking tart cherry juice or the tart cherries after a run could reduce your soreness and aid in recovery. It can also help performance on the flip side, the front side of the workout, because it may enhance your performance by reducing oxidative stress and then again the inflammation, which would boost your endurance and give you quicker recovery between training sessions.

Speaker 2:

Better sleep. Tart cherries are a natural source of melatonin, which is pretty cool. So that is sometimes included in nighttime drinks as well. And then, as we know, with Pillar, sleep quality is crucial for runner's recovery and overall performance. How much right? That's always the question.

Speaker 2:

There's not really a one size fits all recommendations, but research says that eight to 12 ounces of tart cherry juice, or one to one and a half cups of whole tart cherries per day, may provide benefits for runners. So I like to get the tart cherry juice. Keep in mind that's a cup to a cup and a half. Smoothies are a perfect way to do it. I like the tart cherries with a chocolate, a little chocolate covered cherry vibe. You could make a trail mix though, using the dried tart cherries. That would be a great after run snack or like midday snack. And then I actually hadn't thought of this I'm going to make my overnight oats using tart cherry juice, so I usually put soy milk in, so maybe I'll do a 50-50 blend. I still won't get to that eight ounces that way, so I'd maybe have to have, like the tart cherry juice after I ran, but I think that's a great way to do it.

Speaker 2:

If you love learning nutrition nuggets like this, if you love improving the quality of your life with better nutrition, I would love for you to join my nutrition course. It's called Healthier you. It's a 12-week course designed to help you if you'd like lose weight, boost your energy, boost your control over your nutrition choices. And this episode is airing in April 2024. Jeff Galloway is joining us on April 29th for a special small group chat. So as long as you sign up before April 27th, you'll get to join that. Go to GallowayCoursecom and use the code. Jeff Athletes, listen up it's mail call time.

Speaker 3:

Announcer free present it's mail call time Announcer.

Speaker 1:

Free Present. All right Sarge. Today's question was emailed to us at 321gopodcast at gmailcom, should you wish to ask a question. This is from Lexifer. Nice handle there, lexifer. And she asks could you heavily suggest a bank of porta-potties before the first mile marker? Having to get to the corral so early and stay hydrated makes me really have to. Well, I'll say a pee, and I get that. It's a lot harder for the ladies to. You know, just run off into the woods like the boys.

Speaker 2:

She's saying this, not you. She's still. She is saying that right.

Speaker 1:

Super ridiculous, I know, but it is a big concern and I think it's a legit concern as well. Maybe have some suggestions on how to stay hydrated enough, but not so much that you have to go in the middle of your corral. Well, I'll say this like for I will actually. I just got a text from our run Disney entertainment director, mark Ferreira, and I will actually, in my return text, let him know that people are asking for porta potties prior to the one-mile mark and, frankly, carissa kind of laughing about it because it is sort of funny, but it really does make sense.

Speaker 2:

Well, and it's hard because I need you to be hydrated, especially. You're leaving the hotel You're probably, maybe you're having your coffee. You're getting to the family reunion lot I hope you're going there and then you are waiting in line for about an hour. Now, I could be totally wrong at this. When you start there's, you run past the finish line and you run past. On the right side is the parking lot. This is before you've even made that left-hand turn to go out to Epcot. There is a line of porta potties back there. I don't know if athletes can get to them, but there's literally like 15 porta potties. If you go straight and turn left behind our trailers, 15 porta-potties. If you go straight and turn left behind our trailers, john, you know where we park? Yeah, behind there are porta-potties, and I know this and I'm going to say this in the podcast because in the mornings I know my rules If I have to use the restroom in a way that shouldn't be used in a trailer full of 10 to 15 people.

Speaker 2:

I walk my happy little butt over there, right? Some people choose not to take that walk.

Speaker 3:

Not John. It's not John To shun to push away.

Speaker 2:

But so I know there is a bank of portafies there. I don't know if you can get to it. Other option there are things called. It's like a shiwi, it's a piece of paper, it's a cone. I took them to Africa if you need to stand and do it. But that is a great suggestion. I know it will be passed on, but I would say that the hydration is super, super important. So maybe also driving the course, when you get to Disney, you'll see the signs in the road that will say where the porta potties are. You can kind of plan for that. I know a lot of major marathons have porta potties closer to each specific corral. So those are good suggestions to pass on. To run Disney, because I want you to be hydrated so it doesn't impact your performance. But I've had two kids, I'm a mom and sometimes I leave John on stage to go to the bathroom. Not really actually usually I leave you on stage because I get hungry.

Speaker 1:

That's true that more often than not, I think. I think we both left for a restroom break, but but you have left more frequently, uh, to to fuel up because I start to get like dizzy in the morning sometimes from you know.

Speaker 2:

Anyway, that's not the point of the story, but the point is, lexifer, we hear you. We will try our best because restrooming is important. So thank you for the question. If you guys have more of them Instagram, 321gopodcasts at gmailcom or your stories, we love all of that. That was it, john. That was your cue to wrap.

Speaker 1:

I paused oh was it?

Speaker 2:

And I said yes, and I paused, and then you go, and then you say goodbye. Thanks for listening.

Speaker 1:

All right. Well then, let me do that. Goodbye. Thanks for listening. I just watched the Steve Martin documentary, so I'm in that sort of cynical 70s Steve Martin sort of mood to do things. We want to thank everybody for listening. Please, please, please. If you are a listener, rate the podcast, give us five stars, make a comment we love the comments and again, if anybody wants to reach out to us to ask us a question, we'd love it. That's 321gopodcast at gmailcom.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening and Bye, mom. Three, two, one go.

Running Journey and Air Fryer Recipe
Long Run Safety and Marathon Memories
Elite Runner Meb Keflezighi Reflects
26 Marathons and Charity Fundraising
Meb Keflezighi's Boston Marathon Victory
Reflecting on Historic Boston Marathon Win
Visualization and Perseverance in Running
Inspiration and Advice in Running
Benefits of Tart Cherries for Runners